DIY bag siliage

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by bobp, Jan 5, 2018.

  1. bobp

    bobp Well-Known Member

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    Have you ever fed pigs siliage?

    I have quite a bit of whole corn, in supersacks.

    I'm contemplating taking an empty supersack, with plastic liner in place, and putting in a 6"ish layer of corn, a layer alfalfa, a gallon or so of Baker's grade molasses, mist it with water, another layer of corn wash rinse repeat. This should ferment in about 30 days and be ready to feed?
    Would this work to Produce a more palatable healthier feed, and use it on the boar and non gestational sows...
     
  2. pigsinwigs

    pigsinwigs New Member

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    Hi bobp, I am far from an expert (only had pigs for a few months), but I have made haylage to help preserve spent brewer's grain, which spoils more quickly than I can feed our pigs.

    What I did was use the extra-thick black contractor trash bags that you can get at Home Depot or other such construction supply. I then alternated thin layers of shredded hay with the spent barley. When we got near the top, we sucked out air with a the shop vac by having one person tightly bunching the plastic bag around the long neck and then the other tie the bag shut. (Keep the nozzle a bit above the last layer, it won't suck any meaningful amount of feed out.) Then just let it sit for a few weeks, weather was mainly in 50's/60's. Smelled lovely and the pigs loved it! I think more than they like the plain brewer's grain.

    I dream of when it will be above freezing again so I can make them some more!
     

  3. bobp

    bobp Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for your input. It's certainly very interesting...I read where hogs will eat siliage...I can't see where it would hurt. And fermentation does improve some feedstuffs... I believe I'll try it if I haven't fed it already when it warms up.
    I've been feeding yearly feeder pigs in partnership with freinds for 20+ years..i even raised one litter many years back from a sow that was bred when i got her to fatten and eat.....But until last year I never gave much thought to Being able to feed in a better way, a healthier way, as previously I had only been feeding to get to butcher weight quickly and in the most economical way possible... Feed store busted bags, 1/2 moldy bags, vegetables, milk, what ever I could get, ECT...

    I've had alot of great luck with feed scores.
    A bunch of whole corn, and last year I bought 8 supersacks of cooked ground corn for 140$.
    I traded sawdust for pumpkins.

    My son has brought in 3-4 loads of flats of eggs,(Mazda pickup), and tjis week he has brought in 40 bags of layer feed from a silo clean out. They were told to dump it as a medicated blend was coming. The full count has been high I guess. He has 40-50 more bags he says to bring home.

    It's got me thinking I oughta pick up some feeder steers....
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2018
  4. pigsinwigs

    pigsinwigs New Member

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    Dang! Looks like you are set with those kinds of scores! Well, at first glance I can't see why the wouldn't like silage, although I am far from a pig expert. But for formulation of silage, maybe try the cattle forum? I get the impression from my reading that silage is usually made to feed cows.
     
  5. bobp

    bobp Well-Known Member

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    Siliage is mainly cattle feed but my hogs don't like the whole corn as well... It's white corn, and is missing the beta carotene, which may affect the flavor? Or maybe they're spoiled?

    My siliage idea was to increase the palaebility and feed value?
    It's in the dry and not hurting anything where it's at but I'd like to get it fed and gone....
     
  6. Bruce King

    Bruce King Member

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    I chopped and ensiled 10 acres of silage corn (the whole stalk of the plant and the ears ground into chunks about the size of a kernel of corn). I used a silage pit on my farm with a concrete floor and a concrete back wall, heaped the green silage against the wall, and then packed it down with a tractor, and covered the whole thing with a silage tarp to restrict oxygen.

    About 60 days later it smelled fermented; a little alchohol, and the very top was brown/yellow, but the interior retained a bit of color; I fed it to my cows and offered it to the pigs. I say offered because they really didn't like it very much at all. They'd pick through and eat the kernels of corn, and maybe some of the leaves, but the corn stalk and tougher bits they'd just ignore. there was probably some food value they got it it, but I'll compare that to the cows that ate every bit of it and wanted more every day. No waste with the cows, about 50% waste with the pigs.

    Most forages can be harvested/stored as silage; green grass, wet hay, alfalfa; most of the guys around me put up the first cuttings off their pasture as silage because we don't get hay drying weather until july, and the first cutting is ready in march or april. I've offered ensiled hay - in wrapped round bales - and the pigs are interested in it, and do eat a bit of it, but they mostly will lay in it if they can, and use it as bedding.

    Not that it's bad bedding; fermenting breaks it down a bit, and mixed with manure and urine the uneaten portions are great compost; I'll scrape up the waste and spread it in the fields peridically and close the circle that way.
     
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  7. haypoint

    haypoint Unpaid, Volunteer Devil's Advocate Supporter

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    Silage generally means chopped corn, stalks, cob, kernels. With the ability to process fiber with their multiple stomachs, it makes great cattle feed.
    Pigs won't be digesting lots of fiber, they just aren't able to. But if you are able to create some fermented mix of quality alfalfa, corn, minerals and molasses and get the air out with proper sealing after packing tightly, without any mold, then get a sample tested, it may be great hog feed.
    I think silage is a good way to preserve nutrient quality, but I doubt that it will increase protein or digestibility for pigs.
    Never feed mold to hogs.
     
  8. bobp

    bobp Well-Known Member

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    From what I've read when corn is fermented it converts the starches, and making it more bioavailable for digestion, thus improving conversion rates on it.
    My understanding is that you can ensilage about anything in the grain or grass family.

    I don't believe I'm interested in it for long term or continued use. I took in alot of white corn the hogs don't appear to like. Don't get me wrong they'll eat it... But not like other feeds.
    I was thinking that I could add a little effort, a little more investment by adding alfalfa, (I already have the bakers molasses) and improve the palatibility and digestibility some.
     
  9. bobp

    bobp Well-Known Member

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    My wife just told me that I have created a sense of 'entitlement' I'm the hogs when they won't eat corn...lol
     
  10. haypoint

    haypoint Unpaid, Volunteer Devil's Advocate Supporter

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    What do you want the starches converted into? Never thought pigs had any difficulty digesting starch.
     
  11. Lazy J

    Lazy J Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Pigs do not have the ability to digest the volatile fatty acids formed during fermentation.
     
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  12. bobp

    bobp Well-Known Member

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    For me it's not a want... It's more of an idea to get more from what I have with minimal effort????
    Starches are converted into complex sugars which in turn makes more amino acids available. The fermentation allows the starches to be better utilized.... And improve the digestion, and bioavailability of the corn.
    That's my understanding at any rate.

    Actually it seems some fatty acids are made more soluble in the hindgut... Or so it seems..
     
  13. bobp

    bobp Well-Known Member

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    For me it's not a want... It's more of an idea to get more from what I have with minimal effort????
    Starches are converted into complex sugars which in turn makes more amino acids available. The fermentation allows the starches to be better utilized.... And improve the digestion, and bioavailability of the corn.
    That's my understanding at any rate.

    Actually it seems some fatty acids are made more soluble in the hindgut... Or so it seems..
     
  14. bobp

    bobp Well-Known Member

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    DDGs, mash ECT have been fed for years with nutritional benefit.

    I'm not trying to ensilage whole corn stocks ECT... Just corn kernels with alfalfa and molasses to make it work off better..It seems like it should work. I'll figure out a way to try it and share with you here....

    In the last 20 years I've fed lots of hogs... Predominantly not 'correctly' I get it...
    I even kept several wild caught hogs in a big pen for a few years.. these were bay pen boars mostly... But a pig is a pig for the most part.. they'd eat a complete road kill deer over night...Skull and all... They are lots of moldy chunks of feed from feed store cast offs... And what ever else I could feed with out investment...

    I've aged... My goals are different...I don't want a stinking muddy hog operation....
    With out fruit farm and rules on that side... I'm trying to feed better have a operation ECT..End up with a better product for my family. And sell a few to boot.
     
  15. krackin

    krackin Well-Known Member

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    Fermentation will eat up some of the sugars. You will gain on yeast which is great B complex. This is interesting, never really tried it.
     
  16. bobp

    bobp Well-Known Member

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    Your correct..I can't see. Good reason not to try... I'm thinking maybe a barrel full first?
    I buy and re sell 275 gal basket tanks. I've got several with a few inches of bakers molasses in them that I brought home to use rather than sell. Tip em up and it'll come out in a bucket. I can use it for siliage easy enough.
    I've fed soaked corn lots of times but it's a hassle... And you need to re soak and re soak... And it'll sour too far ND spoil if you don't use it up...I did soak some yellow corn in molasses water once... They loved it..