DMSO and goats

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Cygnet, Mar 10, 2005.

  1. Cygnet

    Cygnet Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have a goat with a sprained shoulder -- probably got butted.

    He's bearing weight on it, and it doesn't look broken. Just a sprain. Definitely the shoulder, because I can feel the heat and he goes, "Ow!" when I cup my hand under his elbow and push up. The leg moves in all the directions it should and none that it shouldn't, no crunchies, no extremely painful reactions, not a lot of swelling (some) so I suspect it's just a soft tissue injury.

    If he were a horse with a kick injury, I'd put DMSO on it. Can I safely put DMSO on a goat? (THis is not a goat who will ever enter the human food chain, he's a pack animal and a pet.)

    Thanks,
    Leva
     
  2. vickiesmom

    vickiesmom Well-Known Member

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    OMG, do they still sell that sruff? I remember working on the racetrack when they banned it...it was so strong that if you dropped it on your shoe you could taste it in your mouth! The old timers used it on their knees...but I'm way too afraid of that stuff to ever use it!
     

  3. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    I know a lot of folks use DMSO, but just remember that it is an industrial solvent. If you get it on your skin, it will take whatever is on your skin and penetrate the skin with it. The same goes for your animal. Anything on his skin goes in with the DMSO. I used to sell the stuff in a western shop, but I sure never liked it and would never use it myself.
     
  4. Cygnet

    Cygnet Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've had very good luck and no ill effects using it with horses. There's also been some interesting reseach with using it in people -- the problem is doing a blind study, because the dang stuff stinks so much it's obvious if you've been treated so they can't do "blind" research studies where the participants don't know if they've gotten the placebo or the real thing.

    It's even used intravenously in horses with neurological problems. POWERFUL antinflammatory. Reccomended by every horse vet I've ever known for things like this. But goats are a tad more delicate than horses.

    I always scrub the area before using it, then cut it with something like furazone (not listed for goats, I know) to avoid skin inflammation. It definitely works, if used with caution, in horses.

    I just got a bonus at work today, so it looks like I've got money to take Dancer to the vet. If he's not better by the middle of next week, I've got a day off, and I'll just haul him down there.

    Leva
     
  5. susanne

    susanne Nubian dairy goat breeder

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    i would like to know what DMSO is?
    susanne
     
  6. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    DMSO is dimethyl sulfoxide. It is an industrial solvent and is not listed for ANY veterinary application.

    I used to sell it to people who used it on themselves for arthritis. SCARED me to death.

    I know that vets recommend it all the time but remember, "It is a violation of federal law to use this product in a manner inconsistent with its labeling."

    I'm not trying to be a smart aleck, but this is serious stuff.
     
  7. Croenan

    Croenan Well-Known Member

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    I have had personal experience with DMSO...when I was young, 8-9, my step- dad put it on what appeared to be a cold sore on my mouth and I literally watched it disappear in about 2 hours. (my dad used it on his shoulder alot) (left a nasty, oyster taste in my mouth for days!) (might I also add that I have NEVER had another cold sore in my life!) Anyway, it is scary stuff, and even though I had a good experience with it, I would never use it again, knowing what I know now as an adult. I also wouldn't use it on your (or my) goat, especially since he just seems sore. I think I'd rather risk a heating pad in the goat pen! :haha: Too much risk of infectious material entering the blood stream.

    Do any of you remember that lady in Riverside CA who was so toxic that fumes from her blood ended up making several nursing staff very ill? They suspected that it was from the DSMO and the oxygen that was administered to her in the hospital. (turning it from DMSO to DMSO-4) Just creepy! That stuff is just too volatile to use.

    Just my thoughts!
     
  8. Thumper/inOkla.

    Thumper/inOkla. Well-Known Member

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    If the goat is able to walk and move basicly normal, it should heal up on it's own in 10 days or so.

    For a rule of thumb on a healling schedule, I allow
    >for not worse to minimum improvement< the 1st week to
    >gradual improvment< for the next 4 to 6 days,

    to by day 14 to 21, I expect to see rapid improvement and full recovery. If it seems to get worse or heal slower than that, I might intervene.