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All my life folks around here just ran some black pipe a out to a corner of the yard. But nowadays..rules

Here you can dig a trench and do it like a field line for a septic so you dont have to run it into your septic. I have my washer and all sinks going into it. Only thing going into septic is toilet stuff

It's that way here too. You just have to have over 11 acres.
 

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Adding extra appliances are just more things that break and you need to repair. I use to have dishwasher washer dryer s in my rentals but removed when i moved further away as to have to call repair man. People just dont care about taking care of nice things like they did. And the cost now is just prohibited
 

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A couple points--

Water softeners exchange ions in the water-- water with calcium (hard water) in--> water with Na out...so little involved that the water doesn't taste salty....too little to make a difference in a septic system. You can "salt a field" with Ca just as well as with Na-- youi need tons of either to kill bacteria.

If you'd ever taken apart a dishwasher and saw how small and flimsy the evacuation pump is, you'd never put anything but clean dishes in a dish washer.

Dishwashers made since 2013 only use ~4 gal of water; Energy Star units, even less. Probably less than washing by hand.

Grease down any drain probably doesn't even make it all the way out to your septic system, but coats & clogs the pipes along the way.....That's another nice thing about living on acrerage--just take spent cooking oil & grease and toss it out in the field. The soil microbes love it, although I do notice an increased risk of heart attack among my local nematodes.
 

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All my life folks around here just ran some black pipe a out to a corner of the yard. But nowadays..rules

Here you can dig a trench and do it like a field line for a septic so you dont have to run it into your septic. I have my washer and all sinks going into it. Only thing going into septic is toilet stuff
A pipe bypassing the septic that drains only grey water is common around us too. Some pipes just open up into a field or ditch. No rules that I am aware of.
 

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BTW, I didn’t want to deal with dumping grey water separately in the plumbing.
Just for reference, even though you don't want to hassle with it, this is a set up I considered at one time.
The guy plumbed this for all of his grey water. The first barrel is a settling tank with a pull out washable filter. The second tank is his leech tank.
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We wash dishes by hand. Supposedly, dishwashers use less water compared to hand washing. However, when we visit people who have automatic dishwashers, they always use tons of water rinsing the dishes before putting them into the dishwater. Based on this experience, I am going to say B.S. to the claim that using automatic dishwashers save on water. YMMV

Regarding garbage disposals, the State of Minnesota requires that the septic tank be compartmentalized and it's size increase by 50% at homes using a garbage disposal.

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We wash dishes by hand. Supposedly, dishwashers use less water compared to hand washing. However, when we visit people who have automatic dishwashers, they always use tons of water rinsing the dishes before putting them into the dishwater. Based on this experience, I am going to say B.S. to the claim that using automatic dishwashers save on water. YMMV
My mother in law starts her dishwasher up and it runs for at least 2 hours.
 

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A couple points--

Water softeners exchange ions in the water-- water with calcium (hard water) in--> water with Na out...so little involved that the water doesn't taste salty....too little to make a difference in a septic system. You can "salt a field" with Ca just as well as with Na-- youi need tons of either to kill bacteria.
The issue isn’t the water coming through the water softener in-service. The water running through the media tank, as ends up in your sinks and showers, has a negligible amount of salt in it, like you say.

However, at 02:30, or whenever your system is set to regenerate, the extremely salty water in your brine tank gets pumped through the media tank to oxidize the solids caught in the media to break it loose and flush it out. Then, several gallons of fresh water are pumped through the media to flush out the residual salt from the regeneration. That water contains a lot of salt and shouldn’t be pumped into your septic tank if it can be avoided.

Even if a single regen isn’t enough to crash your tank’s biome, if you go on vacation and don’t turn off your softener, you can end up pumping a hundred gallons or more of salt water into your septic tank with no fresh water coming in. Sure, the first Amber Heard you drop in the tank, when you get home, is going to start to replenish the biome, but there’s no good reason to stress it in the first place.


That’s why most media/salt-based water softeners are pumped out into the yard via a separate gray-water line. A lot of systems that were installed pre-90s, and ones where the homeowner installs it themself and doesn’t know better, use the easier/cheaper path and direct that discharge into the plumbing drain. New and professionally installed systems almost always (always?) pump the discharge outside separately.
 

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Dishwasher on septic, no problem. Skip the powdered detergent though, as they can make you need to pump more often. Get a sludge of them on top of everything that slowly hardens.

Our house here has the washer and dishwasher on separate gray water systems. Works fine for us.

Modern dishwashers do run around 2 hours, since they took the phosphates out of the dish detergent. As to saving water, it depends. If you don't have giant sinks, or use dishpans, you can actually save water doing them by hand. And then you can use a bucket to carry the rinse water out to your plants.

Problem for me is bad disks in the neck, so I usually use the dishwasher. Good dw detergent is expensive though, so I always run really full loads. I wash pots and pans by hand so I don't need to run the dw more than once every day or two. And I never prerinse.
 

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The reason water softener discharge is recommended to not flow into the septic system has really nothing to do with the septic tank bacteria. The purpose of a septic tank is to allow for the settling of solids, not for the digestion of solids. In northern climates, there is very little biologic activity in septic tanks be cause of the ground temperature being too cold.

Water softener discharge, being high in sodium, can actually cause the soil in the drainfield to plug, especially in fine-textured soils. The sodium ion can cause the destruction of structure (tilth or granularity) which is so important for water movement in fine-textured soil. In other words, without strong soil structure, effluent can not flow out of the drainfield, and therefore could cause a backup of sewage in the home.
 

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We wash dishes by hand. Supposedly, dishwashers use less water compared to hand washing. However, when we visit people who have automatic dishwashers, they always use tons of water rinsing the dishes before putting them into the dishwater. Based on this experience, I am going to say B.S. to the claim that using automatic dishwashers save on water. YMMV

Regarding garbage disposals, the State of Minnesota requires that the septic tank be compartmentalized and it's size increase by 50% at homes using a garbage disposal.

View attachment 113016
That's one of the reasons I don't have one. Took mine out and built cabinets in it's place because to me, it was a waste of space.

I just can't see me rinsing them just to put them into the dishwasher. Plus, when I cook, I clean as I go and there is not much mess at all.
 

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The reason water softener discharge is recommended to not flow into the septic system has really nothing to do with the septic tank bacteria. The purpose of a septic tank is to allow for the settling of solids, not for the digestion of solids. In northern climates, there is very little biologic activity in septic tanks be cause of the ground temperature being too cold.

Water softener discharge, being high in sodium, can actually cause the soil in the drainfield to plug, especially in fine-textured soils. The sodium ion can cause the destruction of structure (tilth or granularity) which is so important for water movement in fine-textured soil. In other words, without strong soil structure, effluent can not flow out of the drainfield, and therefore could cause a backup of sewage in the home.
I didn’t think of the issue with the extra mineral build up in the tank, filter and drain field, but that sounds valid.

You still have plenty of biological activity in your northern septic tank, though. That bacteria only needs to be something like 45F, and the water you have flowing into your tank and the ground insulation keep it well above that. I suppose, if you didn’t put any house water into it for a while, you could get cold enough to kill off the bacteria, but you’re getting awfully close to freezing at that point and probably have worse problems ahead than just needing to recharge your bacteria.
 

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Let's think about the benefits of bacterial action in a septic tank. The worst thing that could ever happen to a septic system is if bacterial action digested 100% of organic matter in the tank. Now, some people might think this would be a great benefit. "I never have to pump my septic tank! All the organic matter is consumed by bacteria and disappears."

In reality, the more that the organic matter is digested, the more soluble nutrients and bacteria are discharged to the drainfield. "What's the problem with that?" The problem is the nutrient-rich and bacteria-rich effluent will cause a slime to grow on the walls and floors of the drainfield trenches and beds. This slime, called a "biomat" grows in every drainfield. However, when the drainfield is overloaded with extra nutrients, the biomat becomes excessively thick and can seal the drainfield.

So, again, my point is, bacterial digestion of solids in septic tanks, even tho it happens, is not necessarily a positive. The primary purpose of a septic tank is for the settling of solids and not the digestion of organic material. We want to get rid of wastewater nutrients via the pumping of the organic matter our of the septic tank, and not by letting the nutrients flow into the drainfield where the nutrients could cause the excessive growth of a biomat that seals the infiltration capability of the drainfield.
 

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We have had a dishwasher, and a disposal for the past 25 years at our place in Arizona. During that time the tank has been pumped out once. It didn't really need it, I just wanted to see how near full it was after twelve years of use. The grass is always taller over the drain field. The goats love it.
 

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We have had a dishwasher, and a disposal for the past 25 years at our place in Arizona. During that time the tank has been pumped out once. It didn't really need it, I just wanted to see how near full it was after twelve years of use. The grass is always taller over the drain field. The goats love it.
I bought this house in January of 2018 and forgot where the septic cleanout was and found a perfectly round green spot during this summer's drought at about where I thought it was. My assumption is that with all the heat condensation made that area damp. I marked that sucker!
 

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I can't stand dishwashers. What a waste of money. Rinse the dishes, put the dishes in the dishwasher, wait until the dishwasher is filled, wash dishes, use various chemicals to keep lime from forming on dishes because of the way dishwasher dries dishes, dishwasher breaks, okay it works again, back to looking for your favorite glass only to find it sitting in the dishwasher waiting for the dishwasher to be full.....

Tide pod challenge.

What's to love? Really. Someone help me understand.
 
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