Do you think these vegetables would be good to sell?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by moonwolf, Mar 20, 2005.

  1. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    What do you think about these vegetables to sell at a Farmer's Market?
    Would most customers know what they are?
    What price would you charge?:

    Rhubarb
    Kohl Rabi
    Shallots
    Salsify
    Borage
    Summer Savory
    Rose Hips
    Snow Peas
    Celeriac
    Beet Greens
    Garden Huckleberries

    Feel free to Add any other odd vegetable sale ideas to offer customers at farm gate or the farmer's market?
     
  2. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    If you want to be successful, you really need to study your market. If it were me, I'd ask other sellers what goes best. Here in my area the only things on your list that would likely sell out here are shallots, beet greens, Snow peas and the hucks.

    I'm not a regular at our market unless I happen to have a ton of extra stuff and a free Saturday morning. But things I have always had success with is salad in a bag (mixed greens along with whatever else is in season, Snow peas, carrots, whatever), Garlic is always a big seller, small beets and new red potatoes for some reason. Corn is always popular.

    I'm constantly amazed what folks will pay for real fresh salad in a bag! I just take a box of zip-lock bags and a salad spinner to the garden with me, pick, rinse, spin, rip and tear and toss it in bags. I don't really weigh anything and tell folks that ask it's sold by volume, not weight. There's probably 3 or 4 pounds of stuff in 'em and I charge five to six dollars, depending on how many I have to sell. Never have brought one home again.

    When the garlic is ready, I take a bunch to the market with me and braid it to order if I can get one of the kids to do the rest of the work. Folks love to watch you work and will pay a surprising amount for a braid over loose garlic.
     

  3. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    beans, yellow and green string beans ,broad beans,corn,new potatoes ,dill, small gerkins,TOMATOES. lots of things are area spacific in an itailian area itailan vegys sell well .we have numerous nationalitys within driving distance so we aim to a ready market for most vegys.pricing is tricky if you aim 10-15%above the local store you are usually ok . depends on the year too if you have good tomatoes and the ones in the store are scabby then 25% is not out of line .there was a web site will have to check on for vegy pricing at market, not sure if it is fmo or the veg market. if something is not selling well you may have to make up a dish that you are eating to show the prep and aroma(can't give out samples). other vendors can mess up pricing by setting there price lower for inferior product. just one of the variables
     
  4. bethlaf

    bethlaf Homegrown Family

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    salsify may or may not sell, it depends if they know what it is , depending where you ar,e rhubarb may or may not sell, tomatoes sell like crazy as do melons and berries , beet greens... are you down south ?
    are you making hand out recipe cards for some ofyour more unusual veggies? are you making cute little signs telling about your novelties? all these things can help sell what otherwise wouldnt,
    samples, if allowed are great , describing your farming philosohpy if youre organic or all heirlooms helps a TON!!
    a lot of farmers market isnt veggies , its MARKETING
    sounds silly butl ots of folks dont think about htat
    another thing to remember is if youre going to do farmers market, you must be prepared to be there every week , you will build up a client base, and they will look for you, dont think they wont ,
    and if you miss a week, youve essentially lost youre following , unless theres good reason , like youre pregnant and fit to burst kind of thing . but still attendance is mandatory, even if you only have a few things to sell, you need to be there to sell them

    let see, ruminating here
    dont discount produce towards the end of the sale day, that veggie is just as valuable at noon as it was at 7 am .
    besides if it doesnt sell , your family will eat it
    cut flowers can sell really well too , making a lot more money than you would think
    in fall statice and dry flowers will sell for between 5-7.00 for even small bunches, make sure to plan for that
    Beth
     
  5. birdie_poo

    birdie_poo Well-Known Member

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    My farmers market sells most.

    Rhubarb $3.00 for 5 stalks
    Kohl Rabi Not sold, but I am sure yuppies would pay $1 a pound
    Shallots $3.00 a pound
    Salsify Not sold, and can't even think of a price
    Borage Considered a weed, here, maybe just the flowers fo salads @ herb prices?
    Summer Savory Herbs are normally sold in bunchs for 33 cents to $1.
    Rose Hips Not seen these sold in any form other than vitamins, so I have not clue
    Snow Peas if the pod is edible, I've seen upwards of $2 a pound
    Celeriac Not grown around here, so it would go for a mint, I would think maybe $1-3 a bulb???
    Beet Greens Here, the greens get tossed and scooped up for free by use shoppers with animals.
    Garden Huckleberries IU've seen small baskets gor for $3 or more each.

    Unusual or exotics are big sellers at our market. Of course, organic sells the most. Even have people who sell worm poo.
     
  6. tallpines

    tallpines Well-Known Member

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    Rhubarb and Kolh Rabi sell well at our Produce Auction.
     
  7. bethlaf

    bethlaf Homegrown Family

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    kohlrabi is a northern thing , its them darn norwegians and belgian folks, down here , in ark.. no one even knows what it is :) same with rhubarb , but i see youre in canada, so both of those would go over lots better up there ... snow peas sell for 3.00 lb
    huckleberries, 3.50-4.00 pint
    rose hips, smae herei harvest them for myself and home use, but never sold them , or had enough to consider it
    beet greens will sell here as part of a salad mix (mesclun sells for 4.00 a lb here)
    beets with tops will sell a bunch of 6 for 2.00
    your best bet is to call the local farmers market and see if they have a growers meeting , that will be your best source for what to grow sell , and prices
     
  8. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

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    I would include a pie recipe with the garden huckleberries, as they don't taste good raw.
     
  9. HilltopDaisy

    HilltopDaisy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    This will be my first year at market. I plan on growing the basics, stuff that I would buy if I didn't grow a garden. I've also asked my coworkers "Would you buy this?", as a guideline. I plan on making laminated signs, and writing in (with erasable markers) the price when I'm setting up my table, based on what the experienced venders are charging. Nothing will go to waste, as what doesn't sell will be put up for myself or fed to the critters.
     
  10. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    Boy, are you ever right about that! Raw garden huckleberries look attractive, but horrible tasting. Thanks for the pie recipe suggestion. I think that would be very good.

    On the prices and suggestions above mentioned, thanks all. Those are excellent to consider. The kohl rabi isn't well known here either, but if some samples were tasted, I bet they woudl go over well. Easy to grow here, too.

    The mixed salad ideas are great, because I would never grow just one kind of salad green anyway.