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What's to love? Really. Someone help me understand.
As someone who's been using a dishwasher for decades, and on a septic system...

When you're finished eating, you scrape the dishes into the trash can. No need to rinse. Put them right into the dishwasher.

A box of Cascade dishwasher pods (it's just liquid dish soap) will last me about 4 months and costs less than $20. Don't use Tide pods in your dishwasher! Those are for your laundry.

Never had a problem with "lime" forming on dishes. But then, we don't have any lime in our well water. It dries everything just fine, as long as you loaded it correctly.

The last thing I want to do after a long day that just ended with meal prep and eating is to stand in front of the sink, killing my back, while hand-scrubbing a bunch of dishes. Screw that. Just load it all in the dishwasher as you go through the day. In the late evening, you prep the coffee pot for the next morning and hit Start on the dishwasher. Go to bed. In the morning, all of the dishes are clean and ready to be placed in the cabinets while your coffee is brewing. Between loading and unloading, I doubt there is more than 5-10 minutes of labor invested in the dishwasher. Doing all that by hand is going to kill several times more than that, plus you'll have to clutter up a big chunk of counter space with a drying rack. No thanks.

~~~

To the OP, there's nothing about a dishwasher or a washing machine (laundry) that's going to mess up a properly installed septic system with a proper leach field. I even have an in-sink disposal (it's NOT for "garbage", just for small quantity, incidental food waste from meal prep). I have my tank pumped every 3rd year (septic pumping company recommends every other year for residential). I installed the tank and leech field myself. The leach field is good for a half-century with 80 feet worth of Infiltrator Chambers in two parallel runs. The top of my tank is nearly 5 feet down and the leach field is over 6 feet down. There's no significant biological action down there with the ground temperature constantly below 40°F, so a little soap does nothing to the system.

YMMV.
 

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I put two dishwashers in this house and don't regret it at all. Those of you without by choice:

-Do you cook much?
-Do you have kids in the house?
 
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@JOAT in Minnesota, as well as in many states, the bottom of the drainfield trench cannot be deeper than 4-feet below the soil surface. Why, you may ask? Because, there is not enough air exchange in soil that deep for proper functioning of the trench bacteria. Air (oxygen) is necessary for the aerobic or facultative bacteria living at the soil interface within the trench. With inadequate air supply. the only bacteria that will survive are anaerobic bacteria. Anaerobic bacteria living within the trench can cause the biomat to become excessively thick which, in time, may result in sealing the trench and/or reducing the longevity of the septic system.
 

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@JOAT in Minnesota, as well as in many states, the bottom of the drainfield trench cannot be deeper than 4-feet below the soil surface. Why, you may ask? Because, there is not enough air exchange in soil that deep for proper functioning of the trench bacteria. Air (oxygen) is necessary for the aerobic or facultative bacteria living at the soil interface within the trench. With inadequate air supply. the only bacteria that will survive are anaerobic bacteria. Anaerobic bacteria living within the trench can cause the biomat to become excessively thick which, in time, may result in sealing the trench and/or reducing the longevity of the septic system.
In my state, you're not allowed to have the leach field less than 4 feet deep. Because it will freeze. And then backup into your tank and house. The tank and leach field all have to be at a depth greater than 4 feet, or else you have to lay down foam insulation over the top at a thickness sufficient to prevent the soil under the insulation from freezing at whatever depth it is installed. Even though the top of my tank is nearly 5 feet down, I still put 1-1/2" foam board over the top of the tank and I ran 2" board over the top of all of my lines. The last thing you ever want to deal with is a frozen septic system in the dead of winter.

There should be no soil under your leach field. It's supposed to be dug deep enough to get to the permeable sand/gravel material under your soil and clay layers. In my area, top soil ends about 6 inches down and the clay layers end between 3-4 feet down. After that, it's sand and gravel all the way to bedrock. When I installed my system, I was required to dig a test hole to the depth of where I wanted to put the leachfield and fill a 5-gallon bucket with that material, then take it to a local engineering lab for analysis and certification that the sand/gravel mixture was appropriate for drainage. They will not let you put a leach field over soil or clay.

There should not be any biological action happening in your leach field. The sole purpose of a leach field is for the separated water exiting the back of your septic tank to infiltrate back down into ground water through the aforementioned sand/gravel. After that water travels down through the sand/gravel, it will be filtered back into potable water and eventually end up back at your well.

Finally, atmospheric oxygen generally only penetrates about 4-5 INCHES into the top soil. Unless there's some natural, open penetration of the topsoil, you're not going to find enough oxygen at even 1-2 feet deep in northern climates to support a significant level of aerobic bacterial action without an atmospheric ventilation system.
 

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I put two dishwashers in this house and don't regret it at all. Those of you without by choice:

-Do you cook much?
-Do you have kids in the house?
I do cook a lot. Not bragging, but I am very efficient at it. I could have been a short order cook and loved it. I clean as I go with a sink. By the time I get done cooking, the only thing dirty is the pans the food is in. Even when I cook dumplings from scratch, all the flour is cleaned off the marble countertop I roll it out on. Never wanted a dishwasher because it would slow down my mojo.
 

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I do cook a lot. Not bragging, but I am very efficient at it. I could have been a short order cook and loved it. I clean as I go with a sink. By the time I get done cooking, the only thing dirty is the pans the food is in. Even when I cook dumplings from scratch, all the flour is cleaned off the marble countertop I roll it out on. Never wanted a dishwasher because it would slow down my mojo.
That’s how we do it, too. It all depends on what we’re having, who is doing most of the cooking. Whoever is doing most of the cooking is dodging whoever is doing most of the washing.

Then we eat. Those plates or bowls usually sit in the sink until the next day.
 

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@JOAT What state do you live in? I live in Minnesota and have researched and enforced septic system standards for almost 40 years. I find it hard to believe that any state has colder winter soil temperatures than Minnesota...unless, you live in northern Alaska.
 

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That’s how we do it, too. It all depends on what we’re having, who is doing most of the cooking. Whoever is doing most of the cooking is dodging whoever is doing most of the washing.

Then we eat. Those plates or bowls usually sit in the sink until the next day.
Neither the farm boss, nor the grumpy old man like waking up to a sink full of dirty dishes. It happens from time to time out of life's necessities. But, it is the exception, rather than the rule.
 

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Neither the farm boss, nor the grumpy old man like waking up to a sink full of dirty dishes. It happens from time to time out of life's necessities. But, it is the exception, rather than the rule.
It’s just the two of us, so those last dishes are literally two plates and two forks, or two bowls and two spoons.

On fancy dinner nights, it might be two plates, two bowls, and two spoons.
 

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It’s just the two of us, so those last dishes are literally two plates and two forks, or two bowls and two spoons.

On fancy dinner nights, it might be two plates, two bowls, and two spoons.
I understand. Around here, chaos is a constant companion probably due to poor supervision.
 

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I put two dishwashers in this house and don't regret it at all. Those of you without by choice:

-Do you cook much?
-Do you have kids in the house?
Yes and yes. I used to cook all the time when the kids were little. I had dishwashers in the apartments where we lived but they didn't clean dirty dishes so I used them to hold clean dishes after hand washing.
 

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"Southern" Alaska.
I'll be the first to admit that I know very little of the Alaskan deep trench septic systems. We live in northern Minnesota. We had friends that live in Bethel, AK. We compare outdoor temperatures all the time. What is odd, to me at least, is their temp during the Alaskan winter is almost always warmer than our temp in Minnesota. With that said, Minnesota septic rules require only 6 inches of soil cover over an insulated (R value =10) septic tank. Our gravity septic system, which is composed of a septic tank and drainfield chambers (not rock), is only complies with the minimum standard of 6" of soil cover over the tank and 12" of soil cover over the chambers. In our 20 years of living here, we have never had a freezing issue.
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There should not be any biological action happening in your leach field.
Well, biological activity is happening in all leach fields, whether you want it there or not. For that matter, biological activity occurs in cold, pristine groundwater aquifers, too. Google the phrase, "septic biomat."
 

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Listen to Cabin Fever! In this he knows!

BTW: I have a septic and a dishwasher - the dishwasher is used as a dish drainer and dryer :ROFLMAO:

And be aware - many places will not allow separate grey water systems.....
 

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Well, biological activity is happening in all leach fields, whether you want it there or not. For that matter, biological activity occurs in cold, pristine groundwater aquifers, too. Google the phrase, "septic biomat."
I should have said "significant biological activity". The thing about the ground up here is the concept of permafrost. There are large areas of the state where the ground never thaws out. It's not that bad where I live, but winter typically comes to an end in April. It's mid-May before the snow has melted back to reveal dirt (mud at this point). And if you dig a hole in June, you'll hit ice around 1-2 feet down. The freeze depth is usually between 2-4 feet and that all depends on what's on the top 6-inches of ground. If the ground has been cleared and it's covered with gravel or grass, it's going to be frozen deeper. If it's natural vegetation with moss and brush, it doesn't freeze as deep, however it doesn't thaw as quickly either. I've pulled tree stumps in late June where the soil immediately under the stump was still frozen solid (and our roots run shallow, between 1-2 feet deep).

At any rate, Alaska DEC requires (and "requires" is used loosely as there isn't any state laws mandating certain types of septic systems outside of municipal areas; they actually just "request" that people do it right) that your leach field is either buried below frostline (4 feet) or it has insulation installed over it to prevent freezing. You are also required (requested) to use a 2ft wide drainage trench with undisturbed sand/gravel in the bottom (no clay) and the trench has to be backfilled with sewer rock (2-inch round rock) that is topped with a sheet of Typar fabric before backfilling the top of the trench with gravel. If you have to put down insulation (1-inch thick foam board for every foot less than 4 feet deep), then that has to be installed right on top of the Typar fabric. And naturally, you're going to have your drain tile (perf pipe) in the middle of the sewer rock section.

When I did my system, I used Infiltrator chambers instead of perf pipe. So, I have a 2ft wide, open-bottom, half pipe "culvert" running in the bottom of my trench. The water entering this system from the tank is simply dumping into one end of this chamber and flowing over the ground under it. No little holes through the side of a pipe to get plugged up with bio-mat. Over the years, it is expected that a mat layer will form at the beginning of the chambers (I have 2 parallel runs, so the tank is simultaneously dumping into the start of both of them). As that happens, the water just runs a little further down to find fresh ground to soak into. The exposed square footage of ground that is available for absorption is exponentially more than a run of perf pipe.
 

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I should have said "significant biological activity". The thing about the ground up here is the concept of permafrost. There are large areas of the state where the ground never thaws out. It's not that bad where I live, but winter typically comes to an end in April. It's mid-May before the snow has melted back to reveal dirt (mud at this point). And if you dig a hole in June, you'll hit ice around 1-2 feet down. The freeze depth is usually between 2-4 feet and that all depends on what's on the top 6-inches of ground. If the ground has been cleared and it's covered with gravel or grass, it's going to be frozen deeper. If it's natural vegetation with moss and brush, it doesn't freeze as deep, however it doesn't thaw as quickly either. I've pulled tree stumps in late June where the soil immediately under the stump was still frozen solid (and our roots run shallow, between 1-2 feet deep).

At any rate, Alaska DEC requires (and "requires" is used loosely as there isn't any state laws mandating certain types of septic systems outside of municipal areas; they actually just "request" that people do it right) that your leach field is either buried below frostline (4 feet) or it has insulation installed over it to prevent freezing. You are also required (requested) to use a 2ft wide drainage trench with undisturbed sand/gravel in the bottom (no clay) and the trench has to be backfilled with sewer rock (2-inch round rock) that is topped with a sheet of Typar fabric before backfilling the top of the trench with gravel. If you have to put down insulation (1-inch thick foam board for every foot less than 4 feet deep), then that has to be installed right on top of the Typar fabric. And naturally, you're going to have your drain tile (perf pipe) in the middle of the sewer rock section.

When I did my system, I used Infiltrator chambers instead of perf pipe. So, I have a 2ft wide, open-bottom, half pipe "culvert" running in the bottom of my trench. The water entering this system from the tank is simply dumping into one end of this chamber and flowing over the ground under it. No little holes through the side of a pipe to get plugged up with bio-mat. Over the years, it is expected that a mat layer will form at the beginning of the chambers (I have 2 parallel runs, so the tank is simultaneously dumping into the start of both of them). As that happens, the water just runs a little further down to find fresh ground to soak into. The exposed square footage of ground that is available for absorption is exponentially more than a run of perf pipe.
Thanks for the info. Our home system also uses Infiltrator-brand chambers. Our chambers have some slots on the sides above the bottom edge. You're right about how a biomat moves down the soil interface as the leachfield is used over time.

One thing you might find interesting. When I was student at the UofM, I took an onsite wastewater treatment course. The engineering professor who was teaching the class told us how silly it was for the State to require that perforated pipe be used down the entire length of the drainfield trench. He did a little study where he filled a 50-gallon barrel on his aboveground porch. On the ground he placed a piece of perfectly level perforated sewer pipe, with holes aligned at 5 and 7 o'clock. A length of 2" poly pipe connected the barrel to the pipe. He opened the valve on the barrel and let the water rip down the poly pipe into the sewer pipe. Guess what? All of the water drained out of the first few holes in the sewer pipe. He concluded that most of the sewer pipe in a drainfield trench never sees wastewater during its entire life. All that is necessary is a foot or two of perforated pipe at the inlet of a drainfield trench. If the trench bottom is level, as it is supposed to be, the wastewater will flow down the trench based on loading rate, soil permeability and biomat thickness.
 

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That all makes perfect sense. It's been a decade since I installed my system, which was a replacement for an improperly installed field done by the original builder of my house about 15 years prior. When we did my new field, we put something like a 1 inch per 10 ft slope to the drain field, if I remember correctly. Not much, but enough to ensure that water wouldn't pool at the beginning of the trench as a mat develops.

An unfortunate thing about living outside of any kind of building regulations is that a private builder (which is who built my house) can install their own system with no inspections or checks by any agency. The DEC puts out a standard, but that standard is not enforced outside of municipal areas. So, I bought a 10-year old house and then started having septic issues about 5 years later. Discovered that the septic tank they installed was this weird plastic tank and it was assembled incorrectly when it was put in. So, we couldn't get the front half of the tank pumped out because they couldn't get a hose into the front of the tank. When they pumped it from the back, we had massive backflow from the leach field. That started the process of rebuilding. I took a class from the local DEC office on doing a homeowner install and followed all their guidelines on the installation. Bought a new tank and all the Infiltrator stuff and then hired a friend of the family with an excavator who does a lot of septic installs as a private contractor. It was basically him running the heavy equipment and me doing everything else. On day one we pulled the old tank out of the ground and trenched out the line to the house and then installed a new line and the new tank with insulation over all of it. We had to make a side trench off the old leach field so it could drain massive amounts of standing water. While doing that, we discovered that instead of a trench with sewer rock, the original builder had simply dug out a 20x20 square, dumped in a foot of sewer rock, run 30ft of perf pipe on a diagonal across that, and then laid a piece of Visqueen plastic over the top before burying it all. The whole thing was only 3ft down. It was the worst leach field install my excavator guy had ever seen, and he's seen a lot over many years of doing this stuff.

On day two, we did the trenches, installed the Infiltrator leach field, and then buried everything. Two dudes and a complete system replacement in two days of work. I loved how easily all that Infiltrator stuff went together. Really neat system. In theory, one could even dig down to the end of the existing trenches to find the end caps and then extend the trenches further to add more leach field if the existing sections were to completely mat over and stop working. But I imagine that the tank will rot out and have to be replaced long before that would happen.
 

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Designing my kitchen at a project house I’m going to be renting out. This house has septic, a first for me. Wifey wants to put a dishwasher in the kitchen, I say no, because I don’t want the extra water going in the septic, though I suppose modern ones don’t use TOO much water as compared to the old ones.
So you members with septic, would you do a dishwasher or not?
BTW, I didn’t want to deal with dumping grey water separately in the plumbing.
I would NEVER put a dishwasher in a rental home unless it is going to be rented to extremely high-quality renters.
 

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Designing my kitchen at a project house I’m going to be renting out. This house has septic, a first for me. Wifey wants to put a dishwasher in the kitchen, I say no, because I don’t want the extra water going in the septic, though I suppose modern ones don’t use TOO much water as compared to the old ones.
So you members with septic, would you do a dishwasher or not?
BTW, I didn’t want to deal with dumping grey water separately in the plumbing.
We have had septics my entire life 59 years, never had issues, as long as your drain field works, new house you won't see issues for at least 20 years!
 

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I can't stand dishwashers. What a waste of money. Rinse the dishes, put the dishes in the dishwasher, wait until the dishwasher is filled, wash dishes, use various chemicals to keep lime from forming on dishes because of the way dishwasher dries dishes, dishwasher breaks, okay it works again, back to looking for your favorite glass only to find it sitting in the dishwasher waiting for the dishwasher to be full.....

Tide pod challenge.

What's to love? Really. Someone help me understand.
I can't stand cars and trucks. What a waist of money. Something is always broke, and very expensive to fix. Always needs more fuel, which costs more every day. Many people stay in debt their entire life, so they can have the newest model. And have two or three when one is all they really need. What's to love?

Answer to my own question. "We live in America, not Trashcanistan, and until the dimocrats complete the take over of the entire Nation, we can have what ever kind of car or appliance we can afford.
 
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