Did I get taken?

Discussion in 'Goats' started by farmprincess, Aug 21, 2005.

  1. farmprincess

    farmprincess Member

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    I bought my first dairy goat, a four month old Nubian, after much research and was so excited. First she got really sick and almost died. The vet thought she had a brain abcess that developed as a result of a cold she had when I got her, that caused a bunch of central nervous system problems including some massive seizures. After several weeks of antibiotics and vitamin b shots she seems perfectly healthy. She is now 5 months old. While reading Storey's guide to dairy goats I saw that she should not have two teats per side, only one. The book said the extra teats could be removed at birth (little too late for that) and also says that she may not be milkable. I am heartbroken. I love this little goat and we have been through so much with her. I will keep her regardless, but we don't have much money and got a milking goat to help ease the grocery budget. Does anyone know if she is milkable in this condition? Can the extra teats still be removed? Should I worry about her earlier illness's effect on milk? Any info welcome. Thank you.
     
  2. westbrook

    westbrook In Remembrance

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    Look on the bright side... if she has 3 or 4 kids...she can nurse them all!
     

  3. Lt. Wombat

    Lt. Wombat Well-Known Member

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    The 2 pseudo teats probably won't be an issue and she'll milk fine. The only pseudo's we ever had was from boer breedings as I think multi teats is the boer standard. We never bothered to remove them as they were not show goats.

    If I'm wrong someone will be along shortly to give you a different opinion.
     
  4. JR05

    JR05 Well-Known Member

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    I also have an Alpine that has extras! We have had NO problems with milking, she is one of the easiest and best to milk. If you are planning to show her then she would be disqualified. Also check her babies when they are born if girls have extras,then they can't show either even if you have them removed. Now you said she was 5 months old, my vet says that they can be removed as long as she isn't milking. They must have time to heal before you breed, but personally if they are not interfering with your milking I would just leave them alone. I personally would be more worried about her nervilogical
    (?) state then the extra teats.

    JR05
     
  5. Milk n' Honey

    Milk n' Honey Well-Known Member

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    It would not be preferable, in my opinion, to breed her at all. This is an undesirable trait that would most likely be passed on to babies. Obvious genetic flaws, I'd stay away from. There isn't anyone who knows about this that would choose a kid from a line with this flaw. It just presents to many possible problems. I'm so sorry that you got her before knowing this. I'm sure you are quite attached to her. Why not just keep her for a pet and not worry about breeding her? If you are truly wanting a milking doe, maybe try getting another goat. It would be good for her to have the company. Problem is, it isn't really going to be as cost efficient. However, most people suggest having at least 2 goats anyway. Maybe you already do? Anyway, she may or may not be able to be milked and it might even be a problem for raising babies. I'd seriously consider starting over with a different goat whether you keep her or not. This is just my opinion. I'll ask you this though....knowing what you know now, would you buy her or her kids from someone else? If not, I wouldn't expect anyone else to either. No matter what you decide, I wish you all the luck. Goats are the best and even if you never breed her, she'll be a great companion!! Take care.
     
  6. redcedarfarm

    redcedarfarm Active Member

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    In boer shows it is a fault for the doe NOT to have 4 teats from what I understand.
     
  7. Goat Freak

    Goat Freak Slave To Many Animals

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    Idon't know about that, I have BOers andthere is such thing as a two teated Boer and from what I understand they are "supposed" to be more valuble, we only have one two teater and he is a boy although we do plan on getting some two teaters out of his future daughters.
     
  8. redcedarfarm

    redcedarfarm Active Member

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    OK this is what my vet did when I had a doe with four teats.... he just cut the psuedo's OFF! He took some scissors and that was it. Never had a problem with that doe.
     
  9. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I have heard of this but not seen it. This is what I have heard.

    I have heard that the extra teat makes it hard to milk with a machine, and *IF* there is milk produced by the extra teat that it is messy to hand milk.

    If it is messy to hand milk, obviously it is possible to milk.

    And, yes, treatment of choice is to remove the extra while the goat is small.

    I do not know about what you want to do about genetics and whether or not you want to avoid passing this on: this is an individual choice. I WILL say that with cattle, they will sometimes cross a dairy cow with a beef cow and sell all of the offspring for beef. That way they still get to milk the cow, and yet the genetic flaw is not passed on.

    I WILL say that a lot of people do not sweat the extra teat, and consider it of little importance.
     
  10. farmprincess

    farmprincess Member

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    Your replies were great. An update, my baby girl is so happy now that she has sisters! I had been looking for months when a rescue Pygmy doe and a British (can't remember) both came to me FREE. As a student, my slim budget really appreciated this. Our British something goat may be pregnant so we are excited. We are currently researching petting zoo's in the event that she has a buck. We are not tough farm folk yet. We are city slickers with a barn and a dream and don't have whatever it takes to kill a goat. (Am I a hypocrite if I fill my freezer half a steer from my friend's organic beef farm? Probably but I can't kill a cute little goat) I most likely will not breed my little four teated doe after all your advice. Her name is Amelia, because, like all Nubians, she has those adorable flappy ears and looks like Amelia Earhart! I need to figure out how old this little Pygmy girl is. I have no info on her at all. If any one knows how to tell a goat's age, (teeth???) I would love to know. Thanks again!
    Bless and comfort all those that are suffering in New Orleans tonight.
     
  11. westbrook

    westbrook In Remembrance

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    Boer Does with 4 teats.. I didn't think it was considered a fault. Was the breed standard changed in the last 3 years? Yes 2 teats for all dairy breeds... was the person that told you that dairy?

    breed standard from ABGA....

    DOES
    Does should have well formed udders with good attachment with the number of functional teats not to exceed two per side. A split teat with two distinctly separated teats and openings with at least 50% of the body of teat separated is permissible but teats without a split are preferred. It is most important that the udder is constructed so that the offspring are able to nurse unassisted.

    Faults : Udder and teat abnormalities or defects to include but not limited to oversized or bulbous teats, pendulous udder.
    Disqualifications: Cluster teats, fishtail teats or a doe that has not kidded or exhibited signs of pregnancy by 24 months of age.

    Canadian Boer Standard
    Does:
    Well-formed udder firmly attached with no more than two functional teats per side. One teat on each side, or two teats per side; well separated is desirable.
    Undesirable Characteristics
    Fish or cluster teats; blind teats.

    or you can refer here
    http://members.psyber.com/macgoats/IndexTHREEmacgoats.htm#TEATS COMPARISONS

    am I still working under old breed standards?
     
  12. westbrook

    westbrook In Remembrance

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    Farmprioncess...

    get your nubian bred to a Boer buck!!!! just be prepared to sell the kids and don't ask what anyone is going to do with them.. then take the money you get from the kids and go buy a nice registered nubian doeling.