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Duchess of Cynicism
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Hoo-Boy!! Found the littermate of the rabbit that died this past weekend in poor condition yesterday morning-- underweight, dehydrated, and plain sorry looking. He was trying to drink, and trying to eat-- but not much effort was being expended.

I could NOT find my bottle of Ivomec, a drug suggested in the BarbisBunnies article-- so I dosed him up real good with a sub-Q injection of B-Complex. Half an hour later, he was slurping up water nicely, and then a bit later, chowing down-- not fast- but still eating, his pellets. This morning, he is a bit happier looking, and his mouth is functioning so much better.
I am still looking for my Ivomec-- But will hit this fella again with more B-Complex this afternoon. His tummy is full, and he is no longer dehydrated. Acting normally for him.
 

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Cool!
So, did you have a B complex for shots, or did you have to crush some pills and mix them with water?
If I understand correctly- he was trying to open his mouth earlier but couldn't?
Do you think it could be tetanus?

Just pondering.
 

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B Vitamin complex seems to be very useful. Sometimes chicks develop a kind a mobility problem at 2 -3 weeks old, as a result of a Vitamin B deficiency. Their legs become increasingly paralysed until the can't stand or walk. I had one last year like that but he was too far gone by the time I found out what was wrong to benefit from a Vitamin B rich diet and I ended up culling him.

I wonder why in rabbits it results in inability to eat and drink? Does it affect the jaw joints/muscles? Do you think the source of the problem is genetic, dietary or what?
 

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Duchess of Cynicism
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Discussion Starter #4
the B Complex vitamins are extremely important in nerve function, metabolism, and- well, they just seem to affect EVERYTHING!!! They are known as the "stress" vitamins. They do help one's body deal with all sorts of stressors.

When I returned home after this mornings library visit-- I found one of my original AmChin Adults in a bad way-- she 'greeted' me, then fell over-- her ears were flaming red. I fear I killed her in my attempt to cool her off--her heart started to vibrate rather than beat-- She went quickly, in my arms.

I have decided, for my time away at the fairs, I will be leaving behind some dissolved B-Complex with C in a few gallons of water, with instructions to make sure at least one cup gets into every water supply every morning.

I keep an injectable form available for my animals-- and have in the past, withdrawn some from the vial and put it in their water-- But I need to leave the vial as intact as poosible, just in case I need to call someone to administer some emergency stuff when I am gone.

yesterday's little fella is doing great-- I am not sure the lack of B vitamins is necessarily dietary-- the body uses them up pretty fast, and cannot store them the way they can fat soluble vitamins. There is a form of anemeia which is caused by the bodys failure toproperly absorb B vitamins. When my B levels are low, I experience a lot more pain and inflammation in my joints (I am extremely arthritic) I handle heat a lot better myself if i keep my B levels up-- that Propel Fitness water is great-- for me, it provides so much of what helps me make it through the day...
 

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Sorry to hear about your AmChin doe, Terry. :( You must really be having some hot weather! I never thought of Ohio as having a climate much different from Southern Ontario. We're supposed to be in for a hot week here, so maybe the heat is just reaching us now. I hate hot weather... and I'm very glad that our summer rabbitry is just about the coolest place on the property -- in the shade of a huge weeping willow from about 10:00 AM until evening -- so it is rare for my rabbits to get overheated. I did take a spray bottle down one very hot day and misted over their heads so it drifted down on them. They liked it once they got used to the feeling.

I find Vitamin B Complex capsules helpful for lowering my anxiety level and now that I think about it, I have noticed since I've been taking them that my arthritic knee is less painful and stiff.

Can the contents of a capsule be mixed into the rabbit's water if the need were to arise? I find even with the capsule intact they have a disagreeable taste. Would the rabbits reject the water as a result, do you think? (Just learning and looking ahead here.)
 

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bluebird2o2 said:
I never heard of B complex for rabbits but i will get some now.bluebird
It is not customary to supplement with the B complex. The practice
of coprophagy (eating cecotropes) allows bacteria to synthesize
the vitamins in the feces. These vitamins are then absorbed.
Wouldn't most diets supply sufficient B Vitamins from forages
and grain?
:shrug:

IMO, it would follow that a rabbit "off feed" might benefit from
supplementation.

Rabbits synthesize Vitamin C from glucose in their tissues. I'll check
but I don't believe there is a dietary requirement for this listed
for rabbits.
 

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Duchess of Cynicism
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Discussion Starter #8
dlwelch said:
It is not customary to supplement with the B complex. The practice
of coprophagy (eating cecotropes) allows bacteria to synthesize
the vitamins in the feces. These vitamins are then absorbed.
Wouldn't most diets supply sufficient B Vitamins from forages
and grain?
:shrug:
For those of us who house our rabbits on wire, with the droppings leaving the cage-- this natural process is interrupted


IMO, it would follow that a rabbit "off feed" might benefit from
supplementation.

Rabbits synthesize Vitamin C from glucose in their tissues. I'll check
but I don't believe there is a dietary requirement for this listed
for rabbits.
Any time an animal is off it's feed, something is not working correctly- so supplementation with THE PROPER AIDS could be beneficial

I had two rabbits failing fast this morning(it was only 70 degrees outside)-- some quick shots of B-Complex, and a mix of honey, orange gatorade, and more B-Complex brought them around very quickly.

I am not liking what is happening to my smaller breed rabbits-- major changes are about to take place.....
 

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I'm a little lost, but my bunns consume the cecotropes right from their anus when they're in good health...it looks like they're just licking themselves, but if you watch closely, they're actually consuming *something*.

I might be missing something though. :shrug:
 

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For those of us who house our rabbits on wire, with the droppings leaving the cage-- this natural process is interrupted
With all due respect for your opinion, raising rabbits in wire cages
does not interrupt the natural process of coprophagy. The cecotropes
are consumed by the rabbit directly from the anus. They are produced
in clusters with a gel-like substance around them and are very soft.
Having them deposited on the cage floor would probably make for very
messy cages.

FWIW, I only raise rabbits in wire caging.

I hope things improve for your rabbits.

Edited:
Hannah, I just saw your post. You are not missing anything as that
is the normal process.
 

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I have one quick question- I have a nursing doe who does not handle this heat well, should I give her some B complex in her water and how much should I give?
 

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"Sometimes chicks develop a kind a mobility problem at 2 -3 weeks old, as a result of a Vitamin B deficiency."

Rabbit chicks? Feathered or fured?!
 

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moopups said:
"Sometimes chicks develop a kind a mobility problem at 2 -3 weeks old, as a result of a Vitamin B deficiency."

Rabbit chicks? Feathered or fured?!
Oh, come on! You're pulling my leg, aren't you? :rolleyes:

Feathered chicks, Moopups. Chicken chicks. Peepers. :D

I was trying to better understand Vitamin B deficiency problems and therefore cited the only instance of which I have first hand experience.

Baby rabbits are kits. The only time you get rabbit "chicks" is when the Cadbury bunny hatches hers. :rotfl:
 
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