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Keep reading. Other links provide info on water harvesting in deserts.
I did start reading about the microwave harvested device and saw that it can work in deserts. But then I stopped when mail read what it was producing.
You lost me here:
"The harvester reliably produced 0.7 liters per kilogram (2.2 lbs) of absorber per day—nearly three cups of clean, pure H2O."

While I do feel this is technology that should be studied more, I think it needs refinement before it could be implemented practically on a large enough scale to homestead. It IS pretty fascinating, though
 

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OH my Andi grew up very near where you are, just over in NM. In the oilfield. In a lease camp. And that was a huge blessing for me because it taught me that you have to do for yourself, homemade fun, entertainment, etc. And now my heart bleeds to the fingernails for you because I finally got to move to.....yep, the Ozarks. Love my farmette.

You cannot reasonably anyway no how live there like you did here. Never will get there. Best thing is to make friends with some oldtimers of the Hispanic persuasion. There are natural plants to harvest. At least you don't need a clothes dryer lol! You cannot just get water out of the river.....water rights and rules are extremely detailed and stringent. But if your county allows, you can use and reuse your water endlessly almost. Might be illegal to do a gray system BUT even in the rv park few complain if you cautiously and maybe even out of sight reuse your dish water, bath or shower water, etc. Every gallon should get used indoors twice before outdoors. Dishes rinse water can mop the floor then water the plants. If you use hot enough water you need no soap and the water can go outside also.

Gotta go cook, and man I feel for you! Except when the twisters go by lol.
 

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OH my Andi grew up very near where you are, just over in NM. In the oilfield. In a lease camp. And that was a huge blessing for me because it taught me that you have to do for yourself, homemade fun, entertainment, etc. And now my heart bleeds to the fingernails for you because I finally got to move to.....yep, the Ozarks. Love my farmette.

You cannot reasonably anyway no how live there like you did here. Never will get there. Best thing is to make friends with some oldtimers of the Hispanic persuasion. There are natural plants to harvest. At least you don't need a clothes dryer lol! You cannot just get water out of the river.....water rights and rules are extremely detailed and stringent. But if your county allows, you can use and reuse your water endlessly almost. Might be illegal to do a gray system BUT even in the rv park few complain if you cautiously and maybe even out of sight reuse your dish water, bath or shower water, etc. Every gallon should get used indoors twice before outdoors. Dishes rinse water can mop the floor then water the plants. If you use hot enough water you need no soap and the water can go outside also.

Gotta go cook, and man I feel for you! Except when the twisters go by lol.
Ugh so you're familiar with my pain? Lol
I'm hoping by next Spring I can just head back to the ozarks or the Ouachitas. Oklahoma, Missouri, Arkansas doesnt matter. Although having been raised in my later teens years in Oklahoma and raising my kids there, I'm still partial to south central Missouri.
I miss the woods, creeks, rivers, and wildlife. A cabin in the woods sounds so refreshing right now.
Oh well...Ce la vie
At least its cooled off a little here and I can get 5 gallon jugs of drinking water filled for $1 each. I have 7 jugs so that's 35 gallons. I buy an extra one every chance I get.
 

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First two house hunting trips down here we found nothing. Last trip we found one possible in the Ouchitas, it turned out to have a legal entanglement. Nada in Arkansas, our original goal. But found several in south central Mo, and took our pick.

I grew up in a little place called Loco Hills NM. Thought it was pretty compared to your area, lol. Back then the blue quail were high in population and hunting them was fun. IF you had water the sandy ground looks bad but would grow ANYTHING. This was before the aquifer was depleted to the point the soil started getting too saline.

My folks went from east Texas to NM in 1947. My mom would keep it together til dad went to work, cry all day he was gone missing east Texas, get it together before he came home. But they stuck it out, and both lived in NM the rest of their lives.

I have not lived in southern NM since 1977. Did spend 14 years up in the 4 corners area.

I will think of you while we are out on our picnic in the woods today!
 

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You've made some decisions, so I don't know if the following is too late. We homestead, but for a number of reasons (mainly the oil/gas industry in our county), we haul our own water.

What I can tell you is that it is feasible, at any scale, if you haul it yourself ...

I found that when we owned a home in the city, or rented in a smaller community nearby, we had water bills in the 1000's of gallons per month range, no matter what we did; it's the nature of the beast. When we got onto the homestead, we used less than 500 gallons per month, for a family of 4, and we aren't paying double (water in, sewage out, for the same amount of gallons). We pay 4 cents/gallon, hauled ourselves.

I think you can buy an inexpensive piece of land, park something on it to live in, and haul your own water ... I've seen folks pull up to the water station with various containers, depending on what they had at hand and what they haul with (a car, truck, dually truck, or a trailer). Not knowing your capabilities or skills, just start small, and grow into it.

I don't know the rain patterns in your neck of the woods, but there is almost always some amount of rainfall; a secondary route for your water needs is to be prepared to catch/utilize whatever does fall, in the quantity it falls in. Usually, a desert region doesn't get much, and when it does, it gets it all at once.

I'd guess that the decision might boil down to what you can do, yourself, out on a piece of dirt of your own, for the same $650/mo you pay to live on someone else's piece of dirt. I'd pay a lot, and put up with a lot, to get out from underneath someone else's control. I'd turn that piece of dirt into my own chunk of heaven ... after eating or otherwise evicting the rattlesnakes.

Hope this helps ...
 

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BTW, a good portion of our used water goes right back out onto the property ... in the form of greywater. We treat/filter it, and spread it around for various uses. Rarely do we send it to the septic system ... we don't drink it, but it's still good water, with some cycles left in it!

In your case, perhaps this would help improve the area for you. All kinds of designs, and books, to divert greywater to ponds, treat it, and benefit plants/critters.
 

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You've made some decisions, so I don't know if the following is too late. We homestead, but for a number of reasons (mainly the oil/gas industry in our county), we haul our own water.

What I can tell you is that it is feasible, at any scale, if you haul it yourself ...

I found that when we owned a home in the city, or rented in a smaller community nearby, we had water bills in the 1000's of gallons per month range, no matter what we did; it's the nature of the beast. When we got onto the homestead, we used less than 500 gallons per month, for a family of 4, and we aren't paying double (water in, sewage out, for the same amount of gallons). We pay 4 cents/gallon, hauled ourselves.

I think you can buy an inexpensive piece of land, park something on it to live in, and haul your own water ... I've seen folks pull up to the water station with various containers, depending on what they had at hand and what they haul with (a car, truck, dually truck, or a trailer). Not knowing your capabilities or skills, just start small, and grow into it.

I don't know the rain patterns in your neck of the woods, but there is almost always some amount of rainfall; a secondary route for your water needs is to be prepared to catch/utilize whatever does fall, in the quantity it falls in. Usually, a desert region doesn't get much, and when it does, it gets it all at once.

I'd guess that the decision might boil down to what you can do, yourself, out on a piece of dirt of your own, for the same $650/mo you pay to live on someone else's piece of dirt. I'd pay a lot, and put up with a lot, to get out from underneath someone else's control. I'd turn that piece of dirt into my own chunk of heaven ... after eating or otherwise evicting the rattlesnakes.

Hope this helps ...
Actually it did help. Immensely! I have actually found a piece of land down by the river with legal access. I am seriously considering it. I am looking at ways to filter water on a large scale. My big berkey is good but not for large scale filtering.
You've given me hope, believe it or not! Thank you, very much!
 

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Discussion Starter #31
BTW, a good portion of our used water goes right back out onto the property ... in the form of greywater. We treat/filter it, and spread it around for various uses. Rarely do we send it to the septic system ... we don't drink it, but it's still good water, with some cycles left in it!

In your case, perhaps this would help improve the area for you. All kinds of designs, and books, to divert greywater to ponds, treat it, and benefit plants/critters.
I could actually have a garden with my greywater!
 

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You could have small water features (ponds) and/or flower beds with the greywater, and certainly other plants could make use of it. Our veggie gardens (raised beds up to this point) don't get greywater, because whatever veggies uptake with their roots goes into us. So for us, fresh water (possibly filtered rainwater) only for the veggies.

On the other hand, maybe it won't take much fresh water to do some low-intensity water veggie gardening, inside or out, given the method you use.

Others directed us towards the Kratky method, which, given your sun/warm weather patterns, perhaps you could do mostly outdoors; Kratky sounds like it could conserve water (avoid evaporation waste). We're still taking first steps into Kratky ... it'll be mostly indoors for us, given the 6" of snow I'm looking at right now.
 

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You could have small water features (ponds) and/or flower beds with the greywater, and certainly other plants could make use of it. Our veggie gardens (raised beds up to this point) don't get greywater, because whatever veggies uptake with their roots goes into us. So for us, fresh water (possibly filtered rainwater) only for the veggies.

On the other hand, maybe it won't take much fresh water to do some low-intensity water veggie gardening, inside or out, given the method you use.

Others directed us towards the Kratky method, which, given your sun/warm weather patterns, perhaps you could do mostly outdoors; Kratky sounds like it could conserve water (avoid evaporation waste). We're still taking first steps into Kratky ... it'll be mostly indoors for us, given the 6" of snow I'm looking at right now.
I'm going now to look up the Kratky method.
SNOW? It's still warm here. We just hit a "cold" front so this week we're in the 50s, but temps are going back up next week.
 

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Actually it did help. Immensely! I have actually found a piece of land down by the river with legal access. I am seriously considering it. I am looking at ways to filter water on a large scale. My big berkey is good but not for large scale filtering.
You've given me hope, believe it or not! Thank you, very much!
Jump on it!! Even if you can't filter it to the point of drinkability, you can use it for everything else and just buy drinking/cooking water
 

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Jump on it!! Even if you can't filter it to the point of drinkability, you can use it for everything else and just buy drinking/cooking water
I need to go look at it. I'm working all day everyday for the next 2 weeks and it's about 45 minutes away. It wont do any good to go after dark and it's almost dark when I get off work at 6. By 6:45 its completely dark. So I'm trying to figure out how I'm gonna get out there. The road does not go down to the property. It has 20' easements down there but I have to find them. So its gonna take time to get there then find it with my gps.
I dont want to buy sight unseen even though everything pretty much looks the same here. Lol
 

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I need to go look at it. I'm working all day everyday for the next 2 weeks and it's about 45 minutes away. It wont do any good to go after dark and it's almost dark when I get off work at 6. By 6:45 its completely dark. So I'm trying to figure out how I'm gonna get out there. The road does not go down to the property. It has 20' easements down there but I have to find them. So its gonna take time to get there then find it with my gps.
I dont want to buy sight unseen even though everything pretty much looks the same here. Lol
Okay, got it. So there is deeded access, but no road?
 

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That could work! You dont' get much snow or ice in the desert, so... I dont see the road getting bad even if it is just a goat trail of sorts that you clear out. Wet season may be problematic sometimes but really, you get so little precipitation it isnt a massive issue. What kind of ground is it? Sand, clay?
 

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That could work! You dont' get much snow or ice in the desert, so... I dont see the road getting bad even if it is just a goat trail of sorts that you clear out. Wet season may be problematic sometimes but really, you get so little precipitation it isnt a massive issue. What kind of ground is it? Sand, clay?
Yes, lol. The ground is sand with clay underneath. Yeah it shouldn't be much of a problem. I'll have to clear it of all pointy, spiky brushy growth first so I dont get a flat, but then it should be fine. It rarely rains, snows, or any other type of precipitation out here.
 

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Yes, lol. The ground is sand with clay underneath. Yeah it shouldn't be much of a problem. I'll have to clear it of all pointy, spiky brushy growth first so I dont get a flat, but then it should be fine. It rarely rains, snows, or any other type of precipitation out here.
I'd be really tempted if you are staying in the area long term. If you can get out of the desert do that instead but if you're really stuck there, that place seems like a good idea. Just verify the water rights first
 
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