Do rabbits need worming?

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by moopups, May 21, 2005.

  1. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    In beautiful downtown Sticks, near Belleview, Fl.
    The rescently purchased young buck is displaying whorls in his fur like I have seen in cattle indicating internal worms. All ours live in elevated cages, 39 inches above the ground, but it is possible he could have brought worms with him before we purchased him. So how about a few words of wisdom from you experts?

    It is possible that this is the summer's approaching also and this is zone 10.
     
  2. manygoatsnmore

    manygoatsnmore Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Does your buck have a potbelly? That's the usual thing you see with worms in rabbits.
     

  3. Tarot Farm

    Tarot Farm Well-Known Member

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    It could be 'coccidiosis', especially if the rabbit was around poultry. That can be treated with using Sul-Met in the water for 10 days; there is a site on the net that has the correct dosage, it is under the 'Del-Mars' rabbitry supplies.

    Rabbits can also have worms and show no visible signs. A fecal test would be a great aid for determining what is going on with the buck. A good wormer for rabbits that are not going to be used for food, is Ivermectin wormer for horses.
    A rabbit sized dose according to sources found online, is a drop about the size of a 'pea' placed on a tooth pick or twig and placed in the rabbits mouth.

    Do note that neither one of these treatments are recommended by the FDA or any other commissions. It is just some common treatments used amoung the rabbit breeders and fanciers.

    I have treated my breeding rabbits with these treatments and had great results.

    Brenda