diatomaceous earth

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by Bluehare, Apr 30, 2017.

  1. Bluehare

    Bluehare Member

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    does anyone mix de with their feed? i have heard it helps control some parasites particularly coccsidia in rabbits and chickens- anyone know of any scientific studies or veterinary recommendations ?
     
  2. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm This Space For Rent Supporter

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    DE has no effect on internal parasites, and no nutritional benefits.
    It's mostly Silica (chemically the same as sand) and passes through the body unchanged.
     
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  3. dyrne

    dyrne Well-Known Member

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    That seems to disagree with every result I get when I google "diatomaceous earth kill internal parasites". Obviously if you have parasites in the musculature it wouldn't do anything but if you're talking the intestinal tract, the common wisdom seems to be that diatomaceous earth is very sharp and kind of serrated so damages parasites that come into contact with it.
     
  4. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm This Space For Rent Supporter

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    If you will read closely how it works, it kills insects by "abrasion and dehydration".
    It doesn't work at all once it's wet.

    Also note the vast majority of the sites that sing it's praises are also trying to sell you some.

    The parasites in an animals stomach never "come into contact" with the particles due to the thin layer of liquid which keeps them separated.

    http://npic.orst.edu/factsheets/degen.html
    Don't fall for the sales hype.
    DE is worthless for treating internal parasites.

    http://extension.umd.edu/learn/diatomaceous-earth-de
    http://www.sheepandgoat.com/articles/DE.html
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2017
  5. dyrne

    dyrne Well-Known Member

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    I'm not trying to be argumentive but here's one study.

    Summary:
    """
    ... BB hens treated with dietary DE had significantly lower Capillaria FEC, slightly lower Eimeria FEC, fewer birds infected with Heterakis, and significantly lower Heterakis worm burden than control BB hens. ...
    BB hens consuming the DE diet laid larger eggs containing more albumen and yolk than hens consuming the control diet. In a subsequent experiment, the effectiveness of DE to treat a Northern fowl mite (Ornithonyssus sylviarum) infestation was tested. Relative to controls, both breeds of hens that were dusted with DE had reduced number of mites. The results of this study indicate the DE has the potential to be an effective treatment to help control parasites and improve production of organically raised, free-range layer hens."""


    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21673156
     
  6. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm This Space For Rent Supporter

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    Yes, that's one study that showed some positive results in some of the birds, and negative results in the rest of the birds.

    The Northern Fowl Mites mentioned are external parasites.

    It concludes "it has the potential", which means it might or might not.

    From your source:
    There are many more studies showing it has no effect than there are showing any positive results.
    https://www.cambridge.org/core/jour...-beef-steers/1E1900A4511C675D94FFFB0818EAB60B

    This is the first study you posted in it's entirety:
    https://academic.oup.com/ps/article...ous-earth-on-parasite-load-egg?searchresult=1

    They stated:
    They noted the hens fed DE increased food intake, but also stated:
    So eating plain sand can have the same effects in that regard.
    Eating more would explain the larger egg size.
     
    Last edited: May 1, 2017