Dirt floor?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Simpler1773, Aug 5, 2006.

  1. Simpler1773

    Simpler1773 Well-Known Member

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    We are getting a building put up for our new goats and I am wondering if you can have a dirt floor (with plenty of straw of course) or does it need to be cement?

    Sorry if this is a silly question :)
    Ricki
     
  2. Dirt is the best to me. Cement will absorb all the urine and youll never get it clean again. A dirt floor can be dug out as needed. If you put down layers of lime and straw it will help control odors and will be much easier to keep clean. I had some lambing pens on a concrete floor last year and I swore Id never do that again because it took months to get the odor out even with the lime. If its new construction you may want to consider making the doors large enough to get a small front end loader inside to do the clean up. It just depends on how big youre planning to make it
     

  3. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Dirt is MUCH better than concrete!!
     
  4. homebirtha

    homebirtha Well-Known Member

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    We had dirt for awhile, but didn't really like it. It would get mucky and was hard to get it dry, especially in the hot, humid summers here. We put a wood floor down on top (made out of old fence boards we got for free). And I really like it. We sweep it out every morning and it's easy to keep clean. I'm sure it won't last forever, but it's a small barn. Dirt would be my second choice though, at least for the area the goats are in. Concrete for the milking and storage area though.
     
  5. Simpler1773

    Simpler1773 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks everyone, very helpful info ~ I'm sure I'll be back with more questions :)

    Ricki
     
  6. valhalladad

    valhalladad Active Member

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    I always had dirt. This is also recommending in ever goat book I have seem. With bedding, either hay, straw or chips you don't have problems. Cement is very hard on goat feet and causes problems. I had a good wood floor in my milking section so it could be kept clean. The dirt absorbs the moister and bedding keeps the goats dry. It worked for me for 18 years.
     
  7. fishhead

    fishhead Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Has anyone built a floor with a built-in drainage system to keep it dry?

    It looks like a person could bury drain tile in a bed of sand so that any moisture would seep down and collect into the drain tile. With enough elevation it would drain outside by gravity.

    The hatchery where I bought pheasant chicks used no bedding just a thick layer of sand. Droppings were just raked daily. The permeable sand kept the floor dry even around the waterer.
     
  8. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Dirt is wonderful foor the floor of loafing shed or winter shelter. One thing to remember and that is to keep the dirt floor of your barns, higher than the surrounding area so that moisture doesn't collect on the floor of your barn. Most of it will stay drained and mostly dry this way. Of course some of the success of this depends on the type of soil you have. You can also use sand or gravel between the dirt floor and the bedding if you have a moisture problem. This allows the urine to drain away and dry. I have used concrete in the past and hated it! Now concrete in the milk barn....yeah, I'm all for it!
     
  9. farmgirl85

    farmgirl85 Member

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    I use dirt/with cruched stone every where except the milk room which is concrete. I put a 4" layer of crushed limestone down in all dirt stalls. I then have kept straw as a bedding. When I clean out the barn in the spring and have it down to the crushed stone I use my Mantis tiller to stir it up. I lime it then and turn on the exhaust fans. It completely dries up in a couple of days. I place new bedding down and I am good for another year. I continue to add new straw as needed. I rotate the herd around as having multiple stalls helps. The crushed limestone absorbs most of the odor and moisture. I have been really happy with it. It has lasted 4 years and I may add some to it next year as you loose a little everytime you clean out. Good Luck!!!
     
  10. AllWolf

    AllWolf We love all our animals

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    I have a dirt floor for all my goats and love it. Lot better than a wood floor or other types.

    Good Luck on your goats.