Did I do this the right way or not?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by daytrader, May 4, 2006.

  1. daytrader

    daytrader Well-Known Member

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    I seeded my pasture lots for the sheep.

    The cull rate was not great for breeders so I wait.

    Grass is getting nice and high. 2 foot easy.

    The guy across the road from me has 3 horses. They are eatting roots. Nothing there.

    He stopped into the store I opened asking what I would charge him to let his horses grase the area till his was up for feed again.

    I told HIM NOTHING AT ALL. I figured free lawn mowing and fertilizer. He takes care of them daily and installed his own water tank that he keeps filled.

    I was told I could charge 150 a head today for this. That dosn't seem right to me. Is that common? He even provided a saddle and leads. They are like rental horses. We ride them and have fun with them and he takes care of the maintenace.

    I did tell them he had to take those horses off union pay. They are not keeping up with the grass I planted. He was very sure they would be able to do it. NOT A CHANCE IN K-MART.

    Did I rip myself off or make a fair trade?
     
  2. susieM

    susieM Well-Known Member

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    You made yourself a good neighborhood.
     

  3. Jenn

    Jenn Well-Known Member Supporter

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    At $150/head (per year?) you wouldn't get free horse rides for your family or a god relation with the neighbor. BTW check on insurance issues re homeowners and maybe if the co would raise your rates because of teh horsees ask the neighbor to pay that extra cost.

    But maybe you need more than three horses on that land? For nonneighbors charge what's usual in the area?
     
  4. insanity

    insanity Well-Known Member

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    Yep! And there priceless! :)
     
  5. ChickenTracy

    ChickenTracy Well-Known Member

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    I'd also say you made a good neighbor too. There's a piece of property connected to mine & the elderly owners live in another county (town) but planted a garden next door. I let them store their tiller, fertalizer,etc in the garage & they had free access to the water hose & buckets to water their garden about once a week when they came to tend it. I'd felt terrible charging. Only way I feel comfortable charging is if I'm working a job that is making a company money then I expect my share!:D But, the neighbors it's different.;)
     
  6. MorrisonCorner

    MorrisonCorner Mansfield, VT for 200 yrs

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    I agree.. in an area with a lot of second homes it isn't uncommon for a second home owner to let a farmer graze their animals on an unused field at no charge. Keeps the field trimmed and gives the farmer room for expansion. The family usually gets a little lamb or beef for their good gesture. You're getting to play with the horses. Good exchange I'd say.
     
  7. susieM

    susieM Well-Known Member

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    I don't remember how it works, in the US....but, over here, you do have to be careful, as the user could claim 'squatter's rights', after a time.
     
  8. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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    I think you did the right thing
     
  9. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I agree a good neighborly thing to do, you benefit from cared for horses you can ride and they should (after the initial curiosity wears off) companion graze with sheep just fine!!
     
  10. DownHome

    DownHome Well-Known Member

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    You did a wonderful neighborly thing. However, just because you are a great neighbor doesn't necessarily mean your neighbor will be a great neighbor. I would be very careful riding anyone elses property. How do you suppose he would feel if, even by some crasy accident his horse breaks a leg, while you are riding it. Would he consider that you feed his horses for free and cut his loses or would he expect you to pay for another horse. Something in writing may not be a bad idea or you could choose not to ride his horses.

    Just my 2 cents. Seen too much of that stuff go sour. Sounds like it is a wonderful situation so far. Hope it stays that way.
     
  11. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Horse owners are known for paying goobs of money, so you coulda charged $150 a month for boarding his horses.

    But, you are a good neighbor this way, & you get to use the horses this way. All in all you are ahead _this_ way.

    You have a rental agreement, no squatter's rights issues. However, you do have an insurance issue. Should a horse get hurt (rock, gopher hole, eat poisonious growth), or get out & harm a car or other property - people in this country like to sue, & you will be named in the suit. Only bad part of your deal. Check your insurance policy.

    --->Paul
     
  12. Shygal

    Shygal Unreality star Supporter

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    Seeing how you say you are a millionaire several times over, I don't see the issue in whether you lost out on $450 or not :rolleyes:
     
  13. DixyDoodle

    DixyDoodle stranger than fiction

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    Around my area, to rent a horse to ride for ONE HOUR costs $25 and up. What do you think? I think you got an awesome deal!

    If you bill the guy, maybe he'll decide to either bill you back for the riding or just put his horses back on his own land. For $150 a month, he can buy hay to feed his horses. Meanwhile, you will have an overgrown field and maybe have to pay $200 to have it cut down several times a year (well, again, that's what it would cost here).

    DD
     
  14. Big Dave

    Big Dave Well-Known Member

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    It Ain't always show me the money. It seems as though when you struck that bargain you thought you were getting a good deal. You helped out a fella that will come into your store and make a few purchases over time. The pay off for you my friend is in the fine reputation you have started to build for yourself.
     
  15. clovis

    clovis Well-Known Member

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    I think you set up the best deal going. Free riding whenever you want? That is a bargain! You made a great neighbor....it is sad there isn't more giving between neighbors any more.
    My folks have new neighbors that have 5 horses on 2 1/2 acres. They turned a beautiful pasture into a mud lot. My parents have 2 1/2 acres growing in pasture that they will have to mow this year. These new neighbors are city people...it is their way or no way. My folks had offered to allow them to use the field as pasture on a rotating basis for FREE, but the neighbors insisted on having use ALL the time, or not at all. Go figure. The neighbor spends $15 a day on hay in the summer.
    Anyway, I would consider drawing up a contract/lease with your neighbor, and make him sign it. I would not allow anyone other than his immediate family to ride on your property. I would add a clause that you are not liable for anything. I would add a clause stating you may end the lease at any time for any reason. Then I would charge him $1 a year for the use of the pasture. This will help make you less liable in case of a lawsuit, but still a great neighbor.
    Clove
     
  16. daytrader

    daytrader Well-Known Member

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    The horses are catching up slowly. He did pull one horse out ad put in two more.

    These other two he put in are unbroken. In the years past I rode PBRA. I told him I would be more then happy to try and break them down. He said have at it.

    He is a good guy. I had to tend to some fence mending. He was right there to help. I pay to have my grass and such mowed each week. I was out there weed eatting around the bottom wire of the fence the other day.

    I stopped him and said you do not have to do that. I have a guy that dose that. He said I just figured I had to do mine, I may as well do yours.

    I never really chatted with this guy much. He is a good guy.

    I purchased a new goat that was about 200 miles away. I was talking with him about it. I told him (yesterday) I had to leave today in the am to go pick him up. His remark. WHAT TIME ARE WE LEAVING? He drove and pulled his horse trailer.

    He lives in the city, BUT his brother owns the place next door and dosn't give a dang about it. He is country, his brother is city. Go figure.
     
  17. Valmai

    Valmai Well-Known Member

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    Yep A good neighbour!!!!!! Both of you.
     
  18. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    15 years ago I rented a horse for the summer. I paid about $100 a month for him. Allowing for inflation, the worth of the riding is equal to the value of the use of your pasture.

    It sounds to me to be perfectly fair: you get the use of the horses for the use of the pasture. A perfectly equal trade. Also, a good neighbor to boot!