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A neighbor told my boys that he recommends dipping dogs in a mix of Kerosene and water "every now and then" to keep away various ailments. Our dogs are being treated for yeast on their paws (due probably to their love of digging in the creek to get to muskrats and turtles) and he kindly offered his Kerosene suggestion (after he learned our dogs had been to the Vet at quite a cost). He suggested dipping their paws in straight Kerosene. He told the boys that in the "old days" Kerosene was used to treat many troubles and works quite well.

Now we totally are not going to dip any living animal (dog or otherwise) into Kerosene, however we are curious as to what in Kerosene would work and does anyone today still use the kerosene Treatment?

( This Discussion is not part of the School Discussion Class, however, responses will be shared with the School Animal Owning members. )

Thank you in advance for responses, ideas and suggestions.
 

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I've heard stories kerosene was used to treat a number of ailments from head lice to hemorrhoids :flame: and remedy's for animals as well. I don't know if they work and I don't know for sure if kerosene today is the same as it was back then...coal oil as it was called.
I did use it a time or two to prevent thrush on my horse's hoofs, though I doubt I would use it for anything but a heater or lantern today.
 

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I've never heard to use kerosene, but have had people suggest using used motor oil for mange. I used olive oil,and it worked just fine.

Now, a semi related story that goes off topic, lol. When we first got our dog he killed one of our chickens. We resolved the problem easily, but when we told a neighbor about it he suggested putting both the dog, and dead chicken into a barrel and rolling it down hill. I kid you not, that is what he suggested. Now, when we moved this other neighbor mentioned the used motor oil...so now dh and I have a joke that when ever something goes wrong, whoever is at fault will be covered in motor oil, put in a barrel, and rolled down a hill :p It is our catch all solution for just about everything, lol.
 

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I have heard that kerosene can be used for a variety of ailments on animals and humans. I am sure you could google it and come up with info..... Can't get past the smell myself -
 

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When my mother was a girl there was another girl in this area who got a really bad case of poison ivy. It was accepted at the time to use a "drying agent" of some kind on this to treat it, and that was quite often gasoline. The father coated the girl all in gasoline and she ended up dying. It was never considered anything but an accident, whereas today he'd be in jail for a few years.

No, I wouldn't dip the dogs in kerosene, either. Might give Blue-Kote a whirl on the paws.

Jennifer
 

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Peroxide does the trick without poisoning. It also used to be common practice to sprinkle oil on the driveway to keep the dust down. Imagine what THAT did to the groundwater :rolleyes:
 

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Wind in Her Hair said:
kerosene is a petroleum distillate.
Most of the non-aromatic distillates are RELATIVELY harmless to human heath, that is unless they are burning.

I've actually swallowed a mouthful of diesel (very similar to kerosene) and while absolutely disgusting it didn't do me any harm. I don't recommend trying it, but it didn't harm me any. Needless to say I've sworn off ever siphoning diesel that way again.

I use kerosene (or something similar) to remove tar (used for waterproofing basements) from my arms fairly regularly. I have no idea if dipping the dogs paws in it would help him, but it certainly won't harm him, provided no one lights him on fire.

Pete
 

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It was recommended I use it on a hens legs with scaly mite disease. The amount of discomfort inflicted on that bird, there is always a better option than kerosene.
 

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Way back in the 1840's with the start of the oil industry, oil products were sold as "universal" cures for everything. It replaced the old turpentine cures. Think of it as the colloidial silver and St John's Wort of the 19th century.
As for the dogs feet, try Fungisal, it works real well on my goats.
 

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When I was growing up we always put kerosene on any cuts we got working on the farm. All I know is Im still around and it felt much better than methiolate or alcohol. :)
 

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I dipped a cat in kerosene in Indonesia because of lice and fleas. No other remedies were available due to our remote location. It survived. The lice and fleas didn't. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thank you everyone. I am NOT going to dip anyone in the Kerosene. The dogs like to sleep under my work desk - so no kerosene! We are using what the Vet gave us. The boys just wondered what was in the Kerosene that would make it work - if indeed it did work. Thanks.
 

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Ma used kerosene to get rid of lice and nits in my brothers hair. It worked real well. I also use kerosene and sometimes gasoline to get the oil and grease off of my hands. Too many people equate kerosene to gasoline. Kerosene is much less volatile and therefore is less likely to be absorbed by the body than is something like gasoline. Kerosene is simply a thin mineral oil.
 

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My cousin picked up a small snake once and it bit him. Wasn't a telephone then or no way to get him to a dr so Grandma stuck his hand in kerosene and he just got a bit sick. Hand swelled a bit, but he survived. The snake looked like a small copperhead.

They used to use kerosene for about everything. They would make a poultice of kerosene and lard and put it on your chest for a cold or pneumonia.
 

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Nel frattempo said:
Thank you everyone. I am NOT going to dip anyone in the Kerosene. The dogs like to sleep under my work desk - so no kerosene! We are using what the Vet gave us. The boys just wondered what was in the Kerosene that would make it work - if indeed it did work. Thanks.
What makes kerosene work, is the oil base. The oil suffocates the mites, lice, fleas, ticks, etc. Any oil will work. Mineral or baby oil, even vegetable oil will do the trick and will be much safer.
 
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If you wanna practice dipping someone in kerosene, I'm sure my MIL is around here somewhere......might be the only way we have to get that Marloboro out of her mouth..... :flame:
 
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PineRidge said:
Now, when we moved this other neighbor mentioned the used motor oil...so now dh and I have a joke that when ever something goes wrong, whoever is at fault will be covered in motor oil, put in a barrel, and rolled down a hill :p It is our catch all solution for just about everything, lol.
lol, that's cute
 

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Kerosene has been used for a "medical" treatment pre 1950's (antibiotics) basically, or light oils, as a cure all any thing from a wormer to fleas and tick control, greases were used for wounds and the such, many used it for lice for people.

Internal use of kerosene has been considered hazardous to your health,

at one time it was coal oil that was used as lamp oils (i don't know if that makes a difference)

short story on coal oil, as a cure http://www.texasescapes.com/DelbertTrew/Coal-Oil-Home-Remedy.htm

Coal oil was
useful all-purpose home remedy
by Delbert Trew



Recently, while browsing through a stack of books at a garage sale, I found a modern day medical encyclopedia. Priced at $1, the book was a bargain, so I took it home to read.

I was amazed at the number of diseases and maladies listed I had never heard of before.

I was equally amazed at the remedies and cures offered and thought how useful the information would have been during my childhood. Everyone was poor, had little money for medicines or doctors and used home remedies on all but serious illnesses.


For headache, lie down with a cold washrag on your forehead. For binding intestinal problems, mineral oil or castor oil usually provided relief. For internal problems of the opposite nature, take a few spoons full of flour paste.

For croup, coughs, or pneumonia you were treated with Vicks, Mentholatum or camphor. If the problems persisted, add a dash of coal oil to the cough syrup and another dash to the hot cloth being applied to your chest or throat. All surface wounds of any type were soaked in coal oil daily to prevent infection.


My big toe, wounded over 50 years ago by a wayward post hole digger, rested in coal oil each day for weeks. Today, when I trim the toenail, I can still smell a hint of coal oil in the air.

Aunt Ida, who as a little girl in Oklahoma Territory, jumped off the porch onto a rusty nail in a piece of firewood and nearly lost a foot in the process. The doctor finally gave up and told her to go home and soak the wound in coal oil twice a day and pray for healing. The remedy worked.


As I suspected, a detailed search of the book did not show coal oil as a recommended remedy for any malady. I now believe use of the concoction was for purely psychological reasons. The taste and smell was so terrible no one complained again after being dosed.

The story is told of a Dust Bowl-era employee with a drinking problem. When he caught the whooping cough, Grandma Trew cured his cough and his drinking problem with a combination of whiskey, lemon and coal oil, warmed slightly. Again, psychology and the horrible taste might have had significant influence on the cure.

I recall one time after Grandma Trew treated me with a generous dose of coal oil and castor oil, Grandpa Trew mischievously whispered a warning not to pass gas while standing against a hot wood stove.
© Delbert Trew
"It's All Trew" April 1 , 2004 column

another interesting read of early folk medicines (this is jsut a short section),
http://thelibrary.springfield.missouri.org/lochist/periodicals/ozarkswatch/ow801c.htm
I found in our new Doctors Book of Home Remedies no reference to kerosene, or, as it was commonly referred to in earlier times, coal oil. Coal oil, however, was the treatment of choice for first aid emergencies in many an Ozarks household. A finger split by a too-long-held Fourth of July firecracker, a forearm snagged by a fishhook, a bare foot punctured by a nail, and most other bums, cuts, scrapes, and abrasions--even spider and snake bites--ail might have been treated by a liberal application of coal oil. This soothing liquid seemed to stop bleeding and prevent infection. Walker Powell said they used kerosene for snake bites. "After you got bit on your leg or your ankle, you'd just kick your foot down in a bucket o' kerosene. And we never did lose anybody from a copperhead bite."
I am sure it had some positive properties and would use if if there was nothing else to use, but I think today there are probably better things out there,

I know my parents sprayed the chicken houses with kerosene to control the mites from the chickens,
 
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