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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Reading this forum has inspired me to try my hand at raising a few meat rabbits. Started with two practice bunnies ( give away pet rabbits), so far they have been doing great. Last Thursday picked up a lovely Am-chin doe, she had been bred on the 4th of this month. She will just not touch the pellets. These are the same pellets she had been eating, (breeder supplied some). She was on a pellet only diet at the breeders. I put in a tiny amount of hay Friday because I was worried because it did'nt appear as if she had eaten any of the pellets. Well, she just about inhaled that hay. It is now Monday, she still will not touch the pellets. I've tried giving her a different brand of pellets, still no go. She drinks, will eat hay, hops around and appears to be quite healthy. I am baffled, any advice would be very welcome.
 

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OlivYew Farm
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You can add some dry oatmeal to her pellets to encourage her to eat. If nothing else, supply her with as much hay as she will consume. If she won't eat enough to sustain herself you should send her back to her breeder or cull her. You don't want rabbits who will go off feed for every little thing.
 

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Very odd. She may be still upset from the move. Is it possible that she is eating a few pellets and you just can't notice the level going down? Is she pooping normally?

I think at this point you would be wise to make hay available to her, just to get something inside her. You may be creating a monster, though, if you are planning to feed "pellets only" in future. I've never yet had a rabbit that preferred pellets to other foods.
 

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I was going to ask about this and am glad the thread came up. It seems that by feeding extras to the rabbits they will turn their noses at the pellets. Mine still eat some pellets but the young ones prefer hay, my young buck Diego prefers "treats." I'm concerned he may be a tad big for his age. But does appear very healthy and eating.
 

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I think these rabbits are smarter than you think. I'd give her the hay and if you have it some grain with no mollasses.
If she doesn't clean up the pellets you have given her in 6 or 7 days, remove them and give her fresh ones. Keep up the hay and plenty of fresh water. supply a salt block.
Don't breed her till she starts nibbling her pellets.
I asume you have her in isolation away from your other rabbits , right?
 

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aka avdpas77
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It is very strange that a rabbit will no eat the pellets she is used to. I would have thought that maybe the got spoiled or contaminated some way...but if so, she should have eaten the other pellets. Were the other pellets fresh? I would give her all the hay she would eat. If it is cold there, make sure she has constant fresh unfrozen water.

My first thought is that she may have some aversion to the feeder you are feeding her from. You might try giving her some pellets in something total unrelated to your rabbitry, an old dish from your kitchen, for instance. She will probaly turn it over before long, but at least you would know if she found some offense with the feeder. I had one breed of rabbits that would absolutely refuse to eat feed out of a metal "self feeder"
 

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It is very strange that a rabbit will no eat the pellets she is used to. I would have thought that maybe the got spoiled or contaminated some way...but if so, she should have eaten the other pellets. Were the other pellets fresh? I would give her all the hay she would eat. If it is cold there, make sure she has constant fresh unfrozen water.

My first thought is that she may have some aversion to the feeder you are feeding her from. You might try giving her some pellets in something total unrelated to your rabbitry, an old dish from your kitchen, for instance. She will probaly turn it over before long, but at least you would know if she found some offense with the feeder. I had one breed of rabbits that would absolutely refuse to eat feed out of a metal "self feeder"
Good point! Rabbits are soooo stubborn. A small casserole dish or crock with straight sides will be harder for her to turn over, especially if it does not have a lip for her to hook her teeth on.
 

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I was going to ask about this and am glad the thread came up. It seems that by feeding extras to the rabbits they will turn their noses at the pellets. Mine still eat some pellets but the young ones prefer hay, my young buck Diego prefers "treats." I'm concerned he may be a tad big for his age. But does appear very healthy and eating.
Skip, I fed a "hybrid" diet of pellets and greens for a long time before taking the plunge and going pellet-free. What I found was that they would eat the greens first, always, but then fill up on the pellets afterwards.

I did have one pregnant doe go on a hunger strike and refuse pellets for several days - angrily scrabbling them out of the feeder and dumping the dish I gave her. That episode gave me grey hair worrying about her, but it did neither her nor her kits any harm. Pat Lamar advised me to cut off everything except pellets until she smartened up and I followed this advice. After a few days she began eating pellets again and shortly after that I began adding small amount of greens to her diet as before.

One way to combat this is to feed the greens/treats in the morning and the pellets at night. The rabbits get used to the routine if you stick to it and know what to expect. You get fewer bunny snits that way! :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks to all for your replies!! To clarify a bit, she is a bred doe 7 - 8 months old. The pellets are fresh, some of what I have offered her are from the same feed bag that her breeder was using. I did try to feed her out of a different type of feeder, she promptly dumped it. I'm using a standard j type feeder, the same as she ate out of all her life. She is well away from the other rabbits, and really seems to be a very calm and curious doe. From the pile of bunnie berries under her hutch, it appears as if all is well digestively, (is that a word?) I have put a small amount of oatmeal on top of the pellets, she appears to have eaten all of it, maybe a few pellets too. It is good to know, MaggieJ that you have dealt with this, and had a good outcome. Squashnut, what sort of salt block should I look for?
 

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How far along is she?
I use the dark pink pnes from the feed store.
 
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