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Also here’s a bull calf we had and he’s now a new herd sire and I’ll put photos of him aswell his dam is a brangus and he’s brangus cross he has mostly angus in his blood through this is the only photo of him as a baby he turned really black as he matured he was stocky and now he grew up and became our brangus cattle herd sire.(btw the white was milk he would not stop getting on momma)
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I dont think keeping it would be smart, would cause more neighbor problems than it's worth.
I mean I would fight for my right they wanted to just let their cattle go on their land and destroy their property I would take the calf and make a good profit off of it or at least raise it to a year and then go to auction and get a got $1000 off it
 

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Sorry about the photo I was trying to explain to the person if they want stocky calves to look more for how that bull calf looked but not perfect like him we just got lucky
 

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The obvious has already been covered. A written contract protects both parties.
At the least, the cost of your crops, property damage and lost calf paid for your education.
A degree in Trust from the University of Gullible isn't worth much these days.

If it were me? I'd have the attorney send the letter. I'd also make sure folks were aware of how these neighbors operate.
My question to the neighbors would have been this- If the deal was that I would only get a calf if it was a heifer, then what was my compensation supposed to be otherwise?
I like to assume people aren't really as bad as the original story and the details will eventually confirm that. If I had an entire herd of livestock get out and do as you say they did to your property, then agree to breed them, I would have a sense of obligation. So, either there are missing pieces to the story or they are total knotheads. That is why I would have the attorney send the letter, if nothing else but a bluff.
 

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I would be torn between going after the owners of the cows for room and board or just writing it off as a lesson learned. If the calf is a mix with questionable lines it would take more time and money to raise it to butchering size than it might be worth. I hope the people have moved away far enough that their cows never reach your property again.
 

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My response would be based on the owner's response. I can overlook about anything, but if my good will is returned with "I don't owe you a penny", well then...
Personally, I would look forward to their cows wandering by again, as the outcome would be much different than the first time.
 

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In all honesty, it will probably cost you more than $170 to fight it and I would just write it off to experience and recognize that you've learnt a lesson. I don't do other farmers stock on my land, I don't do other farmers cows or heifers on my land going to my very expensive bull, I just don't do dick heads using my land and my bull and expecting to get away with it. I can deal with an "accident" because animals are animals but that's the extent of it. The last neighbour who prevailed on my good will got a phone call from me after the third time his cow was on my property, telling him he could pick his cow up from the council pound. It cost him over $1,000 in trucking and grazing, more than the cow was worth at that time. His cow never appeared back on my property. Suck it back this time but make it known that it won't happen again! I like to think that most of us have good neighbours but unfortunately it doesn't always work that way.

Cheers,
Ronnie
 

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I'd just cross them off my list and remember that no good deed goes unpunished. Tell people you care about to watch out for them. But since you are all neighbors it's not worth it to cultivate enemies.

If their critters come on your land again it's probably good to put them In your freezer right away and not know anything about it. At least one of them.
 

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Animals get out it happens, but I would not have taken care of them for months not even days. I would put it up to lesson learned.

Here in Iowa if cattle are wondering around you are not allowed to shoot them or keep them. You call the sheriffs office and they will send someone out to collect the wayward animals.

We are the the only property around that is fully fenced with a front gate. I know the neighbors think we are strange but I don't to worry about other peoples dogs killing my chickens or their cattle eating my trees (have enough problems with my own critters).
 

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I wouldn't go to war with a neighbor over $170. But learn from it. If their cattle are loose, leave them loose and outside your fence. If they are out for too long, call animal control.

I believe in helping my neighbors, but not past the point where the neighbors are taking advantage.
 

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I would be frustrated as heck and it would bother me for a long time, but it ends up water under the bridge and you will stick more than $170 into getting a settlement which they will ignore and not pay anyhow.

if you were supposed to get 1/2 the crop of calves, you did have kind of a good deal going there, maybe there was a reason it was such a good deal......

a learning experience, now you know who not to do business with.

paul
 

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I have a close friend who is a lawyer and they have offered to sign some papers to bring against them. But I need to know how much to charge them at the end of the day for a highland bull grand champion covering two heifers, daily care for two months, destroying 5 fruit trees, and eating the canes off of a few rows of the vineyard. If you have read to here thanks so much! Have a great day!
It seems to me that everything should have been in writing from the start. Never go with verbal agreements with neighbors. Never do verbal agreements with people who let their livestock wonder. At this point, it doesn't really matter what you ask for, its your word against theirs. Just my opinion.
You have no recourse. Don’t do favors without paperwork.
I like the sounds of what hiddensprings and Alice In TX/MO had to say. If it ain't in your fist, it don't exist. It's not what anyone said, it's what you can prove when it goes to court. If your lawyer friend believes that he has a case that won't break your bank to make in court see if they will cave to the threat of legal action. Insemination fees and pasturage/damage charges as long as they are not exorbitant should pass under a judge's nose without much trouble.

Just be reasonable. Check with your county extension office for local ideas on fees.

Something that seems to be being overlooked here is the you are squabbling over being compensated for the services of a bull that is not yours, shouldn't you rather be currying favor with the bull owner so's not to fall out of his good graces?

Don't forget the Aesop's fable about the dog and the bone.
 
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