Homesteading Forum banner

1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
iI have a 12 inch electric pole saw used for trimming branches I cannot reach from the ground. A pretty cheap version, Harbor Frt "Remington:"

A year or so ago I was at a sale down by the park here and a lady was selling a sixteen inch Sears electric chain saw. Not a mark on the blade, new paint, chain never been used. Apparently taken out of the box and put in a closet. I asked the lady "Does it run?" and she replied "Last time I plugged it In".

Paid her $5 and took it home. Found out that she sold it because the chain would not stay oon the bar. A year passes, and I NEED an electric chain saw, so I decide I't take it to a saw shop and ask if they thought perhaps it had the wrong chain, though it certainly seemed to match the sprocket..

Fast forward---the tech cleaned the saw, showed me the "trick" to making the bar fit the mounting, got my saw running and charged me ten bucks. NEW ELECTRIC 16 INCH CHAIN SAW and I have fifteen bucks in it.m, Made my day.





























%
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,985 Posts
I love my 16" Remington electric chain saw. I keep the blade sharp and am not a bit worried about cutting a 24" tree into running off a inverter hooked to my electric Golf Cart---doing this on the back of the farm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Pretty big inverter, is it not? That 16 inch saw must draw close to 15 amps. I will run mine off a generator--don't own anything else suitable.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
24,030 Posts
My first thought was that the bar needed to be adjusted. The owners manual should have the instructions on how to adjust the bar. I bet the instructions were long gone and never read.

(Just cause I won't run one doesn't mean I don't know how to maintain or fix one)

That's a great bargain. $15 for a good running chain saw.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,445 Posts
My one hand Stihl 8 inch battery powered GTA 26 has a easy twist wing nut sprocket cover /bar anchor and the manual says to pull the bar so the chain seats and can be spun by hand with the battery removed. The manual also advises to turn the blade half over to ensure even groove wear.

With three batteries for mine now, when cutting brush and pruning trees here, when I pull the battery to put a fresh one in, I generally brush any saw dust off the sprocket and bar groove and tighten the chain by removing the wing nut and cover and pulling the bar out so the chain sits and spins before putting the sprocket cover back on.

If the chain heat up sags before the battery needs replacing, I pull the battery out and loosen the wing nut just enough to slide the bar to tighten the chain and oil it so I can keep on sawing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,009 Posts
I have been thinking of getting a smaller (possibly electric) saw to put on a pole, and take care of higher limbs around the homestead. Climbing a ladder with my Stihl MS310 and a 20" bar sounds sketchy.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,615 Posts
I love my little pole saw, used without the pole, for trimming off the small branches. Much much safer (and lighter) than a big bucking saw that kicks the small limbs all over the place. It is corded, however. It is also a Remington that cost about $100.

And it is much safer for the higher branches when used with the pole.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,840 Posts
. Climbing a ladder with my Stihl MS310 and a 20" bar sounds sketchy.
I wish I was there to take a picture for this story.

A guy lives up on a mountain across a ravine from a Lodge BnB. He is a building contractor with a million dollar home and a view that stretches out over a canyon that is stunning. The guy and his wife that clean the lodge were telling me he came over right after he had finished the house asking for a ladder. He had a scrawny old tree blocking the view from his back deck and he wanted to prune it.
Now, he built the back of the house less than 20' from the edge and the drop off is, if you can look over the side, at least 100-150' straight down.
This tree is growing out of the rock on the side of the ledge.
So he takes their flimsy aluminum 5' paint ladder back over to his house and doesn't bother standing it up, he just leans it against the tree. He comes out with a hand saw and climbs up the ladder level with where the paint tray would be, and starts sawing. No rope, no harness, just balanced on a crooked ladder hacking away at dead limbs.
The wife of the couple cleaning the lodge couldn't watch and went inside.
At this point I should add that the tree was dead, so a snap and a scream wouldn't have been surprising.
A search and recover would have taken extensive resources.
The good thing I suppose is that the guy is about 5'2" and about 135 lbs so maybe the lack of weight and pressure helped.
Anyway, he finished pruning, climbed down, returned the ladder and then went inside for the evening.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
433 Posts
I think mine is a remington...Yeah its great..my brush pile is close to an outlet...So I cut down most with the

gas and drag it over to the pile where I can shorten the limbs with the electric..Excellant job...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Like most of you, I use the electric saw for light work where firing up the big saw would be overkill. The little 12 inch p[ole saw is good for what it was intended to do. The bigger saw will run off a generator and be less noise and easier work than the big gasoline powered saw.
If I get into really heavy work, out comes the old Stihl---nothing fazes it, but it fazes me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
We have two... One for branch trimming, the other lubed with veggie oil to use when butchering.. Very handy when doing a steer or moose..
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
13,445 Posts
I hated today having to cut a 30 foot tall brush tree out of the old garden game wire fence.

Using my 8 inch battery pruning chainsaw, in 45 minutes I had dropped five 25 foot tall 4 inch diameter at the cut tops into the yard and cut them into 3 to 4 foot lengths to dry before using straight pieces and compost the rest before coming into rest for an hour.

The part I hated was my second and third outings to get the last 5 feet that had grown through the game wire fence that I had to use wire cutters, hand powered bow saw and hack saw to cut the lower 5 feet out in small enough pieces to put out with the trash because of the wire that won't compost..

Hand saws at slow draw speed while safer while cutting around wire in the wood sure are slow in comparison to a high speed battery electric chain pruner.

My Stihl pruner chain saw has spoiled me, but I think it was well worth the investment as I clear brush especially the tall wanna be trees brush :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Jay; I have run several brands of gas saws, and Stihl is the champ in my oopinion---for home owners and geneeral use. Poulan was once a good saw but no more. There ios another Germ,amn saw whose name I cannot recall that does fine work, larger trees.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,077 Posts
Jay; I have run several brands of gas saws, and Stihl is the champ in my oopinion---for home owners and geneeral use. Poulan was once a good saw but no more. There ios another Germ,amn saw whose name I cannot recall that does fine work, larger trees.
The other German saw that you are trying to think of is Dolmar-Sachs. I have one. Mine is Model SP5105.

Stihl is no longer a German saw unless you buy a very high end professional model. Most Stihl saws are now made in the USA. The USA-made Stihl saws do not have the quality of the older German-made Stihl saws.

My other saw is a Swedish-made Jonsered Model CS2152. I have had absolutely no problems with either saw. Both start with just one or two pulls of the starter cord.

I find it to be very easy to add a pre-measured 2.6oz bottle of 2-stoke oil into a gallon of gasoline and carry that 1-gallon can into the woods.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Yes, Dolmar=Sachs, fine saws, heavy duty.

Yes, you pay for a Stihl, but they last almost forever and do what they are supposed to do

Now C Fever, what do you think of these new stick-on-the-bar and run chain saw sharpners? Anyone out there ever use one? I can sharpen a chain with uneven teeth (ajnd if you cut woods near people with guns and hammers you will have uneven teeth) but I suspect that those new chain sharpeners will grind all teeth to the same length, wearing out your chain sooner.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,077 Posts
Yes, Dolmar=Sachs, fine saws, heavy duty.

Yes, you pay for a Stihl, but they last almost forever and do what they are supposed to do

Now C Fever, what do you think of these new stick-on-the-bar and run chain saw sharpners? Anyone out there ever use one? I can sharpen a chain with uneven teeth (ajnd if you cut woods near people with guns and hammers you will have uneven teeth) but I suspect that those new chain sharpeners will grind all teeth to the same length, wearing out your chain sooner.
Are you talking about the Timberline sharpener...
91419


Or this old contraption?
91420
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
"THAT OLD CONTRAPTION WORKS FINE, BUT AFTER A BIT A MAN CAN DO AS WELL FRE-HANDED. i'VE SEEN ADS FOR THE T tMBERLINE BUT NEVER SEEN ONE IN ACTION. yOUR OPINION:?

tHE ONES I HAD IN MIND ARE THOSE THAT JUST STICK ON THE END OF THE BAR AND SUPPOSEDLY SHARPEN THE CHAN WHILE YOU RUN THE SAW FOR A FEW SECONDS.;
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top