Do you drench your sheep?

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by RandB, Apr 22, 2006.

  1. RandB

    RandB Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,251
    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2002
    Location:
    southern New Jersey
    I have never seen anybody actually drench a sheep to worm it or medicate it. I see the equipment in a catalog. How do you actually do it? How far into the mouth does that tube have to go? does it have to go down the throat?
     
  2. ShortSheep

    ShortSheep Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    360
    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2004
    Location:
    Illinois
    It's very easy to do. Hold the head/neck in the crook of the arm, elevate the head slightly, not too much, just enough to keep the liquid from running out the mouth. Far back in the mouth is ideal, not down the throat. Go slowly, squirt in a little at at time and allow them time to swallow.
    I don't find it necessary to pinch the nostrils shut like some instructions say to do.
     

  3. ONThorsegirl

    ONThorsegirl Fergusons Family Farm

    Messages:
    1,326
    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2005
    Location:
    Eastern Ontario
    We drench our sheep as well, with ivermec. It is alot easier then injectable. It is so much quicker.

    Melissa
     
  4. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    15,981
    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2004
    Location:
    Michigan's thumb
    I use a non needle syringe or a baby medicine squirtie thing. It goes far enough back into the mouth and is easy to carry.
     
  5. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,779
    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2004
    Location:
    New Zealand
    Interesting - when I first visited this site and used the word "drenching", nobody knew what the hell I was talking about :)

    Drenching sheep is not difficult and is a quick and effective method of dealing with parasite control. Cup the sheep's jaw with your hand at the same time as tilting the head slightly up. Slide the length of the tubular part of the drench gun into the side of the mouth - never the front - and depress the plunger so that all the drench goes into the mouth in one hit. It will go into the side of the mouth and the sheep will automatically swallow.

    The average dose for an adult sheep is about 12mls - just a little over two teapsoons - which the sheep can adequately swallow. I can't see why you would want to pinch the nostrils - if you were doing 1,000 sheep you would be there for a week at that rate. I can do 30 sheep in 15 minutes including emptying the race and filling it up again.

    And yes, I will use an old syringe for the odd sheep, it's just not efficient when doing large numbers.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  6. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    960
    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2002
    Be careful if you have dogs who are alergic to ivermectin; it could be fatal!
     
  7. Philip

    Philip Philip

    Messages:
    130
    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2005
    Location:
    New Zealand
    Hi Ronney - 'drench', the last taboo ? LOL
    I'm trying to get away from the whole idea of drenching if possible, 'easy care' farming if I can. The Wiltshires seem to take it better than some other breeds. I do give them a squirt of cider vinegar, olive oil and garlic once a year or so, usually by spraying it on hay, although if one particularly needs attention I squirt it orally with a syringe. I've never bothered holding nostrils either, they swallow without that added wrestling hold.
    I occasionally have a FEC done, and as long its a managable worm burden I'm happy. Given the growing tide of drench resistance I am hoping to avoid the increasingly complex doses of white and clear drench combinations
     
  8. farmergirl

    farmergirl Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    5,001
    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2005
    Location:
    Austin-ish, Texas
    Hi Philip,
    I prefer to use a feed-through dewormer, just for the ease of administration. Lately, I've been using a product fed to wildlife/ zoo animals. The deworming agent is fenbendazole. I have hair sheep, barbadoes, and they just gobble it up. Currently I'm deworming quarterly, since we have a big problem with internal parasites here in central Texas. So far, so good! I believe there are other feed-through products, so I do plan to rotate dewormers periodically.
     
  9. Philip

    Philip Philip

    Messages:
    130
    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2005
    Location:
    New Zealand
    Thats interesting. I haven't heard of a 'feed-through' drench before, I don't think we have them in NZ. I presume 'feed-through' means its in the form of nuts or other hard feed ? I have heard that Barbadoes are good for hot climates and hard ground (presumably they originate from Barbados in the West Indies ?). We don't have them here, although the Wiltshires possibly fill the same niche - self shedding, and hard doers
     
  10. RandB

    RandB Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,251
    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2002
    Location:
    southern New Jersey
    Hi Farmergirl..

    Can you tell us what that feed-through wormer is called, and where do you get it?

    Thanks!