do you pasteurise your milk?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Caren, Sep 2, 2005.

  1. Caren

    Caren Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,010
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2005
    Location:
    Alma MI
    Do you do this for human consumption? If not what if the doe sticks her foot in the bucket or kicks hay chaff in it? I wash with an antibacterial baby wipe before I milk but I am nevous to give the milk to my human kids with out pastuerising it first. I would also like to make cheese and butter. If I pasteurise the milk does that make it unacceptable to make cheese and butter?

    I am really stuggling with this choice.

    Caren
     
  2. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,817
    Joined:
    May 6, 2002
    Location:
    North of Houston TX
    Yes you do this for human consumption but also for raising their own babies, to stop the disease process. It's alot more than being negative for CAE the reason you keep on pasturising to feed you babies.

    But your right to be concerned. You can aliveate your concerns by knowing the health and history of your goats. I would not buy goats from auction, take them home and milk them, and feed the milk raw to my grand children. Most of the answers you get are from folks who are milking goats for several years. Most folks who answer the question with "of course you should drink the milk raw, and not pasturise" are also not the ones answering the hundreds of health questions on this and other forums, and alot of the health problems also affect the milk.

    But if you purchased your stock from a reputable person who does test their goats, or perhaps you yourself have had goats awhile, than yes drink the milk raw. But if there is no health history behind your goats and you are new, I think all children until they are at least a year old should drink the milk pasturized, I also think the elderly should also. Something simple that our healthy bodies can slough off, can be detrimental to a young child or an older person with a weakend immune system.

    I always answer the question with what I do. I have a 7 week old grandson, and will use goat milk to feed him with my daughters pumped milk (she goes back to work next week and I do not like my grandbabies this young in daycare), it will be pasturised until he is drinking from a cup.

    This isn't the answer this forum wants to read, but it is my honest opinion.

    You can't make butter if you pasturize the milk first. And goat butter is a lesson in patience which I don't have :) But yes you can make cheese with pasturized milk, also soap and lotion. In fact for my hard cheese, I get a much more consistant batch time after time with the milk pasturized.

    But milk is no longer fit for human consumption once a doe puts her foot in it. Manure is the number one cause of most disease in milk. If you do a search we just last month talked this issue to death and I listed a small list of milk borne disease, and also manure to milk borne disease.

    It isn't meant to frighten anyone, I think with knowledge comes power. When you make informed choices with all the answers, not just the bubbles and light ones, you make better choices. Vicki
     

  3. sheep tamer

    sheep tamer former HT member

    Messages:
    276
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2005
    If anyone, your opinion is highly esteemed here!
    Good for you for keeping that grandbaby from
    daycare at such an early age. Didn't know you
    were *grandma* age yet, Vicki! ;)
     
  4. Caren

    Caren Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,010
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2005
    Location:
    Alma MI
    Thanks Vicki.

    The stepped in milk I have been putting in the freezer marked for not drinking to use for soaps and maybe even lotions if I ever get the time to make them up ;) .

    I just got my goat 2 weeks ago and she was in the most unsanitary conditions.

    I can live with out the goat butter but the cheese was a major issue!

    I ran a search on this site and the web in general and didn't find what I was looking for but it was in my Storeys Guide to Dairy Goats.

    My people kids are 6,7,8 and 10 but I still hesitate to feed them non-pasturised milk.

    Caren
     
  5. Julia

    Julia Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    391
    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2003
    Caren, throw the milk that has been stepped in out---it's got fecal matter in it and any number of pathogenic bacteria. Why would you want to smear that on your face as a lotion?

    And as far as cheese goes, pasteurizing at regular temperatures will mess up your curd formation to the point that it will cause the cheese to fail, so take the time to pasteurize at the lower temp of 145 degrees F. for 30 minutes. That's what commercial cheesemakers do. Or use raw milk, and age the cheese for 60 days at 50 degrees F.

    And throw out any milk that has manure (or a foot) in it, OK?
     
  6. Caren

    Caren Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,010
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2005
    Location:
    Alma MI
    Your right about not using the stepped in milk for lotion but when you mix it with lye for soap the lye will kill any of the bad stuff in it.

    Is it normal for a doe to resist milking? I tie her leggs now so she can't kick the bucket and when she realises she can't do that she tries to hunker down to make it more difficult to milk her. Yesterday I got mad and pulled the hair by her tail. She stood up real fast :p .

    Caren
     
  7. Julia

    Julia Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    391
    Joined:
    Jan 29, 2003
    Yeah, especially in first fresheners or does who have never been milked before. I would spend 2 to 3 months breaking yearlings into the milking string, and it would about kill me. After a while, I learned to limit the number of first fresheners to just a few (even if I had a new buck who I wanted to prove) because too many makes milking hell.

    The second freshening was always much easier. By then, they knew what they had to do.
     
  8. dscott7972

    dscott7972 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    158
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2004
    Location:
    Southern Indiana
    My first goats (Nubians) where bottled fed and milked a few years before I got them and they where great to start with. I later got a Tog and a Mutt goat that had never been milked and boy it took a long time to train them (three mos?) but they are grat now.
    We do not pasturize. We did for the first two years but I hate the idea of destroying the good bacteria.
     
  9. Caren

    Caren Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,010
    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2005
    Location:
    Alma MI
    I think if the doe was born and raised on my farm so I knew everything about her I probably wouldn't pasteurize the milk but I rescued this doe from an absolutely disgusting situation where she was exposed to God know what. So for now I will pastuerize the milk (and maybe even learn to spell it.) :)
     
  10. okgoatgal2

    okgoatgal2 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,801
    Joined:
    May 28, 2002
    Location:
    oklahoma
    in the situation you describe, pasturize. now, the stepped in milk, i always feed to dogs, hogs, chickens, something gets use of it. i did used to pasturize it and can it for feeding babies the next spring. i figured anything not killed by pasturizing was killed by canning, and i never had any problems doing that. i did feed my kids raw milk, the youngest from the age of 2 months or so, but it was from my goats or mom's goats, both very healthy herds, with no disease issues. would i feed a baby raw milk from goats i didn't own, NO. would i feed a child or drink myself raw milk from a goat in the situation you describe? not for a year or so to make sure the goat was healthy. i do let my does nurse babies. i milk once a day until babies are weaned (around the time school gets out) and then twice a day. i take the babies away in the am, and i do bottle feed them before i turn them back to mama after i milk in the pm. babies are allowed to nurse all nite. they grow quite well on this schedule, even though it doesn't follow the CAE prevention rules. i don't have CAE in my herd, although the tests aren't accurate anyway.