Do you plant from seed...or sprout them indoors first?

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Jodi, Apr 26, 2005.

  1. Jodi

    Jodi Well-Known Member

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    Just a question out of curiosity. I was wondering how many people plant their garden directly from seeds and how many sprout them indoors first before transplanting outside.

    I have tried sprouting them first, but do not have much luck in tempering them before planting them outside. Most of my seedlings wind up dying. So, I'm thinking next year of sowing directly from seed. I live in Northern Indiana. Can you grow a successful garden direct from seeds in the ground?

    Sorry if this is a stupid sounding question! New to gardening here.

    Jodi
     
  2. hollym

    hollym Well-Known Member

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    There are no stupid questions, is my theory, just requests for information that you don't possess!

    Hoo, I plant with both, actually. Sometimes I have fine luck with seeds and sometimes I don't! Things like squash and beans usually come up well. This year all of my corn is mysteriously missing, lol, and I think the birds had a party and forgot to invite OR inform me! SO I'm starting that again inside. I have had good luck planting it under burlap before, though, and it will poke up through it.

    This year I'm trying to learn how to seed start in the house. I thought it would be a good thing to know, plants are pricey and they don't always have the kinds that I want.

    You could try some of each? You could plant warm weather stuff inside for now, but from my experience, avoid the Jiffy Peat pellets, and things like beans don't like to transplant, so put them in a peat POT with starting mix, or a newspaper pot or something that you can put the whole thing in the ground.

    Sure, and you'll get lots more good advice from other gardeners, so best of luck, and mostly HAVE FUN!! The first garden is just so great, and will be such a good memory, and source of laughter, lol.

    hollym
     

  3. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    I do both. Seeds and started plants. Tomatoes seem to always prefer to be transplanted. I've done squash both ways the same season and couldn't tell any difference so won't transplant it or melons anymore. Beans and corn I soak in warm water before planting and cover with a good layer of straw to keep the birds out. Lettuce I've sown and transplanted. Sowing it in the fall works best for me. Then it is up way early in the spring and handles the frost better. Same with dill and spinach and some flowers like sunflowers. I'm going to try some others this fall like carrots and see how they do. Peppers transplant well and can be dug up in the fall before frost and overwintered one winter then replanted in the spring for two years of harvest. Tomatoes can be overwintered from cuttings. Take more cuttings in the spring and root them. Then plant for a real fast start.
     
  4. Jodi

    Jodi Well-Known Member

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    Thanks so much for the advice! I am determined to have a good garden one of these seasons! I planted some of my bean seeds direct into the soil today and I already have some container cucumbers coming up in my planter.


    Jodi
     
  5. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

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    Beans, carrots, beets, corn and turnips go straight in the ground. Everything else I start indoors..... prevents thinning :D
     
  6. A.T. Hagan

    A.T. Hagan Guest

    Most anything with large seeds I direct plant into the garden. Small seeded stuff I typically transplant except for the sort of things that I mass seed like greens.

    You can transplant just about anything if you're careful and don't let the plants get more than about two true leaves before you put them in the ground. It's a lot of extra work and bother though so direct seeding is better for those things that are easily sown that way.

    .....Alan.
     
  7. Kazahleenah

    Kazahleenah Disgruntled citizen

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    I start most of my seeds indoors mostly because the growing season here is a tad on the short side. As far as tempering them.... start on days when the conditions are near perfect.... leaving them out gradually a lil longer and longer... (cloudy days are the days I start setting them outside). after a week or two (depending on weather) they sit outside still in their lil pots 24/7 then into the garden they go. :) Make sure when it's full sun that you water them WELL before placing them outside... the heat will dry out those small pots so fast!
    Best of luck!!
    Kaza
     
  8. sullen

    sullen Question Answerer

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    I planted my carrots outside last year and they did fine! I was just reading that carrots do well with with radishes and onions...the radishes come out first, leaving room for the interplanted onions and carrots. I'm trying that one this year.
     
  9. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

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    We do both; if they say not to transplant, try anyway. We have had good luck with everything. Because we now have a greenhouse, we start indoors when the wind is blowing or it is too cold to direct seed.