diverting run of from field

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Kelli, Mar 13, 2005.

  1. Kelli

    Kelli Active Member

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    Location:
    Illinois
    A farmer plants on 80 acres behind us. When we bought this place he was not spraying because the owner of the land wouldn't allow it (farmer said he wouldn't anyway-wanted to keep planting on our ground some also). Well, he started buying it CFD and though it's not paid for the owner has passed away, her children probably wouldn't care. He had someone spray it last year, though boundaries clearly marked came over on our side. Most disturbing is the run off killed our sunflower (animal food) and all our fruit trees and brambles are there. This is affecting approx. 2 acres of our 4.58 acres.

    We can't currently leave this area biggest reasons is health problems/ dhs insurance and extremely high land prices.

    I'm ready to rent a backhoe and dig a culvert but that doesnt seem like enough protection. Suggestion would be appreciated.

    Thank you,

    Kelli
     
  2. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I was going to suggest you dig a diversion ditch along the property line between you and the sprayed field. Of course, it would need somewhere to drain into, but would also serve as a more visible property line to stop them from spraying onto your property.
     

  3. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    That is kind of an unusual situation? Let me explain myself first. I'm a small scale farmer in MN. I remember when we didn't own a sprayer, and didn't fertilize either. I can understand that lifestyle.

    Now I fertlize & spray for weeds. There are times in soybeans these days you either spray for bugs (and now rust) or you lose the crop, period. Nothing else works. Anyhow, fertilizer & spray costs money, so you apply it at low a rate as you can to get the job done. New govt farm programs (Conservation Security Program) are promoting methods that reduce fert & spray - even demand it to get payments.

    So, I am familiar with several sides of this kind of an issue.

    When I spray for weeds, I can pinpoint to within 10 inches of where I spray & where I don't. Been doing that for over 10 years now, I have many small 10-20 acre fields that boarder each other and hilly ground. If my spray would 'run off' I would kill many of my own crops. Corn, soybeans, alfalfa, oats. What I spray on one would kill the other, some are extremely sensitive....

    Most sprays these days are very short-term - they break down rapidly & do not stay in the soil very long. I put on a 1/2 gallon or less (some chemicals as low as 1/2 oz) per acre, with 15-20 gallons of water per acre.

    So, I'm curious about the particulars of your problem. Was there a very unusual heavy rainfall right at the time of spraying? What the wind very strong? What was the crop, and do you know what they were spraying for?

    I'm not trying to disagree with you, or anything. It just would be very, very unlikely for spray to wash along the ground & hurt your crops - unless something very unusual happened.

    Some certain sprays like to 'drift'. This happens with the wrong weather - temperature inversion, very windy or much worse is no wind at all; and also if the sprayer is set up wrong with tips that create very very tiny droplets and too much sprayer pressure. Do you know of any of these conditions? The person/ owner can be held responsible of operating their equipment outside the rules stated on the label of the pesticide. We need to take training courses for this. As a farmer, I don't like to see problems like this happening.

    Many times it is not the neighbor spraying that causes the problem. Run-off fom a highway, spray drift from 3 miles away (those temperature inversions with near zero wind are bad deals) or other surprising sources of problems are the true cause. As a farmer who attends the meetings, takes the courses, and reads the materials, it is interesting to watch all the investigations into these types of 'accusations' and what the real offender turns out to be.

    Could you supply any more info of what _is_ happening? I just can't see a trench helping you on this, that is not really how herbicides cause problems - very often.

    --->Paul
     
  4. Kelli

    Kelli Active Member

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    Location:
    Illinois
    Paul,

    It was soybeans. We are uphill from the road and the only other field is across the street is bottom land. Someone else farms it but it's surrounded by trees and way below us. We live on a Right triangle shaped property , most uphill with the long tip heading down. I do remember it was really windy, could have rained (sorry don't remember) but it was unseasonably warm and our sunflowers were coming up. Next day DH noticed them all dead, he knew it was the spray. Oh, they were not near the road but near the field. His family farmed for years as did my grandparents. This is not a vendeta against farmers, believe me.

    MY children are adopted and have fragile health. We are both concerned. He's more passive 'let it lie' ( don't use land), I am more when there's a problem let's fix it kind of person. Besides I purchased the land and want to use it :) Plus there are 10 fruit tree that can't be moved now.

    Again, I have nothing against farmers. I am just suprised that he is now spraying; a problem now exists and I want to rectify it.

    Kelli
     
  5. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Thanks for the explination.

    Most soybeans (something like 80%) grown in the USA are Round-Up Ready. They are sprayed with Roundup.

    Roundup will not kill _anything_ green by running off the ground and soaking into the ground. It is a contact spray that kills plants by being absorbed into a green & growing leaf. It also does not harm any green plants shortly after it is sprayed, as it breaks down into non-leathal components in an hour or 2.

    Digging a trench will not prevent whatever happened to you if, indeed, it was typical soybean spray that caused it.

    Now, you might want to keep the Roundup from washing ont your property, etc. But, your plants would not have been killed by Roundup washing along the ground.

    I guess that was my only angle on this. Just trying to figure out the problem. Unless there are not RR soybeans. Even then, it is just very, very rare for sprays to reloacte themselves & cause damage by rainwater moving them.

    The moat might give you piece of mind, but that might be all. Very little chance it would have changed the outcome on your sunflowers - which are very similar to soybeans, and likely would survive most regular (non-rup) sprays.

    I'm not giving you any helpful answers, but maybe you need to be looking at the problem differently? Herbicides don't often work the way you are trying to go about this.

    --->Paul