Diggin' out the fire pit...

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by Red Devil TN, Sep 24, 2006.

  1. Red Devil TN

    Red Devil TN Well-Known Member

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    I have a fire pit about 15 foot long about 7 foot wide and it used to be about 2-3 foot deep.

    I have been cleaning the property and have burned only wood and stumps in there. There is dirt, charcoal, ash, etc. all mixed in as it's taken about 4 months to fill it while overcoming the rain wash.

    What can I do with it all? I have some huge compost piles going, would it be ok to mix with some soil and fresh cut field 'grass'? I mean this is a whole lot of stuff to just dig out and pile somewhere by itself, isn't it?

    TIA!!
     
  2. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    If you are burning stumps, you've apparently got enough land to spread it on without messing up a small area. If you've got real acidic soil, wouldn't be a problem to spread some as is and till them in. Or, simply spread them thin on grass or other non-tilled areas. The rate to use is 5 to 10 pounds per 100 square feet. If you've got big compost piles with lots of normal material, you can work it into them but I would not suggest more than 10%. Remember that those ashes are going to be highly alkaline. Just mixing some dirt and grass with them in a big separate pile won't do much good as it will still be so alkaline that only a few weeds will grow.

    Martin
     

  3. Rickstir

    Rickstir Well-Known Member

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    Depending on the brand of charcoal, like Kingsford, there could be heavy metals in the ash, which they use as part of the "binder" for their charcoal.
     
  4. Red Devil TN

    Red Devil TN Well-Known Member

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    No, it's natural formed charcoal that formed from the stumps collapsing in the fires. I'd like to spread it, but it's mixed with a lot of dirt clay and rock. It was all hardwood that was burned like oak, maple, dogwood, tupelo, etc. Most all of the wood (whole trees and stumps) was bulldozed into various piles by the PO. It wasn't any good for anything by the time we came around. Some would have made beautiful slabs. :(