Doe acting strange, poor vision

Discussion in 'Goats' started by StockDogLovr, Nov 20, 2017.

  1. StockDogLovr

    StockDogLovr Well-Known Member

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    I have a Boar doe, older, not sure how many years old but 3 or more. I have one other doe, and many sheep, all of which live out in dry pasture which currently has little nutritional value. I bring the herd in each night with supplemental alfalfa and sudan hay (which was baled just a month ago from an irrigated pasture). Everyone is fat though I don't feed a lot of hay. They also have a protein tub. I know I have a copper insufficiency here due to high molybdenum, so they get a cattle tub that does contain copper. They don't get grain. Yes, I know about sheep and copper.

    Tonight, when the flock came into their pen for hay (which they usually all dive into), Sally laid down and stayed down while everyone else ate. NOT her usual self! I went into to check her over, and she acted a little disoriented. I went and got a little grain to see if she was interested in food at all. She didn't dive into the bucket like the other doe, acted like she couldn't see it, but when I got her face into it, she ate. When I pulled the bucket away, she did not orient to it to keep feeding; I had to hold it to her.

    I am freaking out because I am supposed to be flying out of state for Thanksgiving on Wednesday. I researched and came up with listeria and polio. I don't know that my ranch sitter would have the skill to inject her by herself, let alone every 6 hours as I read on one site for listeria, with pen g. I have dex but it would have to be dosed reliably every day while I am gone.

    On top of that, I found that my bottle of fortified B complex seems to have gone bad. When I pulled a dose it looked almost black in the syringe. It has preservatives in it, so is it bad?

    Tonight I gave her the pen G. I was able to sneak up on her and grab her collar. I do think her vision is compromised.

    Help!
     
  2. mzgarden

    mzgarden Well-Known Member

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  3. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    Blind usually means polio. Have a vet out and get fresh rx thiamine. Train farm help in giving injections. They're very easy. If she's skittish, confine her so she is easy to medicate for the full duration of treatment.
     
  4. sammyd

    sammyd Well-Known Member

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    perhaps pink eye...
     
  5. Jcran

    Jcran Well-Known Member

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    How'd that doe do?
     
  6. StockDogLovr

    StockDogLovr Well-Known Member

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    I'm sorry to not get back sooner. Her symptoms progressed rapidly despite the B-complex and antibiotics, and since she was seizing I had my neighbor put her down. I had her necropsied and the finding was polio, but the vet said I'd have had to give her the B Complex IV in order to make any difference at the point (something I have never done) and that even if saved they are often mentally affected, "stupid" if you will.

    I just didn't have time to figure it all out and the symptoms came on so rapidly and progressed so rapidly, I was in a panic. My farm help isn't that competent, unfortunately. I found a new kid to do the ranch sitting now who raises his own sheep and I think would have been better for all of this, but it wasn't to be.

    I don't understand why her rumen went sideways. I wasn't feeding grain. They're on poor dry pasture, low sugar and protein, so I have the 24% cattle tubs and feed supplemental alfalfa and sudan hay. She also showed low selenium, and I have selenium blocks out there but have put out loose selenium salt.

    Our land has high molybdenum which creates an insufficient copper scenario, but her liver copper value was adequate so the supplementation was doing its job in that regard. I don't know how old she was as she was given to me without disclosure of her age.

    I just wanted to share the results so that people can learn from my mistake, not knowing to give the B complex IV. Sad to have lost her.
     
    boerboy and Jcran like this.
  7. mzgarden

    mzgarden Well-Known Member

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    I'm sorry you lost her.