Do you try to seperate your soon to be moms from the herd?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by jwcinpk, Dec 31, 2004.

  1. jwcinpk

    jwcinpk Well-Known Member

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    Just wondered how many of you seperate your soon to be moms from the herd? With 30 head there is virtually no way i can have a seperate pen for the several that are due soon. We have had our buck with them year round and watch them and try to predict when lil ones are coming. Got a surprise yesterday though, 3 new babies all to the same mom, however one was dead. There are about 5 more of my girls ready to pop. I worry about the ones that will be having their first babies. I geuss as long as they can get in the barn they'll be fine though. We have pretty warm weather forecast for the next week, but it is supposed to rain. The older girls don't get out in the weather to have theirs, but i am afraid the young ones will! I geuss I just hope for the best. Any suggestions?
     
  2. GoldenWood Farm

    GoldenWood Farm Legally blonde! Supporter

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    Try any way you can to get a area for your pregnent girls. At the very least put your ones that are ready to kid the soonest together in a pen so that way there are less goats than in the herd. I if I was you would try to fix up something for a doe who is about to kid.

    MotherClucker
     

  3. Unregmpillow

    Unregmpillow Guest

    I do seperate at about 2 weeks before due date, but I only have 5 does. We put stalls in the barn for each "family" and my herd queen gets really nasty when pregers so she gets her own barn. After the kids are sold and/or weaned stall doors are removed. I dont usually milk the herd queen and her babies can be left free loose with her without any other doe bothering them because they'd have HECK to pay from momma. But I'm afraid she would hurt others' kids....

    You might cut your barn in half and try to at least give the soon 2b mom's a little quieter area. We also use stalls in the woodshed because by April a couple bays are always empty.
     
  4. farmmaid

    farmmaid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yes, @ 4 weeks before kidding when they get their CD/T and BO-Se shots so I can monitor their feed better and so they will not get "butted" as they get bigger...Joan
     
  5. Mrs. Ed

    Mrs. Ed Active Member

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    We, like you, leave our buck in year 'round so we have to watch closely to tell who's pregnant. We DO try to move them ahead of time, if possible to another area we have that is fenced with a little barn on it so they can come in & out of the barn as they please, graze & have shelter. We call it the "nursery".

    If we separate them, then we don't have to comb the acreage looking for the babies. We have learned that our mommas will hide the babies so they can go eat. We have spent a lot of time hunting babies, so we try to move them to a somewhat confined area where we can keep a check on them. Plus, we worry about rough treatment from Big Billy and Samson (our still pretty young Great Pyr).

    It may be easier on yourself, not to mention your mamas-to-be if you can separate them somehow at least for the first week or so.
     
  6. Al. Countryboy

    Al. Countryboy Well-Known Member

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    I could see where with thirty pregnant does this might be hard to do. I do feel that if I had left one of my first time moms in with an older doe that she would have helped. This was my first year with goats and when I went home to call my wife to tell her that we were having babies and got back the doe kid had been delivered and still in the placenta (dead). I think my older doe would have cleaned it up.
    I know my due dates on my does and since they have plenty of room under my have barn will probably leave my four does together. I am more concerned about leaving them all together after kidding than before. Got one mom that could be mean and hurt others kids.
    Like Mrs. Ed said, I had a terrible time last year with my does hidding their kids when I let them out in the mornings. I don't know if they were hiding them or they just would lay down and take a nap. Those little buggers are sometimes hard to find all curled up. After about two weeks they seemed to keep up ok, but that first few days was a real pain. Mamas bauling over lost babies and babies bauling over lost mamas. :( :( We live on a fairly steep mountain and helping moms look for kids right at dark is no fun. :no: :no: :no:
     
  7. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    When I had boers I used a maternity pen, really just another barn in about an acre, but it was mostly grass, so the does wouldn't hide their kids out in the underbrush. This way the doelings could also be disbudded, wormed and the bucklings sold before they where breeding their sisters. Once weaned, the adult does went back out with the main herd and the buck, and the doelings stayed trapped in the area until old enough to be bred. This also kept the entire herd who didn't need it from eating grain that was then left for very bred does and their later nursing kids.

    Now with the Nubians it's nice to have a clean bright maternity pen for the use in emergencies, anything from a true stuck kid that I need good light to help, or a young doe who is being harrassed by and older doe. But 99% of my does kid in the main barn. Vicki
     
  8. Sondra Peterson

    Sondra Peterson Well-Known Member

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    yes I separate my very preggers until the kids are abt 2 wks old or 3.
     
  9. Ark

    Ark Well-Known Member

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    What would you do if you had 10 acres, and no individual pens? (Besides the dog's pen.) :confused:

    Our goats are SO TAME it's unbelievable. LOL
    We don't have a barn.
    They sleep under the carport at night - they have their own area in between the 2 trucks.
    They have 2 (with more in progress) "goat huts" under there as well to give them a warmer place to snuggle when it gets REALLY cold. These goat huts are made on a pallet, and are 3 sided. I've seen 4 huge Nubians squeeze into one when it is REALLY cold.
    The ones who dont sleep in a hut, sleep on a bed of hay.

    Do you think that TAME goats will go off and kid in the woods?

    We do have a "cage" that goes on our flat bed trailer. It is 5'X10', made of cattle panel. We put it on the trailer whenever we need to haul goats. I COULD put a tarp over it and use it as a private area for a sick goat, or a goat due to kid. But, I'd rather not since they dont like to be penned up alone.

    SO, what do yall think I should do?
    Thanks,
    Rachel
     
  10. Ark

    Ark Well-Known Member

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    :no: ooops!
    Sorry jwcinpk, I just realized I hijacked your thread with a question of my own instead of answering yours!
    :worship:

    Sorry I dont have an answer for you - o was kinda in the same boat....

    Rachel
     
  11. Tracy in Idaho

    Tracy in Idaho Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I had just about every one kid in the main pen last year, but I did have a maternity pen set up as well. I may use it more this year (unless I have 3 kidding at once again!) because I really got tired of the other does trying to "help" me!!! My old girl I had to fight off the other doe's afterbirths! Not exactly a bio-secure type of deal <G> But, we'll see what happens when the time comes.

    Tracy
     
  12. Baaa

    Baaa Active Member

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    Our Boer buck runs with the 12 Boer does, I let my 2 milkers LaMancha and nubie doe run with the herd also, but this is after the does are bred to dairy bucks. I know when my milkers are bred but I have to watch for dirty tails on the boers and then estimate the due date time. At about the due date time I udder watch those Boer does and bring them up so I can watch and wait for them to kid. Last year I saw and was there for every birth except 1. I have 3 pens and 2 stalls with runs to put the mamas with kids. They stay there with mom doe until about 3 months old ,kids have been gentled up,got their shots ,been wormed and wethered if a buck .. after that I turn they loose with the others. We get rid of all mean goats or we band those horns if we want to keep the doe as my milkers are hornless. Most of the time except for the 4 months that my milkers are bred they stay up close so I can feed and milk them. They have 2 houses so they can be with their own kids and not butt each other.

    We keep a small herd so we can keep control of things and caregiving.
     
  13. MARY OKREY

    MARY OKREY Member

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    We seperate our mommas when they are close. We watch for their bags to fill and discharge from their rear. Our first year we let our mommas give birth in the same barn area with all the others and several of our babies appeared to get squashed. Go to www.fiascofarms.com, they have tons of info. that has really helped us in the past.
     
  14. Erica Calkins

    Erica Calkins Member

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    Last year, 04, we had 29 does and 1 buck. There was no way we could seperate all the bred does into their own pen! Just not enough room here.

    We had learned by riasing goats that when you pull them away from the herd you end up having more problems. So don't pull your does away. Just let them have the kid in the mix of everyone else. (Of course you want to check in on them quit a bit! While in labor just in case there is trouble.)

    Once the goat has the kid then you might want to pull them away from the herd for a time. This way Mom and Babys can get to know one another and you know Mom is taking care of them.

    We used to have a box stall ready for new mom's and baby's. At times there were 5 does and up to 9 kids in the same pen. They all did great and mom's knew who was there baby. (Of course there was this one mom who didn't care who ate from her so she fed everyone's kids! OH BROTHER !! :~} She was a great mom to everyone, but did become really skinny! So we had to feed her more.)

    ONce does and babys are around good then you can put them back wiht the herd. At least that is what we did. I sure hope this helps Erica, Mich
     
  15. Erica Calkins

    Erica Calkins Member

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    boy I feel like an odd duck. I just was able to read all the post's, after replying. It seems like most people pull their mom's away! We used to but found that it slowed the labor down because they were so nervice over being away from the herd. That is why we stopped pulling does away. You end up having more problem's with the pulling away from herd deal then when you leave them alone. (At least that is what we found.) We do also raise Boer's. (our numbers are down now, 5 does. We used to have 30 goats.) And to be honest if you don't have the room to pull every thing then why even try. It just stresses the animal any way's and that isn't good. Goats are herd animals and like other goats around!!! Erica Mich.
     
  16. Tracy in Idaho

    Tracy in Idaho Well-Known Member Supporter

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    For what it's worth, mine aren't the least bit nervous, because the maternity pen is right next to the main pen :) It just lets you deal with them without "helpers" that are glopping around in the fluids.

    I snatch kids at birth, so we don't have the concern over them bonding....I don't even want them to see each other. Babies are handed off to a helper as soon as they come out and are breathing, and mom gets to clean my hands off and fixate on me for awhile.

    A gal I know down the road with boers simply kids them all out in a barn, along with the buck in the midst. I think she has lost a few kids, but overall it seems to work okay for her.

    And that's what's important ....finding whatever works for your own herd! :)

    Tracy
     
  17. trickham

    trickham Well-Known Member

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    Erica,

    Don't feel like too much of an odd duck. I don't separate my does either, but they have plenty of room to move off and have their kids at a fair distance from everybody else. They are still close enough for me to keep an eye on though. After a two or three days they will re-join the herd on their own, with bouncing kids in tow.
     
  18. GoatTalkr9

    GoatTalkr9 Well-Known Member

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    Well,it's always up to the owner. I seperate mine,for safety's sake. I didn't lose a single kid last year. A neighbor,on the other hand,leaves hers to kidd in the midst of the herd,and lost 4 out of 6. All herd related. If they had been seperated,she wouldn't have lost a single one. Pneumonia set into one,another froze to death,yet another had its neck broken by the buck... I seperate mine when I see discharge or the doe is seperating herself from the group. Each doe has her own kidding time/stall,and can kidd,clean up baby,rest,without worries of anyone else bothering her. I kept the moms/babies penned up together for the first week,allowing moms to go out into the lot to excercise/chill away from babies at least once a day...then I slowly reintroduce everyone back together. I didn't have any problems because everyone was interested in their own kids. We would disbud/wether while everyone was penned up in the barn lot too.
     
  19. moosemaniac

    moosemaniac Well-Known Member

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    I just got involved with goats last Spring. I have 3 does, 1 buck and a wether. I left the buck with the does all summer and fall, so I have no idea when kidding will take place. I'm kind of going on who is the largest should go first, but I'm probably wrong, since I do have a first freshener in the group. We will be separating the buck and wether from the girls this spring. Meanwhile, they are housed separately at night. The girls have one shed and the boys another. I have a gated area in the girls' shed where I've been putting one of the does at night for the last 7 weeks because I've been convinced EVERY night she was going into labor. I'm getting very tired :rolleyes: . I'm happy to see that someone else's queen is cranky when pregnant. My Mermaid is just nasty! Particularly to the wether. They run in the same pasture during the day for now.

    Not meaning to hijack this thread...can anyone give me any idea when I should be concerned about impending labor? I work during the day, but my bosses are pretty sympathetic about my needing to be here when labor starts.

    Next year I will DEFINATELY control breeding dates!

    Ruth
     
  20. GoatTalkr9

    GoatTalkr9 Well-Known Member

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    Has anyone told you or shown you how to check the ligaments by the tail? That was a HUGE help to me! I was able to tell when the does were close to kidding time..I was only wrong on one doe. Her ligaments were still hard in the morning,and be late afternoon she had kidded. Darn goat,lol!