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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
A microbiologist discussed this article with me at a luncheon yesterday, and it's interesting.

"One big mystery: Why do some people get very sick and even die from their illness, while other similar people show no symptoms and may not realize they've been infected at all?
We know some of the big factors that put people at higher risk of having a severe, even fatal, course of disease: being over 60; being overweight or obese; having one or more chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, kidney or lung disease, and cancer; and being a person of color -- Black African American, Latino Latinx or Native American.

But might the opposite also be true: Could certain people actually have some type of protection?"

 

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I wished I knew. I've bringing up some nephews into the rental business. They have asked when was the last time I missed a day. I didn't know. One called my sister and she told him I was out two days in the 80s with mono.
 

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On another note. Dad will be 77 this month. Other than three days in ICU for a bleeding ulcer in 95 he's never missed a day...
 

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"One big mystery: Why do some people get very sick and even die from their illness, while other similar people show no symptoms and may not realize they've been infected at all?
It's no "big mystery".
It's normal variation in circumstances.

Could certain people actually have some type of protection?"
Anyone can have protection:


Chloroquine is a potent inhibitor of SARS coronavirus infection and spread

"Results
We report, however, that chloroquine has strong antiviral effects on SARS-CoV infection of primate cells. These inhibitory effects are observed when the cells are treated with the drug either before or after exposure to the virus, suggesting both prophylactic and therapeutic advantage. In addition to the well-known functions of chloroquine such as elevations of endosomal pH, the drug appears to interfere with terminal glycosylation of the cellular receptor, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2. This may negatively influence the virus-receptor binding and abrogate the infection, with further ramifications by the elevation of vesicular pH, resulting in the inhibition of infection and spread of SARS CoV at clinically admissible concentrations.
Conclusion
Chloroquine is effective in preventing the spread of SARS CoV in cell culture. Favorable inhibition of virus spread was observed when the cells were either treated with chloroquine prior to or after SARS CoV infection. In addition, the indirect immunofluorescence assay described herein represents a simple and rapid method for screening SARS-CoV antiviral compounds."
 

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There is a monstrous reputational risk for those who will be found to have dismissively waved off a treatment that could have been used from the very beginning, even back on February 15 when Dr. Fauci said that the risk from Coronavirus was “miniscule.” How many lives could have been saved if the heads of our multi-billion dollar health care bureaucracy had been advocating for HCQ treatment from day one? We’ll never know. Instead, their advice has been dangerous and deadly in every sense of that word.
 

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It's an interesting article.
The two men I knew that died did have heart and lung issues. They both had exposure to quite a few people daily.

I'm glad we have intelligent doctors and scientist working on a cure and also our understanding of the disease.

African researchers may have helpful insights into how we deal with out breaks and hot spots.
Many of them have been in the field fighting just such out breaks.
 

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"One big mystery: Why do some people get very sick and even die from their illness, while other similar people show no symptoms and may not realize they've been infected at all?

I don't think that's much of a mystery - some people do the things necessary to take care of themselves - not only now, with the virus, but most of their lives.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I wished I knew. I've bringing up some nephews into the rental business. They have asked when was the last time I missed a day. I didn't know. One called my sister and she told him I was out two days in the 80s with mono.
On another note. Dad will be 77 this month. Other than three days in ICU for a bleeding ulcer in 95 he's never missed a day...
The article indicates that all type of coronaviruses may cause antibody reaction to Covid 19. So if you and/or your dad have had colds and other more mild coronaviruses, they may provide some protection.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
"One big mystery: Why do some people get very sick and even die from their illness, while other similar people show no symptoms and may not realize they've been infected at all?

I don't think that's much of a mystery - some people do the things necessary to take care of themselves - not only now, with the virus, but most of their lives.
I do agree that having no comorbidity can lessen the symptoms of Covid 19, and the article indicates that any coronavirus may provide more protection if infected.

"It's T cells like those, which reacted to the SARS-CoV-2 virus, that Sette and his co-author Shane Crotty discovered -- quite by accident -- in the blood of people collected several years before this pandemic began. They were running an experiment with Covid-19 convalescent blood. Because they needed a "negative control" to compare against the convalescent blood, they picked blood samples from healthy people collected in San Diego between 2015 and 2018.

"There was no way these people had been exposed to SARS-CoV2. And when we ran those ... it turns out the negative control was not so negative: about half of the people had reactivity," Sette explained. "Shane and I pored over the data; we were looking at it from the right, from the left, from the top, from the bottom -- and it was really 'real'; this reactivity was real. So, this showed that people that have never seen this virus have some T-cell reactivity against the virus." That paper was published at the end of June in the journal Cell. Sette and Crotty note in their current summary article that they aren't the only ones to have seen this. "That has been now confirmed in different continents, different labs, with different techniques, which is one of the hallmarks of when you start to actually really believe that something is scientifically well-established because it's found independently by different studies and different labs," said Sette."
 

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Number of covid deaths Per Million per Worldometer today: United States: 477. Ukraine 39, India 28, Greece 20, Indonesia 19, Morocco 10, Malaysia 4.

I'm sorry but.....INDIA, for goodness sakes! Maybe the meds don't work once they've stuck you in the hospital and shoved a ventilator down your throat, but it certainly seems to be helpful in a country with one of the BIGGEST slums in the world.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Here's a link specific to India and it's poor areas:

"More than half of residents living in Mumbai's crowded slums may have contracted coronavirus and are likely being infected at a much higher rate than those not living in slum areas, a new study has found.
The study released Tuesday raises questions over the level of testing in India, which has the third highest number of confirmed cases in the world after the United States and Brazil.
On Wednesday, India reported it had crossed 1.5 million reported coronavirus cases after more than half a million infections were recorded in just 12 days. It took nearly six months for India to reach its first 1 million confirmed cases."


It may tie back to the article in the OP why India (and it's poor areas in particular) may have a lower death rate, poverty equals poor hygiene and social distancing. Those things don't just equate to Covid 19, but all coronaviruses.
 

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I'm sorry but.....INDIA, for goodness sakes! Maybe the meds don't work once they've stuck you in the hospital and shoved a ventilator down your throat, but it certainly seems to be helpful in a country with one of the BIGGEST slums in the world.
I've been trying to keep up with the published studies and articles, and that DOES seem to be a consistent point. When it is administered at onset of symptoms, it appears to help significantly. When administered after admission, as a last resort, it doesn't help at all.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I've been trying to keep up with the published studies and articles, and that DOES seem to be a consistent point. When it is administered at onset of symptoms, it appears to help significantly. When administered after admission, as a last resort, it doesn't help at all.
Would you mind linking the studies/articles? I try to keep up as well, and I could have missed those that you've read. Thank you.
 

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It may tie back to the article in the OP why India (and it's poor areas in particular) may have a lower death rate, poverty equals poor hygiene and social distancing. Those things don't just equate to Covid 19, but all coronaviruses.
It may be they aren't pushing other agendas too.
 

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I think 5 years from now we might be surprised what we find could have or did or didn’t help or hinder in all of this.

I think we have had much more of a political and bureaucratic response to the pandemic than a scientific response.

that is unfortunate and will cost us in lives and in dollars.

Paul
 

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Here's a link specific to India and it's poor areas:

"More than half of residents living in Mumbai's crowded slums may have contracted coronavirus and are likely being infected at a much higher rate than those not living in slum areas, a new study has found.
The study released Tuesday raises questions over the level of testing in India, which has the third highest number of confirmed cases in the world after the United States and Brazil.
On Wednesday, India reported it had crossed 1.5 million reported coronavirus cases after more than half a million infections were recorded in just 12 days. It took nearly six months for India to reach its first 1 million confirmed cases."


It may tie back to the article in the OP why India (and it's poor areas in particular) may have a lower death rate, poverty equals poor hygiene and social distancing. Those things don't just equate to Covid 19, but all coronaviruses.
 

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Sorry everyone - didn't realize there was an EDIT option - how wonderful!

They can have millions of CASES, what they don't have are the same percentage of deaths per million of their population. India has 28 deaths per million while US has 470. I don't believe they are socially distanced as 'Dharavi contains pockets where as many as 650,000 people are crammed into 2.5 square kilometers. In comparison, New York City has only around 95,605 people for 2.5 square kilometers.' New York itself has 1,685 deaths per million, so both area crowded areas. If it was herd immunity taking hold of the people in India, making them immune, gotta wonder why New Yorkers couldn't achieve the same.

Incredible story, but you didn't see it in the news.....I just cant believe this is being withheld from us.
 
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