Do you feel bad the first time you hunt?

Discussion in 'The Great Outdoors' started by largentdepoche, Nov 16, 2006.

  1. largentdepoche

    largentdepoche Well-Known Member

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    I'm not meaning to start a flame or something, I'm just asking a question.

    I have never hunted before (minus hitting things with my car LOL!) and I was wondering, does it make you feel bad the first time you kill an animal?

    I know God gave us animals for food though, so I'm not debating that. I think I could hunt if the animal died further away where I couldn't hear it dying.

    Hubby can snap fishnecks and kill things, so he's used to that (whoo army training lol!). I cry if a mouse gets killed in a trap (I'm a wuss lol).

    Do you toughen up as you hunt more?

    Thanks!

    Kat
     
  2. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    I see hunting to stalk and kill an animal for food not much different that killing a domestic animal for food. The difference perhaps is in the method, type of animal to hunt as a preference, but the outcome to not waste or make a clean kill. If the intent is to hunt without a clean kill to make the animal suffer, or to waste game, than one should probably deserve to feel 'bad'.
     

  3. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    Once upon a time in history, the Ancient Greeks would carry their male children with them to war. After the battle there would be wounded enemy laying on the battlefield and these Ancient Greeks would send the children in to finish them off; it hardened them to the world of war and the taking of life.

    Killing, animals or men, carries some really heavy vibes for some people, but there are those who love doing both. It seems that young folks, taught to hunt and kill animals, have more of an immunity to those aforementioned vibes.

    I see no sport in killing animals, but I'm a meat eater, so I kill animals. I do it humanely and I don't take trophies, other than a full freezer. One supposes that life is as precious to a squirrel or elk as it is to a human; certainly an animal will do everything in its power to preserve that life. When one takes an animals life they should bear that in mind.
     
  4. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    Theres always a little sadness involved with taking the life of another creature. Its said the Indians always said a "Thank you" prayer to the animal for giving its life so they could eat. I was a little sad when I shot a buck this afternoon , but Ill get over it when I put the backstraps wrapped in bacon on the grill
     
  5. poorboy

    poorboy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I stayed with my Grandma and granddad for a little over 3 yrs. When I was almost eight , one morning grandma caught one of her ole hens and told me to take it to the woodshed and chop its head off for her.
    She did this maybe 2or3 different times and I never give it any thought at the time, but recently(50 yrs later)I thought about it. I reckon she just wanted to make sure that I knew where our food came from. Grandad used to let me shoot the fathogs when i was 10 or so at butchering time. Started pulling hair and carrying and fetching at hog killing time when I was only 5. The only time slaughter or killing an animal ever bothered me was when the job was botched.
    I made a bad shot onna deer this yr. first time in a long, long time. I was a long time going to sleep that night. :shrug:
     
  6. Rockin'B

    Rockin'B Well-Known Member

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    To me, killing is never easy. I've hunted for most all of my 52 years and I still have moments after taking a deer or bird that stop me up a bit.

    But, nature is nature. I'm just one of a gazillion organisms in this wonderful world and Ma nature has much tougher killers than I.
    I think it takes a bit of respect, but it is the way of the world and has been since it's start.
    Way too many people think nothing of buying muscle tissue on a white Styrofoam tray but crap all over themselves about killing an animal. They are the ultimate in hypocrites, in my opinion.
    At the least, we take care of ourselves from the get go rather than pay exorbitant prices so someone else can do our hard work and end up with an inferior product.
     
  7. gilberte

    gilberte Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you don't fell at least a little saddened by the taking of a life on the level of a deer, there may be something wrong with your "wiring". The animal should be treated with respect, which to me means waiting to take a sure, killing shot; thanking the deer for giving its' life; and then properly taking care of the carcass so that nothing is wasted.
     
  8. beorning

    beorning Well-Known Member

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    I feel bad if the critter suffers a second more than it needs to. Whether it's hunting or slaughtering livestock, I want to do it quick and clean.

    Ditto on the respect comment.
     
  9. margo

    margo Well-Known Member

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    In agreement with some of the other posters here, I too, make acknowledgement of the life of the animals in that the "sacrifice, if you will" of their life should be quick and respectful. While it is a great thrill to place a shot after practicing, waiting, skill and patience, for me, there would be little to celebrate if the deer or squirrel or chicken suffered maiming or delayed death. And the fact that it isn't wasted is good stewardship.

    And I am very sure that our livestock have a quality of life far above that of feedlot and factory-farmed animals.
    Everyone deals with issues differently, so if you aren't at ease enough to slaughter or shoot, it's not a crime. I probably would have a hard time killing a beef, since I just really like them. and would make a pet of a calf. :shrug:

    Margo
     
  10. jross

    jross swamper

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    I love hunting. I do not love killing, but it is necessary for the survival of any prey species, that is why God created them, to quickly multiply and feed others. We hunters kill as predators that were removed for the well being of humans. Those who strive to stop the killing of wildlife kill by ignorance, recklessness, diassociation and depraved indifference.
     
  11. shelljo

    shelljo Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I grew up seeing dead livestock quite frequently. Mainly cattle. I helped dress chickens as a child, didn't care for it, but it didn't bother me.

    I was 36 the first time I hunted. Deer--rifle season. I worried that I wouldn't be able to shoot "Bambi", I worried that it would bother me, but I suprised myself, because when the doe was there, I simply pulled up and fired. She did go a few steps before going down. That bothered me, because I thought I might have missed, or just wounded her and I wanted it to be a good, clean kill. It actually was, but I didn't realize that deer don't just go down immediately very often.

    I rifle hunted 4 or 5 years, then decided to try bowhunting. I worry more about having a good clean, humane shot, to keep the animal from suffering very long. I got a buck last weekend. It wasn't as good of a shot as I wanted, I severed the spine and he went down 10 yards from my treestand. However, I just paralyzed him, so I watched him for over an hour until DH came to pick me up. We had to cut his throat. I should have shot him again from the treestand, but didn't know what to do. Mr. Buck didn't really hurt, but I didn't necessarily enjoy waiting for him to die. (I thought he would die on his own).

    One thing I've always done, is, after making my kill, I silently thank brother deer, brother steer, whatever, for giving up their life so that me and mine might live. Maybe that's pagan, maybe some don't think it's necessary, but it makes me feel better, and it makes me feel like the spirit of that animal understands that his death was not just for "fun".
     
  12. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    Haggis...I've been a hunter all of my life & I'm a combat vet from Vietnam. I've been forced to kill men that were trying to kill me. More than once.I don't LIKE killing,but I'd rather live than die.I'm sure that the animals that I kill to eat would also rather live than die. I have very mixed feelings about it all untill I get hungry, or someone threatens my life, or the lives of my family or friends.But hunting for meat has always seemed to me to be a nobel effort to provide food. I almost never kill the animals that people consider to be Varmits...coons,possums etc. I don't keep domestic animals, so they don't really bother me. I've been forced to put down a couple of beloved dogs & that was certainly not nice,but it was necessary. Lot's of things in this life are necessary & unpleasant.
     
  13. alleyyooper

    alleyyooper keeper of the bees Staff Member Supporter

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    I hunt and am saddened each time I kill some thing. I will always admire the beauty of the animal and give thanks to the great spirit. Seeing animals die from over population is worse to me than harvesting them. Sometime one should do a spring count of winter kill deer after a tough winter. Just do it once and you will no longer look at hunting as cruel, Mother Nature is the cruel one.

    :D Al
     
  14. WolfWalksSoftly

    WolfWalksSoftly Level II -Inappropriate

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    Not Pagan...That would be American Indian..and good for you
     
  15. vicker

    vicker Well-Known Member

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    Well stated, Haggis. I hunt for food and don't find much glory in it. It disturbs me to watch the tv shows and videos about hunting that show the kill. I would never record that myself. Its just seems too personal to me. I respect the life I am taking more than that. To each his own though.
     
  16. largentdepoche

    largentdepoche Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for these replies, they are very insightful!

    Katrina
     
  17. 1eaglescout

    1eaglescout Active Member

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    Hello all, new here.
    Maybe I'm one of those guys with "something wrong with my wiring" but I have killed many animals that I never felt a twinge pain for. Cats and squirrels mostly. Squirrels I just hate. Anybody that has ever had them invade their attic can tell you why. As for the cats, I am over run with them. I am the last house on a dead end road. People think it is the perfect place to dispose of unwanted litters of kittens. They end up with wolf worms and starved. Wolf worms {flies actually I think} lay eggs in the wounds of animals on the neck or head. It creates a festering sore that rarely heals. It brings pain to the cat for its entire shortened life.
    I am almost happy when I kill those cats. I can't afford to take them all to the vet. From what I am told if you don't catch it in the first couple of weeks its too late anyhow. They suffer and starve, shooting them is the only humane thing to do.
    As for hunting, I have in the past and will in the future. I do it because I like being in the woods. Probably half of the time I let the deer stroll right through my line of fire. I would rather watch them than eat 'em. My father in law hunts enough that I rarely have to buy meat. As far as I'm concearned the doe and fawn that live in a pine patch in my yard are safe.
     
  18. JJ Grandits

    JJ Grandits Well-Known Member

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    AS a young man I worked in a small slaughter house in what was called the blood pit. I stuck 'em, bled 'em, gut 'em and send them down the line. That was a job that had to be done. When I hunt, pulling the trigger is my decision. Since I have the choice I always choose either the best shot to do it quickly or no shot at all. I think there should be a sense of sadness or reget when taking any life along with one of respect and thankfulness. I think hunting can be one of the most philosophical and rewarding endevers a person can engage in. It is definately a personal experience. No one knows what goes though the mind of a hunter at that last minute except the hunter.
     
  19. fixer1958

    fixer1958 None of the Above

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    I see no sport in killing animals, but I'm a meat eater, so I kill animals. I do it humanely and I don't take trophies, other than a full freezer. One supposes that life is as precious to a squirrel or elk as it is to a human; certainly an animal will do everything in its power to preserve that life. When one takes an animals life they should bear that in mind.[/QUOTE

    I used to hunt alot. The mentioned vibe is like a cloak on me. I made a couple of bad shots and I pretty much said no more. When I butcher chickens it takes me a half a day to mentally prepare.
    I always tell my boys "If you don't plan on eating it, don't kill it".
    My youngest son spent a good deal of time/money on a deer food plot this fall. Lots of nice deer around. He has been there 1 time. I've seen his reaction with squirrles and rabbits he has shot. I tell him it may or may not get better. He wears the same cloak.
     
  20. shadowwalker

    shadowwalker Well-Known Member

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    I have hunted since 1971 and I still feel bad about the life I just took. Any of them, game animal, varmit, fish. I guess I always will. It is part of hunting and fishing. For me anyway. But it is part of the art of hunting. I owe to the animal for death to be quick and as painless as possible.