Dietz Oil Lanterns

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by amelia, Nov 6, 2004.

  1. amelia

    amelia Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    403
    Joined:
    May 2, 2003
    Location:
    Washington State
    After hours on the Internet looking for info on basic hurricane-style oil lanterns, I still don't feel as though I have a very good handle on how to choose one. I'm looking at the Dietz "Blizzard" (Lehman's says 4.4 cp, 31 oz., 26 hours burn time) and the #20 Dietz Junior (9 cp, 9 oz., 12 hours). Other websites show some Dietz models called the "Victor Cold Blast" (9 cp, 17 oz. 23 hours) the "Comet Cold Blast" (6 cp, 6 oz., 13 hours) and the "Mars Cold Blast" (7 cp, 8 oz., 14 hrs.) Just wondering if those of you who have a Dietz lantern have any helpful advice.

    I'm kind of staring at these numbers and they don't make a lot of sense to me. Why, with one, would you get 12 hours out of 9 ounces of fuel at 9 candle power, and with another, get only 26 hours out of 31 ounces of fuel at 4.4 candle power (half the light)? Am I missing something?
     
  2. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,264
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2003
    Location:
    Whiskey Flats(Ft. Worth) , Tx
    ...............The larger the Candle Power.....the Brighter the Light is going too Be!!! IF , I was going to purchase a lamp , I would BUY ...2...lamps.....based upon (2) different "needs" . (1) for reading , cooking , and any other activity that would require a Well lit room, I would choose a Big CP number as you won't be using this lamp ALL the Time . (2) The other situation is where you need just enough light to function would require the 4.4 CP which says it lasts for 26 hours and holds 31 oz. of fuel . For minimal light you would probably want the Most Fuel efficient lantern available ,i.e. , where you get the longest burn without refueling , ....fordy.... :eek: :)
     

  3. amelia

    amelia Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    403
    Joined:
    May 2, 2003
    Location:
    Washington State
    Here's the thing I don't get, Fordy-- Both of those are burning about an ounce per hour, yet one is putting out twice the light as the other. Does this make any sense to you?
     
  4. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

    Messages:
    13,084
    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Location:
    Ontario
    No it doesn't perhaps its a typo? Deitz lanterns work fro flat wicks and its the width or that which gives you the cp. Maybe one source is listign the weight of the lantern instead of its fuel capacity? I have a Blizzard which is only really good as a walkway marker. We're so used to bright white light that we really don't function well with anything but the biggest deitz lanterns
     
  5. amelia

    amelia Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    403
    Joined:
    May 2, 2003
    Location:
    Washington State
    Hmm. And it looks like the Blizzard is one of the brighter ones, at 12 cp. I really don't have a very good sense of how much light various candle powers give off. Basically, I'm wanting to light up an 8x8 area enough, say, to play cards in.
     
  6. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,264
    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2003
    Location:
    Whiskey Flats(Ft. Worth) , Tx
    ................................................If , you get one that is TOO bright they'll beable to SEE what cards you're holding from the reflection off your shinny Fo'head :p ...Also , Strip poker ...should NOT be played with lotsa light as some folks lose more often(usually the FAT ones) than others :rolleyes: , ...fordy.... :eek: :)
     
  7. OD

    OD Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,523
    Joined:
    May 25, 2004
  8. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

    Messages:
    13,084
    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Location:
    Ontario
    Ok now I'm mixed up, the Blizzard #80 is not the one I'm thinking of, it is Ok to cast light for an 8x8 card playing light but it's a yellow light and might be difficult to read a paperback comfortably. Petromax is a terrific light (very bright white light) but if all you want is an inside light then Aladdin is the way to go for bright white light. For that matter propane lanterns are likely the simplest way to get lots of light easily. My cheapo propane coleman rivals the 350 petromax for light output at a quarter the cost. Nice thing about a Petromax is it will burn kero, diesel, gasoline, etc.
     
  9. MorrisonCorner

    MorrisonCorner Mansfield, VT for 200 yrs

    Messages:
    3,736
    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2004
    Location:
    VT
    I have kero lanters for emergency use and I find the smell gives me a headache. So we took Ross's advice some time ago and tried the Aladdin.. MUCH better.

    We also use candles, which don't seem to give off the fumes or have the effect of the keros. It may be that I'm just sensitive to them, and they do work well for getting to the barn (we use some WW2 models for outside use) but within an hour of lighting kero in the house, I have a splitting headache.
     
  10. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

    Messages:
    13,084
    Joined:
    May 9, 2002
    Location:
    Ontario
    You can use parrafin in these kero lanterns as well and it is virtually odour free.
     
  11. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    936
    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2003
    Location:
    Oklahoma
    I have several oil fueled lamps that are the type that work on the principle of a burning wick that is adjustable. The higher you turn the wick,the higher the flame,the more light it puts out... along with more smoke & fumes. The types of pressurized lanterns that use kerosene or some kind of refined oil are much brighter, but the Coleman- style pressureized lanterns that burn unleaded gasoline are the brightest of all. They ALL produce harmful fumes & smoke & are fairly dangerous when used indoors.They also pose an EXTREME fire hazzard if they are dropped or knocked over. They are usefull in emergencies, but I have been trying to move towards battery-type lights.Especially the rechargeable types.
     
  12. OD

    OD Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,523
    Joined:
    May 25, 2004
    I have an Aladdin lamp that I use for emergencies & it is VERY high maintenance. It has to be watched constantly & kept adjusted or the flame will get too high & burn a hole in the mantle. I've had to buy new wicks for it twice & haven't really used it that much. It does give a nice light when it's working right, but is a lot of trouble. Is this normal, or did I get a lemon?
     
  13. jwulf

    jwulf Member

    Messages:
    24
    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2004
    Location:
    OHIO
    I've got one of the Aladdin Genie II lamps and have been very pleased with it. I think it was on sale a Lehmans (might have been a second) for around $29.00 a couple of years ago. It is very bright and if you use the high quality oil the smell is negligible. It uses a mantel so it does require a bit more "skill" in lighting as opposed to a wick, but it's pretty easy to learn, and well worth the effort considering the amount of light that you get.

    -jwulf
     
  14. Freeholder

    Freeholder Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,665
    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2004
    Years ago we had an older, American-made, Dietz lantern and were very happy with it. Then we bought a newer, Chinese-made, one and the reservoir leaked. Not good. Not happy. They are all made in China now, so hopefully their quality is better, but I would just get one to see, before you invest in a house-ful.

    Aladdins give off excellent light. They are very hot, so you need to be really careful with them. The regular kerosene lamps WILL give you a headache if you try to read by their light for more than a few minutes. The reason is that the flame flickers a little bit. Propane lights (Humphrey and other brands) can have the same problem if not cleaned regularly. A three or four-wick candle inside a glass chimney will give off as much light as a regular flat-wick kerosene lamp (still flickers, though), and in my opinion is safer if knocked over, since the solid fuel doesn't flow. Any open flame needs to be handled with extreme care, though, and should never be left unattended in a child's room, especially.

    Kathleen in Oregon
     
  15. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

    Messages:
    14,953
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    Between Crosslake and Emily Minnesota
    You're gonna have a heck of a time reading cards by ANY kerosene lantern. I have a 500 PetroMax and several Aladdin lamps. Besides light, the 350 Petromax will probably provide enough heat to warm the entire 8 x 8 foot room that you're talking about.

    My suggestion is to use an Aladdin...no fumes and bright light. The mantle of the Aladdin is like a catlytic filter...it burns off the smelly kerosene hydrocarbons.
     
  16. amelia

    amelia Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    403
    Joined:
    May 2, 2003
    Location:
    Washington State
    Thank you all for the great replies. It looks like the hands-down favorite for regular indoor use is the Aladdin, although the Dietz lanterns appear to be a good alternative for occasional or emergency use when brightness is not a big issue. From what I've gathered, the Petromax is a real winner, but as with any pressurized fuel lamp, it has more safety issues and can't be used indoors.

    I e-mailed Lehman's in an attempt to get an explanation for the inconsistency in candle power ratings of Dietz lanterns. Apparently I was comparing apples to oranges--each company has its own rating system. (Kind of like going shopping for women's clothing these days--What was a Size 10 five years ago is now a Size 6.) Lehman's appears to be the most conservative (and upfront) about it. It rates the Blizzard, with its hefty 7/8" wick, at 4.4 cp, while a number of Internet competitors are rating it at 12 cp--three times that. Lehman's "standard" is a 60-watt bulb which its test rated at 29 cp. This would mean that the Blizzard is putting out about 9 watts worth of light.

    I've also learned that all of the Dietz models, except for the Monarch, are "cold blast." From what I understand, "cold blast" lanterns give off a white, as opposed to yellow, light, and tend to flicker less.

    The research continues. . .