diagnosis needed .... ignorance isn't always bliss

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Thatch, Jun 3, 2005.

  1. Thatch

    Thatch Well-Known Member

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    First off let me say I don't know much about goats so .....

    I'm caring for a few Nubian goats for the former owners of my property. (until they get their farm set up) and we recently had one of the young girls go down (I think about 1.5-2 years old) I went out to feed the goats and while filling the water I saw her collapse and fall against the barn wall.... I tried to get her back up but she couldn't stand. She had no control over her limbs. Her eyesight seemed to be effected as well. I called the vet and had them come out. (not my animals so I'm covering my bases) They came out and gave her an IV of fluids (dextrose I believe) but it made no difference. The vet said that the dextrose solution should of caused a significant improvement in the animal if it was a feed/water issue and they guessed at listeria. There was no improvement of the goat and it was decided to do a necropsy and she was put down in an effort to find the problem to save the other 3 goats. (one in the same pen, two in a connected pen).

    Well, the one in the shared pen started showing similar muscle control problems and she had gone off her feed and water. We tried directing the goat to eat and drink with some success but not much. We gave vitamins liquid to the goat, which it took but didn't seem to do much. We were contemplating putting her down as it got worse. Finally we got a turkey baster and went in and started force feeding the goat water. About 3-4 basters full at a time. We saw rather immediate changes in the goat, subtle but definite improvement. We're now 3 days out from starting this and the goat is now taking in feed and water on it's own, not quite up to it's former levels but a good amount. It now seems to have it's limb control back and is back to it's normal behavior. All signs point to the goat heading for a full recovery.

    So, the results from the necropsy aren't back yet (in retrospect it seems that was a big waste (not of my money) since we had to take it on our own to address the problem without that knowledge) but we've got the other sick one on the mend and the other two (in the connected pen) were never effected. Do you have a clue what it might have been?

    J
     
  2. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    Do a search on listerosis, and you will see what an idiot that vet was with his treatment.

    What is the goats diet? Is there any mold in the bottom of the grain feeders, or the hay? Or are you using old straw or hay for bedding and they are eating it because they are hungry? Mold is usually the culprit with listerosis. Listerosis is usually a herd wide problem, the milk from the does should not be drank.

    But you also have polio (poliomilitis encephalitis) which is vitamin B1 defficency. This can be caused by mold also, by bad grain, eating something toxic or posionous so that it kills the beneficial bacteria in the rumen. A god makes all it's B1/thiamin in the active functioning healthy rumen. Large doses of B1, and replenishing the bacteria with probiotics. Rumen contents at necropsy will be key in finding out what is wrong with the does. Do you see the doe chewing her cud? Vicki
     

  3. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    "A god," Vicki? Would that be a Freudian slip? :haha: :haha: :haha:

    I can't argue with that!
     
  4. Thatch

    Thatch Well-Known Member

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    The diet (as perscribed by the owners) one cup of sweetfeed (10% if I recall correctly) along with one leaf of timothy hay in the mornings, another leaf of timothy in the evening. Feed is all kept in a dry barn in a sealed container. No mold in the container. Hay is all nice and dry as well. We didn't see cud chewing, but we did see some teeth grinding... nothing actually being chewed.

    We just got word back from the vet that the necropsy. Seems it showed it to be polio. Not that that tells me much. Is this typically fatal? Seems we must of lucked into a way to treat the goat... or at least giving her enough time to fix herself.

    Thanks for your input.

    J
     
  5. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    Yep Laura :haha: Guess I should at least read through my own posts!

    Thatch, you have to do what the owners want, send them on their way as soon as you can. If you get goats do some homework first, sweetfeed and a flake of timothy hay does not a healthy goat make. Vicki
     
  6. Misty

    Misty Misty Gonzales

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    treatment for polio is as follows:
    Kid goats: 3cc pen orally
    500 mg thiamin orally. Make sure and read your bottle as thiamin comes in different strengths. 200 mg would need 2.5cc, 1000 mg would be 1.2 cc and so on.

    Adult goats: 10 cc pen orally
    500 mg thiamin orally.
     
  7. kathy H

    kathy H kathyh

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    Thatch goat polio cures easy if caught early, after the b1 shot three hours latter wow what a difference. Our goat Mocha got it after hubby[ who is used to feeding horses] grained her to heavly. Probies every few hours helps after shot to get cud going again and maylox twice a day helps to.Might want to cut out grain for a while tell they are better.