Demise of Thousands of Horses

Discussion in 'Countryside Families' started by Zipporah, Jan 4, 2007.

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  1. Zipporah

    Zipporah Well-Known Member

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    Never mind,I don't want to open a can of worms so to speak.
     
  2. momlaffsalot

    momlaffsalot Well-Known Member

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    My friend and I were talking about this the other day...why don't people know just how their medicine is made? I know of a couple of people who do PMU rescue and these horses are so sad. Their babies are taken away from them right away and then THEY become a rescue issue also. The mares have difficulty bonding, it's just very sad and everyone should know the truth.
     

  3. MorrisonCorner

    MorrisonCorner Mansfield, VT for 200 yrs

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    I must be dense... but why is this any sadder than raising anything else for human consumption? Sadder than, say, chickens being raised on a factory farm or hogs on a feed lot?

    Obviously this needed some oversight to keep animals from being raised in unhealthy conditions, but where do you think dog food comes from? Not the corn patch...
     
  4. susieM

    susieM Well-Known Member

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    Remember when a rabbit had to die for a positive pregnancy test?

    Horses and other animals used for slaughter shouldn't be such an emotional matter...meat is meat. Where's the difference between a rabbit or a horse and a cow or a chicken?

    4-H kids learn all about this when they are young...raising their show animals that get sold, usually to restaurants.

    My family likes to eat meat. I used to prefer my meat delivered in anonymous packages at the supermarket, and was shocked when I first went to Britain and saw whole sheep hanging in the butchershop windows....the first time I dared to go in a and order a chicken it came with it's head still on!

    Then I came to France and met up with farmers who showed me how to raise and kill my own table meat...and compared to these farmers, the animals I raise to eat are decently raised and killed.

    A death for the table is but a death. Killing a bigger animal is less death per meal, as a chicken lasts just for just one meal, one family, and a cow would feed many.

    As for the mares, or for any horse, for that matter...what is so wrong with slaughtering them for food? Not everyone can afford to adopt a horse. What happens to older racehorses, for instance? It is much better for them to be eaten and used productively, than to be maybe badly treated or forgotten after adoption...just think of how many puppies and kittens have to already go through that kind of hell.

    Nobody cries for cows and pigs and turkeys...what gives the horse special dispensation?
     
  5. A'sta at Hofstead

    A'sta at Hofstead Turkey Wrangler

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    Cause they are noble and beautiful and are a pleasure beast. That is why.
    [​IMG]
     
  6. Pouncer

    Pouncer Well-Known Member

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    I have been aware of the PMU issue for a long time now. Most of the production has been shut down due to the link between Premarin use and breast cancers. There are still farmers in Canada and the US who have production lines working, but less than half there were just three years ago.

    I hope when the time comes, I can manage the transistion without medications-I do know some women who cannot. Each person is different in that regard, but many tens of thousands of women took this drug without full knowledge of it's manufacturing process or medical risks.
     
  7. Lisa in WA

    Lisa in WA Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have a gorgeous PMU filly and I had a beautiful colt that I sold to a great home in Virginia thru a member of HT. The babies are NOT taken away from the mares right away ( I have pictures of my babies with their mothers in pasture). They werw born in spring, weaned in late summer just like other horses. They have no attachment problems (they actually have incredibly sweet dispostions) and I know of lots of other PMU foals just like them.
    There is a boatload of misinformation out there and the "rescues" are often not that, but a moneymaking enterprise. Check out how much it costs to "adopt" a PMU baby on the site provided. They were running over 2000 dollars and mine were 500 each from the ranch in Alberta.
    Lucy:
    [​IMG]
    Obie:
    [​IMG]
     
  8. painterswife

    painterswife Sock puppet reinstated Supporter

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    I too believe that slaughter is a fact of life. We can not save them all and I would rather see humane slaughter than horses starving.

    I love my horses and one is a rescue.( from starving not PMU)
     
  9. Lisa in WA

    Lisa in WA Well-Known Member Supporter

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  10. DrippingSprings

    DrippingSprings In Remembrance

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    WOW those are some nice horses. Oh and Im sorry I snapped at you. I didnt realize you were the head knocker over there. i was just thinking you were one of the nosey ones butting in....
     
  11. DrippingSprings

    DrippingSprings In Remembrance

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    So youve never seen the chivalry of a rooster with his hen? I have sat untold tens of hundreds of hours with my fowl and the roosters will often find food and cluck and offer it to his mate. In a pen some times they will starve themselves to see that the hens or hens get feed. I ahve also seen them go to a certain death protecting their hen from preds and dogs cats and even attack a human

    all noble traits.

    horses I love but outside of making pasture apples they are fun to ride and thats about it
     
  12. rileyjo

    rileyjo Well-Known Member

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    I've bought a few PMU foals and have been very happy with how they turned out.

    A local farmer travels to the auctions out west, out bids the meat men and trucks these foals back into Ontario. He runs it as a business and makes a profit. They'd be slaughtered otherwise.

    The foals are a waste by product of the conjugated estrogen business. However, some
    of the owners of the "mare farms" are realizing that there is a market for sport horses and are spending a few bucks to get a quality stallion to cover the mares. Not the way I"d want to spend my life if I was horse and I won't be putting any diluter horse wee-wee into my body not matter how annoying menopause might be.
     
  13. Zipporah

    Zipporah Well-Known Member

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    I don't have a problem with animals being used for food or medicine.I have a problem with the care of the animal being used.I personally would not knowingly eat a horse it would be like eating a dog for me. I love horses. That said I am sure there are places that care for the animals well,but the article talked about ones that are full of worms and sick.I'd not like my medicine coming from a wormy sick animal that is tied up all day.I do believe some of the adoption agencies may take advantage of those looking to help.It is sad.Also I'd like to know where my medicine comes form before I take it. I have been on more hormones that I care to list and am grossed out to find the source after the fact.
    Lisa your horse are lovely. Looks like they have a good little care taker helping them out.
     
  14. momlaffsalot

    momlaffsalot Well-Known Member

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    Ah, but their slaughter is NOT humane at all. For such kind animals, it's particularly barbaric, as I believe all of our mass slaughter is.
     
  15. katlupe

    katlupe Off-The-Grid Homesteader Supporter

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    Lisa, they are just beautiful!!!!!

    katlupe
     
  16. birdie_poo

    birdie_poo Well-Known Member

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    Lisa,

    Thank you for providing more accurate information. While I have nkow about these animals I also know that animals kept n poor conditions do not give 'good products' in return. The misinformation about these horses and the alleged abuse of meat animals and egg chickens is just propaganda from the animla right wing.

    Anyone who knows anything about animals know they wont produce the needed by product in poor conditions.

    While I think if you need meds forcertain conditions and object to the way it's obtained, seek other sources for the meds. And while I'm on a little rant, I 1000000000% believe that all testing of any kind should be done on death row inmates and not on animals.
     
  17. Spinner

    Spinner Well-Known Member

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    If they were truly rescues the rescuers should be happy to place them in a good home at no charge. I know rescues need money to keep working, but why can't they work on donations like many others do instead of charging big bucks for the animals they "rescue".

    Rescue horses used to be adopted for $25. The price was then raised to $75. Then they started charging $100. Now I'm hearing of charges up in the hundreds or thousands of dollars. Sounds like somebody somewhere is making a lot of money off these horses. Sometimes I wonder if it's not just a breeding program where the breeders have found a way to sell their horses for more than they normally could.

    Around here you can buy a darn good horse for a few hundred. But these “rescuers” are selling untrained horses for double or triple what a good trained horse sells for. They should be ashamed of themselves.
     
  18. Lisa in WA

    Lisa in WA Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I do wish slaughter (and the transportation of animals for slaughter) were more humane, but I think it is preferable to a slow death by neglect and starvation. And there are a lot of neglected horses out there.
    I scanned the article quickly before going out to unload hay but did they even go to a PMU farm to look at the horses and check them for worms? Did they just take the animal rights groups word for it?
    Here is Obie with his mama along at the ranch in Alberta. He shows no evidence of worms nor do the mares. No pot bellies, the coats are fairly shiny. This ranch does make a good effort to breed for foals that will have a future as sport horses. Obie's father is the Thoroughbred stallion and Canadian Derby winner, "Sounds Fabulous". Thanks for the compliments on my babies!

    [​IMG]
     
  19. Mutti

    Mutti Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm wondering if the National Guard is air dropping hay to the wild horse herds who won't be able to find grass or water....dee
     
  20. Zipporah

    Zipporah Well-Known Member

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    Surely you are kidding.I can NOT imagine anyone wanting to use humans no matter how vile you may view them as for testing. :nono:
     
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