DiMeth 40% question

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Jcran, Sep 24, 2006.

  1. Jcran

    Jcran Well-Known Member

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    I remember someone telling me that I can use the Dimethoxy 40% solution orally for my kids to prevent coccidiosis. I live on the rainy north coast of California where cocci is endemic (80 degrees here today-absolute heat wave for us!). Does anyone out there use it and what is the oral dosage? I have two fullblood boer bucklings that are 3 weeks old today and I hoped to start using it...I bought the bottle but that's as far as I've gotten.
     
  2. susanne

    susanne Nubian dairy goat breeder

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    joan you can start di-methox today with your kids :) weight them and than give 1cc per ten pound today, following four days you give 1/2 cc per ten pound.
    mark your calendar and start treatment in 20 days. i would also worm with valbazen same dosage 1 cc per ten pound but only once.
     

  3. Jcran

    Jcran Well-Known Member

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    Thanks; I am still a little confused...treat today, then for four more days and THEN again in twenty days?
     
  4. SherrieC

    SherrieC Well-Known Member

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    yes the treatment is for five consecutive days, starting over again, and again every 20-21 days till they are around 7-8 months it is .08 - 1% of weight the first day, and days 2-5 .04 % - .05% it's easier to do the math for the 1 % and .05 % for instance if your kid weighs 20 lb. then day one 2cc's of dimethox, (and 2 cc's of valbazen wormer) day 2 1 cc of dimethox and no wormer, day 3 1 cc of dimethox repeat day 4 & 5

    for 30 lbs day on 3 cc's and the wormer ; ) day 2 -5 1.5 cc's dimethox
     
  5. Wendy

    Wendy Well-Known Member

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    I give 1/2 cc twice a day for a week & then 1/2 cc once a week until they are weaned. That is the preventive dosage. The dosage given above is what I use if they have a full blown case of cocci.
     
  6. SherrieC

    SherrieC Well-Known Member

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    no, and she is further south in California,

    the dose for full blown cocidiosis, is 1 % of body wieght for the full 5 days. not reducing to half.


    You need to break up the life cycle of the parasite, every 20-21 days before it hits the dangerous adult cycle that will injure the babies intestines,


    while Still retaining the critters in the babies bodie in imature non dangerous cycle so baby will develope immunities against them.

    Adult goats need to be immune as they carry these in their intestines.
     
  7. Wendy

    Wendy Well-Known Member

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    That is the preventive dose as stated in Hoegger's catalog & what I use. I have never had a problem with cocci following this preventive dosage.
     
  8. SherrieC

    SherrieC Well-Known Member

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    Yes, but many goat breeders in Indiana, Mich, Ohio, and Texas use this dosage, Its a much more wildly accepted dosage. Hoeggers are a supply cataloge, doesn't mean they know the dose's I disagree with a lot of their info, such as the herbal wormers, and the dimethox dose.

    She is not in a cold area like we are, I'm sure they don't have the winter kill like we do. They have much larger parasite burdens for much of the year. While our pens are frozen solid with no living worms and such.

    However I run my goats as a business, I expect them to thrive, milk reproduce, and grow well. You all run your own goats as you wish.
     
  9. susanne

    susanne Nubian dairy goat breeder

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    i'm not sure if we can say that hoeggers has the dosage wrong. i did that too but this does not make it right.
    first of di-methoxx is not labeld for goats. how do we know we are using the right dosage?
    i think the best advice would be to make a fecal check after treatment since coccidosis shows not always diarhea.

    this is the fact sheet for this drug. it definitive uses body weight for calculating the dosage.

    DI-METHOX® INJECTION-40%

    AgriLabs

    (SULFADIMETHOXINE INJECTION - 40%)

    ANTIBACTERIAL

    Each mL contains 400 mg sulfadimethoxine

    Cattle: For the treatment of bovine respiratory disease complex (shipping fever complex) and bacterial pneumonia associated with Pasteurella spp sensitive to sulfadimethoxine; necrotic pododermatitis (foot rot) and calf diphtheria caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum (Sphaerophorus necrophorus), sensitive to sulfadimethoxine.

    DESCRIPTION: DI-METHOX (Sulfadimethoxine Injection 40%) is a low-dosage, rapidly absorbed, long-acting sulfonamide, effective for the treatment of shipping fever complex, bacterial pneumonia, calf diphtheria and foot rot in cattle.

    Sulfadimethoxine is a white, almost tasteless and odorless compound. Chemically, it is N1-(2,6-dimethoxy-4-pyrimidinyl) sulfanilamide. The structural formula is:

    ACTIONS: Sulfadimethoxine has been demonstrated clinically or in the laboratory to be effective against a variety of organisms, such as streptococci, klebsiella, proteus, shigella, staphylococci, escherichia, and salmonella.1,2

    The systemic sulfonamides which include sulfadimethoxine are bacteriostatic agents. Sulfonamides competitively inhibit bacterial synthesis of folic acid (pteroylglutamic acid) from para-aminobenzoic acid. Mammalian cells are capable of utilizing folic acid in the presence of sulfonamides.

    The tissue distribution of sulfadimethoxine, as with all sulfonamides, is a function of plasma levels, degree of plasma protein binding, and subsequent passive distribution in the tissues of the lipid-soluble un-ionized form. The relative amounts are determined by both its pKa and by the pH of each tissue. Therefore, levels tend to be higher in less acid tissue and body fluids or those diseased tissues having high concentrations of leucocytes.2

    Slow renal excretion results from a high degree of tubular reabsorption,3 and plasma protein binding is very high, providing a blood reservoir of the drug. Thus, sulfadimethoxine maintains higher blood levels than most other long-acting sulfonamides. Single, comparatively low doses of Sulfadimethoxine Injection 40% give rapid and sustained therapeutic blood levels.1

    To assure successful sulfonamide therapy (1) the drug must be given early in the course of the disease, and it must produce a high sulfonamide level in the body rapidly after administration, (2) therapeutically effective sulfonamide levels must be maintained in the body throughout the treatment period, (3) treatment should continue for a short period of time after the clinical signs have disappeared, and (4) the causative organisms must be sensitive to this class of drugs.

    TOXICITY AND SAFETY: Data regarding acute (LD50) and chronic toxicities of sulfadimethoxine indicate the drug is safe. The LD50 in mice is greater than 2 g/kg body weight when administered intraperitoneally and greater than 16 g/kg when administered orally. In dogs receiving massive single oral doses of 3.2 g/kg body weight, diarrhea was the only adverse effect observed. Dogs given 160 mg/kg body weight orally daily for 13 weeks showed no signs of toxicity.

    In cattle sulfadimethoxine has been shown to be safe through extensive clinical use with other dosage forms. In addition, studies with intravenous administration of Sulfadimethoxine Injection 40% have demonstrated that hemolysis of erythrocytes does not occur by this route of administration. Sulfadimethoxine has a relatively high solubility at the pH normally occurring in the kidney, precluding the possibility of precipitation and crystalluria.

    INDICATIONS: DI-METHOX (Sulfadimethoxine Injection 40%) is indicated for the treatment of bovine respiratory disease complex (shipping fever complex) and bacterial pneumonia associated with Pasteurella spp. sensitive to sulfadimethoxine; neurotic pododermatis (foot rot) and calf diphtheria caused by Fusobacterium necrophorum (Sphaerophorus necrophorus), sensitive to sulfadimethoxine.

    LIMITATIONS: Sulfadimethoxine is not effective in viral or rickettsial infections, and as with any anti-bacterial agent, occasional failures in therapy may occur due to resistant microorganisms. The usual precautions in sulfonamide therapy should be observed.


    WARNING: Milk taken from animals during treatment and for 60 hours (5 milkings) after the latest treatment must not be used for food. Do not administer within 5 days of slaughter.

    A withdrawal period has not been established for this product in preruminating calves.

    Do Not Use in Calves to be Processed for Veal.


    PRECAUTIONS: During treatment period, make certain that animals maintain adequate water intake.

    If animals show no improvement within 2 or 3 days, consult your veterinarian.

    Tissue damage may result from perivascular infiltration.

    DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION: DI-METHOX (Sulfadimethoxine Injection 40%) must be administered only by the intravenous route in cattle. Cattle should receive 1 mL of DI-METHOX (Sulfadimethoxine Injection 40%) per 16 pounds of body weight (55 mg/kg) as an initial dose, followed by 0.5 mL per 16 pounds of body weight (27.5 mg/kg) every 24 hours thereafter. Sulfadimethoxine Boluses may be utilized for maintenance therapy in cattle. Representative weights and doses are indicated in the following table:

    Each mL contains 400 mg sulfadimethoxine:

    Animal Weight

    Initial Dose

    25 mg/lb (55 mg/kg)


    Subsequent Daily Doses

    12.5 mg/lb (27.5 mg/kg)

    Length of treatment depends on the clinical response. In most cases treatment for 3 to 5 days is adequate. Treatment should be continued until the animal is asymptomatic for 48 hours.

    NOTE: Store at room temperature. Should crystallization occur at cold temperatures, crystals will dissolve either by storing at room temperature for several days or by heating the vial in warm water. Crystallization and redissolution do not impair the efficacy of the product.

    HOW SUPPLIED: DI-METHOX (Sulfadimethoxine Injection 40%)- Each mL contains 400 mg sulfadimethoxine compounded with 20% propylene glycol, 1% benzyl alcohol (preservative), 0.1 mg disodium edetate, 1 mg sodium formaldehyde sulfoxylate, and pH adjusted with sodium hydroxide. 250 mL bottles.


    FOR INTRAVENOUS USE ONLY IN CATTLE

    RESTRICTED DRUG - USE ONLY AS DIRECTED (CALIFORNIA)
     
  10. Jcran

    Jcran Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the discourse! Yes, we are wet and soggy from Nov through Juneish. I am going to try them at the higher dose simply because my vet says that cocci is such an incredible problem here and I believe him! I
     
  11. Wendy

    Wendy Well-Known Member

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    That really was not called for. I also raise mine to milk, grow well, reproduce, & thrive. It was not necessary to make such a remark. Apparently you are one of the people that thinks your way is right & everyone else is wrong. One reason I don't post on this board much. I posted what I do & was under the impression that the dosage I use is the preventive dose. I have many fellow goat keepers that use the same dose. I did not mean to imply that my way was the only right way. Just stating how I do it. Do not assume that my goals are not the same as yours just because I do not do things the same. I have had goats almost 20 years.
     
  12. susanne

    susanne Nubian dairy goat breeder

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    the most important thing is to have a careful look at our goats and act accordingly. we can't have all the same management because our goats life in different conditions, have differnd diets, different clima . because my neighbor doesn't treat the goats the same as i do does not make his management bad.
    wendy if you are having good results in what you are doing i don't see any problems. i'm sure you have nice goats :)
     
  13. SherrieC

    SherrieC Well-Known Member

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    There are also a lot of people around who don't even treat for cocidiosis at all, in our cold area and haven't had problems with it "yet" but you know how it is with goats it always seems to be your Favorite goats that get sick.