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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
That chart is hard to see. It is better if you go to the link. It shows rainfall from 1880 to 2020 for Marin County California.

Now read this article.

"These droughts are now on a new timeline," says Newsha Ajami, a hydrologist and director of urban water policy at Stanford University's Water in the West program. "There used to be at least 10 years in between droughts in California, which was time enough for water ecosystems to recover."

No longer. The last California drought, which persisted six years, ended in 2017. The current one began three years later and poses an existential threat to places like Marin County, which rely on local water sources for most or all of their supply. The past year has been the second driest on record in California.
 

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Look like they had severe flooding in the late 1800s followed by a prolonged drought in the early 1900's. That drought was caused when Henry Ford fired up his first automobile. Since then the graph goes up and down pretty regularly, depending how many run their gas powered weed eaters and chain saws in a given year.
 
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Eyeball the graph-- average (arithmetic mean) is 52 inches/y....It looks like there's just as much white below the line as there is blue above it (by definition of mean, there should be) with the variance of up to ~30 inches +/- /yr
EXCEPT for a couple yrs of excessive rainfall in the 1880s-- right after Pinatubo blew up and covered the atm with dirt for several years-- more rain everywhere that decade.

We're not drier than usual. It was just wetter than usual in the 1880s.

Next!!??

edit-- 52 inch/yr??? here in the midwest known for it's excellent precip, only gets 38 in/yr. Who believes that graph?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
52 inch/yr??? here in the midwest known for it's excellent precip, only gets 38 in/yr. Who believes that graph?
Something is whacked

Marin County, California gets 39 inches of rain, on average, per year. The US average is 38 inches of rain per year.
 

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The average here is six incher per year. This year we are well over twelve inches. If this is global warming, I'll take it.
Our average here is sixty five inches of rain per year. So far, we've had over seventy four inches this year.
 

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Uh....California is flooding right now. At least the north state is😂😂

I was pretty worried about having another dry year next year, hope we get a lot of snowpack this winter. The lakes are pretty empty, I will grant that. But it's the natural cycle of things in California
 

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California has always had variations in rainfall. They have historically used giant reservoirs to provide water during droughts.

But a few years ago the state opted to release large volumes of water from those reservoirs for some environmental reason. Something to do with taking care of some kind of fish in the rivers.

So when the current drought hit, there was less water in the reservoirs and it was quickly depleted.

The folks in California are getting exactly the situation that their elected officials promised.

Just one of many sources
 

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California has always had variations in rainfall. They have historically used giant reservoirs to provide water during droughts.

But a few years ago the state opted to release large volumes of water from those reservoirs for some environmental reason. Something to do with taking care of some kind of fish in the rivers.

So when the current drought hit, there was less water in the reservoirs and it was quickly depleted.

The folks in California are getting exactly the situation that their elected officials promised.

Just one of many sources
The water releases are for delta smelt (which we don't know if it is in fact extinct now or not, there is no chance of its recovery) and salmon. This has been going on for more than a few years. The rain is helpful, but we really need the snowpack. That has been less than normal the last few years.

See: https://www.google.com/amp/s/califo...ear-that-wild-delta-smelt-become-extinct/?amp
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I had no idea until just now, how difficult it is to find year to date rainfall totals for anywhere.
It is hard.

NOAA has the data, and many orgs organize it and present it, but it is tough to find.

That is why my heart sank when @doc- pointed out the oddity in the chart published by the county.
 

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You folks out there in Californification are always either on fire or drowning. Must be the Devils playground. Can't somebody just get a hacksaw and send you drifting out into the Pacific?
We have a running gag around here that involves a ginormous Sawzall and various ways to yield it, cutting along the dotted line between CA and other states, freeing CA from the "tyranny" of the Constitution, and the rest of the country from the tyranny of Kalifornication.
 

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You folks out there in Californification are always either on fire or drowning. Must be the Devils playground. Can't somebody just get a hacksaw and send you drifting out into the Pacific?
If they did it would probably tip over from being too heavy on the south end.
 

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STILL not Alice
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If they did it would probably tip over from being too heavy on the south end.
I suppose that No. CA could and really, should be preserved.

Where's the cut-off line? I'll have to add that to my equations...
 
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