Do you give tresspassers permission when they ask?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by r.h. in okla., Sep 20, 2004.

  1. Would just like to know what everybody thinks when you have posted or not posted land and someone is kind enough to ask permission to hunt. The Oklahoma wildlife department has stated that many times the land owner just wants to know who is on their land and would possibly be glad to give permission if only the people would ask. So far I'm batting 1000 on being turned down when asking for permission to bowhunt. I even explain to them that I use a homemade stick bow only and the deer have to be within 15 yards before I even attempt to shoot at it. Therefore there is no way I could mistaken a cow or horse for a deer. Sometimes seems like honesty gets you no where!
     
  2. Gayle in KY

    Gayle in KY Gadabout

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    I used to give anyone who asked permission to hunt here, but no more. Someone shot my Jersey cow a couple of years ago. I only let one neighbor hunt here, now.
     

  3. OUVickie

    OUVickie Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think too many people have been burned by the "I'm a friend of so and so and he said the owner doesn't mind".
    We had a couple of guys tell us the previous owner had given them permission, but my husband only allows two friends to hunt on our place, that way the wildlife doesn't get overhunted and we know they won't harm our animals.

    What you might do is offer to lease. If they know your willing to pay, they might realize you're a responsible hunter. Our friends trade us meat for hunting rights and we've agreed to restrict it to just the two of them. Our neighbor does the same thing and it keeps this area from being overrun by poachers and such.
     
  4. Siryet

    Siryet In Remembrance

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    Sorry to hear about being turned down so much.

    I will not let anyone hunt on my property because of the liability.

    So don't blame me, and the next time someone you know gets a big "out of court settlement" remember that they (Money :worship: grabbin Lawyers :mad: ) are the reason you are being turned down, not the land owner.
     
  5. Lt. Wombat

    Lt. Wombat Well-Known Member

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    We're with Siryet on this one. But, aside from the liability issue, we have had our fences cut and our stock let out, deer taken and the gut piles left behind, no tresspass signs blown apart with guns, and a few camps discovered with fires not put out.

    Now anyone who comes to the door is curtly told to leave after their license plate is recorded. I just refuse to be a victim on my own property!
     
  6. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I used to, but the liability is too big. Hurt yourself in any way, and you will own my property. Some lawyer will find a way to blame me for your stupidity. And somewhere there is a judge & jury that would go along with it.

    There is no other option but to say 'no' until the liability laws change in this country. Anyone who would let you hunt these days is a fool. Sorry to say.

    --->Paul
     
  7. TexCountryWoman

    TexCountryWoman Gig'em

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    We used to let the occasional friend hunt. But suddenly we had more and more "occasional" friends around deer season. Well, family comes first and we had deer hunters in the family. It got to be where people we would never hear from would suddenly call from out of the blue, like our new best friends, and want to hunt. It really got to be a problem, We finally had to say no. It was hard to do because it was not that we wished to be unkind. The ranch is now only for family members who don't even hunt every year, but that is fine. One poor woman on a neighboring ranch spray painted COW in flourescent paint on the sides of all the cattle just prior to deer season because she was tired of people shooting them! There are very responsible hunters out there, and hats off to bow-hunters, real hunters in my book, but just a few bad apples can and do spoil it for so many responsible people.
     
  8. SteveD(TX)

    SteveD(TX) Well-Known Member

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    We have almost 100% woods, and lots of deer and game. But...the only person who has ever asked was my stepson. We told him no. My wife loves the deer, and so far they aren't a nuisance to us. But a few weeks ago, I talked to my neighbor, who has an 1800 acre ranch across the road from me. He said the deer are stressed, he might for the first time in 15 years let some people bow hunt.
     
  9. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Sounds to me like honesty is getting you an honest answer! My No Hunting/No Trespassing signs mean just what they say and we don't make exceptions. My BILs all know this too.

    At least being honest saves you from paying a fine, going to jail, getting shot or all of the above!
     
  10. JulieNC

    JulieNC Well-Known Member

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    We live in a rural subdivision where everyone has 10 acres. We have posted no tresspassing/no hunting signs, but if a responsible bow hunter were to ask permission, I'd give it. I'd have to be convinced that he/she actually knew what they were doing, were responsible and respectful, and would abide by our rules (which would probably just consist of signing a waiver of liability and agreeing to talk with me first to set up firm dates and times so I could have our horses and children put up :) )

    Frankly, deer are a growing nuisance in our area, with no natural predators other than cars (which arguably aren't that natural). I see them all the time grazing with the horses, and our dogs just watch them. VERY frustrating. :no:

    Now, if a hunter came onto our property without permission, I'd prosecute him. No if's, and's or but's.
     
  11. Oilpatch197

    Oilpatch197 Well-Known Member

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    Those darn Shotgun Deer Hunters got the "deer Fever" shoot anything that moves, but they are necisary to keep the Population down to a healthy level, Bow hunting is awesome.

    "Sounds to me like honesty is getting you an honest answer! My No Hunting/No Trespassing signs mean just what they say and we don't make exceptions. My BILs all know this too.

    At least being honest saves you from paying a fine, going to jail, getting shot or all of the above!"

    Yeah but if it's anything like around here, "No Tresspassing" signs don't exist, even if their easily seen. I would tell the hunters, if your affraid of Liability, "If I don't know your there, then I don't know your there!"
     
  12. ckncrazy

    ckncrazy Well-Known Member

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    In NY if you have permission or not the land owner is not held responsiable for you. If someone does sue they will have their case thrown out in court. The only way you can be held acountable is if you directly caused the accident (IE permanent stand that fell apart with a hunter in it.). I let people hunt, Just no stands.

    JAKE
     
  13. MorrisonCorner

    MorrisonCorner Mansfield, VT for 200 yrs

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    We allow hunting with permission, and a week ago our bow hunters came back to check on their tree stands.

    Someone went to a great deal of trouble to steal them. $300 worth of equipment gone. Since we only allow "friends" on our property, it is most likely that one of our "friends" took the stands. These are old timers that date from my grandmother's day and think they own the place. They never hit anything, they sit up at camp getting drunk (they do have a rule, the guns are locked up at night), and they think nothing of bringing heavy (read: trackhoe) equipment up on our property to grade "their" road.

    My husband is fit to be tied. I'm thinking we'll put a decoy stand up and attach a GPS tracking device to it.

    !@#$%^&* arrogant !@#$%^&*

    If they'd hit something now and then I might be more forgiving. But they don't. Or if they do they're proudly showing off a bear cub the size of a golden retriever. The thing was too young and dumb to duck.

    You know, when someone complains about "the youth" I'd point to my 20 something bowhunters as the most responsible, polite, nice, kids on the planet. And these old men as the rudest, most obnoxious... !@#$%^&*

    ok.. i'm done ranting now...
     
  14. EasyDay

    EasyDay Gimme a YAAAAY!

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    As I'm not living on my land yet, I'm reading this thread closely because I know that day will come when a hunter asks. I completely understand the liability concerns, and hear too often about the "victim" getting sued! So, if you give permission along with making the hunter sign a liability release form of some type, will that truly hold up in court? Lawyers are pros at twisting the facts, and I'm wondering if their signature would really keep you off the hook where the rubber meets the road. Anyone ever had to fight that battle?

    ~Easyday
     
  15. mtman

    mtman Well-Known Member

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    i plan to cut a road all around the propity this along with with my atv and a shotgun would act as a pretty good detarunt not to mention the fact that i have 0 talerance with tresspasses and yes i am as ugly as i act
     
  16. bethlaf

    bethlaf Homegrown Family

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    there was a case in northern wisconsin , where a hunter sued the new owners of a property, to gain acess for hunting, he had been hunting the land since he was a child, as had most of his family, what he (the hunter) sued for was, believe it or not a "hunting easement"
    he had pictures of him and family near an old foundation of a barn which was a pretty distinctive feature of the land, there by proving his use of it , under eminent domain, i know he "could" have won, unfortunately, i moved out of the area, and never followed up with it, its something to think about though , i mean his case wasnt thrown out by the judge straight off.... so that makes it kind of scary .....

    i know this isnt quite what you were asking about , but its def. food for thought
     
  17. Mike in Ohio

    Mike in Ohio Well-Known Member

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    R.H., not meaning to offend you but it is an obligation (to ask) not a kindness. The reason we have the property posted is to communicate that we do not want hunters, trespassers, etc. on our property.

    My response to strangers asking to hunt our land is no. Between family and friends (real ones, not ones who cozy up as hunting season approaches) the amount of game harvested is appropriate for our property.

    One of the property rights that one acquires with a property (unless they have been assigned seperately in the titlework) is the right to hunt. That right can be given.leased or sold just like any other easement or right associated with a property (for example, timber rights, air rights, etc.)

    Others have suggested that you offer to lease land. I'm sure that there are people who might consider leasing you hunting rights.

    From the flip side, I have been offered $15/acre for a hunting lease. It's not worth it to me to tie up that right for $15/acre. It would mean telling relatives and friends they couldn't hunt the property.

    As usual, just my 2 cents.

    Mike
     
  18. mtman

    mtman Well-Known Member

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    and a good 2cents it is to tie up an acre of land for $15 just dont make any sence
     
  19. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    Many states have a recreational land use statute that limits the liability of landowners who allow people to use their land for recreational purposes. You can't be held liable, unless you do something really dumb (like build a trap for ATV's).

    Liability with hunting is really a non-issue.

    RH,

    Keep asking. There are lots of reasons why someone gets turned down. I have at least 20 people a year asking to hunt. If I said yes to them all, they'd just be shooting each other! Many people have let certain folks hunt for years and stick with those. Many have families that hunt. You'll find something eventually.

    Jena
     
  20. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hum. So the hunter climbs over your fence gate, slips in the dew, & falls on his arrow.

    There are a lot of lawyers willing to represent him - that your gate caused the accident. Thus it's not a hunting accident, it's a liability issue.....

    I donno. Seems like an issue to me.

    --->Paul