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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
this might not be the correct forum to talk about this, but I figure maybe someone here will be able to help me out. around the fall of last year, a family friend of ours who owns highland cattle and has a grand champion bull brought his bull out to our farm to breed our small herd. About a month went by with no problem, then on New Years, my older brother finds some cows on the side of the rd. Long story short the cows keep coming around for days with neighbors trying to catch them when they happen to wander into our farm. we close the gate and put up postings everywhere trying to find the owner. Ultimately we get a note on our door from the owners saying they want their cows back. I give them a call and two days later they come to get them. we end up having a discussion and they tell me they would like to breed their cows to the bull. I call up the owner he says tell me what the deal they offer you is and they need to send me medical records. The verbal agreement was I would get the firstborn calf unless it was a bull and the second was a heifer (as I wanted a heifer and they wanted a bull). the owner of the bull also was aware of the deal and permitted it as he is a close family friend and understood I was getting a good deal. the cows stay on our property for a little over two months. well at the end of September I text the neighbor and say how are the cows doing (they moved out from the city and don't know much about ranching or farming) they tell me neither are pregnant, I take their word for it and move on. then this past week I found a CG posting for one of their cows saying it calved in October. I send them an email and they say it's their cow, but then go onto say our deal was I would only get a calf if it was a heifer (their other cow never calved). they are a bit notorious throughout the other neighbors, for example, their cows get out frequently and destroy people crops but so far everyone has been somewhat understanding, I put out a good word for them and all. But I think I have reached the end of my rope with them, the blatant lying is too much. But since I always try to see the best in people I went ahead and told them if they pay me $170 I will get out of their hair ($170 for: grand champion sire, daily feeding, over two months of care, the fruit trees they destroyed, the crops they destroyed, and everything else we put in). They come back to me saying they owe me nothing and all that stuff. THIS IS WHERE I NEED YOUR HELP. How much do I come back to them with, since $170 seems like its letting them off to easy. I have a close friend who is a lawyer and they have offered to sign some papers to bring against them. But I need to know how much to charge them at the end of the day for a highland bull grand champion covering two heifers, daily care for two months, destroying 5 fruit trees, and eating the canes off of a few rows of the vineyard. If you have read to here thanks so much! Have a great day!
 

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It seems to me that everything should have been in writing from the start. Never go with verbal agreements with neighbors. Never do verbal agreements with people who let their livestock wonder. At this point, it doesn't really matter what you ask for, its your word against theirs. Just my opinion.
 

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Ik I’m really bland about this but in all honesty our neighbors 38 head of cattle broke into our property about a year ago and we still have them on the property with our other cattle we ain’t complaining though becuase they give us the money from our calves so it’s a win win situation for us they get took care of like all our cattle and animals do and they give us money by producing for us so in all honesty I get where your coming from but I think it’s somewhat not a big deal but it could just be me idk I get it you took care of them for 2 months , ate your garden but that grows back and I mean their cattle they eat anything that they can reach so if it happens again put a fence over your crops so they can’t get them and make it sturdy where they can’t bust in and get better fencing if they keep busting into your property and if it’s not a fencing problem put up a sign that says any cattle I do not own that trespass will be shot :)
 

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What state are you in? In some states you are responsible for fencing cattle out and they would not be responsible for damages to your property.

Otherwise, you need to make an inventory of damaged property and hours spent caring for their cattle. Without an inventory you have no idea how much they really cost you.

Consider this a lesson learned, no more cow sitting without a price list and signed contract.
 

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What state are you in? In some states you are responsible for fencing cattle out and they would not be responsible for damages to your property.

Otherwise, you need to make an inventory of damaged property and hours spent caring for their cattle. Without an inventory you have no idea how much they really cost you.

Consider this a lesson learned, no more cow sitting without a price list and signed contract.
Strongly agreed we had someone’s buck sneak into our doe pasture with our fresh girls while we were all gone and he bred them and the baby’s were nice but very low quality so we sent them to slaughter we didn’t even give em a chance it was sad but I’m not gonna sell someone’s babies who were an accident
 

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Unless the neighbors cows were also Highland cattle, I doubt the scrub calves would be worth all that much. Though I can see it's more a matter of principle. These people appear to take advantage of other folk and don't seem like that have much honor. I would consider it a lesson learned and to get money up front or no cigar.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
What state are you in? In some states you are responsible for fencing cattle out and they would not be responsible for damages to your property.

Otherwise, you need to make an inventory of damaged property and hours spent caring for their cattle. Without an inventory you have no idea how much they really cost you.

Consider this a lesson learned, no more cow sitting without a price list and signed contract.
we are in Oregon. I did not think of this as an option. our whole property is fenced as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Ik I’m really bland about this but in all honesty our neighbors 38 head of cattle broke into our property about a year ago and we still have them on the property with our other cattle we ain’t complaining though becuase they give us the money from our calves so it’s a win win situation for us they get took care of like all our cattle and animals do and they give us money by producing for us so in all honesty I get where your coming from but I think it’s somewhat not a big deal but it could just be me idk I get it you took care of them for 2 months , ate your garden but that grows back and I mean their cattle they eat anything that they can reach so if it happens again put a fence over your crops so they can’t get them and make it sturdy where they can’t bust in and get better fencing if they keep busting into your property and if it’s not a fencing problem put up a sign that says any cattle I do not own that trespass will be shot :)
we do have fence around our whole property, and in some areas do have no trespassing. I ended up after talking to another annoyed/angry neighbor whos garden had been destroyed and wanted to shoot their cows, I sent them a text and told them they needed to put up fence regardless of the laws or else their cows will be shot.
 

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we do have fence around our whole property, and in some areas do have no trespassing. I ended up after talking to another annoyed/angry neighbor whos garden had been destroyed and wanted to shoot their cows, I sent them a text and told them they needed to put up fence regardless of the laws or else their cows will be shot.
My dad would have shot those cattle the second he layed his eyes on them I’m sorry but He don’t like other people not keeping their animals in their own area
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Hello,
this might not be the correct forum to talk about this, but I figure maybe someone here will be able to help me out. around the fall of last year, a family friend of ours who owns highland cattle and has a grand champion bull brought his bull out to our farm to breed our small herd. About a month went by with no problem, then on New Years, my older brother finds some cows on the side of the rd. Long story short the cows keep coming around for days with neighbors trying to catch them when they happen to wander into our farm. we close the gate and put up postings everywhere trying to find the owner. Ultimately we get a note on our door from the owners saying they want their cows back. I give them a call and two days later they come to get them. we end up having a discussion and they tell me they would like to breed their cows to the bull. I call up the owner he says tell me what the deal they offer you is and they need to send me medical records. The verbal agreement was I would get the firstborn calf unless it was a bull and the second was a heifer (as I wanted a heifer and they wanted a bull). the owner of the bull also was aware of the deal and permitted it as he is a close family friend and understood I was getting a good deal. the cows stay on our property for a little over two months. well at the end of September I text the neighbor and say how are the cows doing (they moved out from the city and don't know much about ranching or farming) they tell me neither are pregnant, I take their word for it and move on. then this past week I found a CG posting for one of their cows saying it calved in October. I send them an email and they say it's their cow, but then go onto say our deal was I would only get a calf if it was a heifer (their other cow never calved). they are a bit notorious throughout the other neighbors, for example, their cows get out frequently and destroy people crops but so far everyone has been somewhat understanding, I put out a good word for them and all. But I think I have reached the end of my rope with them, the blatant lying is too much. But since I always try to see the best in people I went ahead and told them if they pay me $170 I will get out of their hair ($170 for: grand champion sire, daily feeding, over two months of care, the fruit trees they destroyed, the crops they destroyed, and everything else we put in). They come back to me saying they owe me nothing and all that stuff. THIS IS WHERE I NEED YOUR HELP. How much do I come back to them with, since $170 seems like its letting them off to easy. I have a close friend who is a lawyer and they have offered to sign some papers to bring against them. But I need to know how much to charge them at the end of the day for a highland bull grand champion covering two heifers, daily care for two months, destroying 5 fruit trees, and eating the canes off of a few rows of the vineyard. If you have read to here thanks so much! Have a great day!
OK, so here is the follow up. they replied to an earlier email, and said they don't owe me a dime end of discussion. I am debating between getting the owner of the bull (also a Lawyer) involved, Or letting it go and mark it down as lesson learned. I finally saw the calf when driving by, looks like it has good bone structure so if I end up pushing to take the calf, I could probably raise it up and sell it off in shares.
 

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OK, so here is the follow up. they replied to an earlier email, and said they don't owe me a dime end of discussion. I am debating between getting the owner of the bull (also a Lawyer) involved, Or letting it go and mark it down as lesson learned. I finally saw the calf when driving by, looks like it has good bone structure so if I end up pushing to take the calf, I could probably raise it up and sell it off in shares.
I mean if the calf has good bone structure keep it then produce off it and sell those babies to produce quality cattle off that cow or bull
 

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OK, so here is the follow up. they replied to an earlier email, and said they don't owe me a dime end of discussion. I am debating between getting the owner of the bull (also a Lawyer) involved, Or letting it go and mark it down as lesson learned. I finally saw the calf when driving by, looks like it has good bone structure so if I end up pushing to take the calf, I could probably raise it up and sell it off in shares.
If their cattle are out all the time why not just take the calf next time they get out?
 

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OK, so here is the follow up. they replied to an earlier email, and said they don't owe me a dime end of discussion. I am debating between getting the owner of the bull (also a Lawyer) involved, Or letting it go and mark it down as lesson learned. I finally saw the calf when driving by, looks like it has good bone structure so if I end up pushing to take the calf, I could probably raise it up and sell it off in shares.
That’s what we did with this cow she was one who came from one of my neighbors she was taking her to auction so I bought her for $100 and then she produced me a great looking heifer for her first calf but we usually throw around great stocky cattle anyways.
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If their cattle are out all the time why not just take the calf next time they get out?
I agree but one thing I disagree that @Cahama06 said was she would sell the stocky calf in my opinion if it’s a heifer calf use her to produce you with stocky calves in the future and if it’s a bull calf then wait till breeding age and use him instead of using you neighbors grand champion bull to your heifers if your looking for specific looking cattle you go more towards for bull calves go for nice bone structure , stocky ,and good lines.
For a heifer calf you want good bone structure , stocky but still feminine and also good lines they do not have to be the best but lines that will produce calves that will make you a good bit of cash if you sell your cattle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I agree but one thing I disagree that @Cahama06 said was she would sell the stocky calf in my opinion if it’s a heifer calf use her to produce you with stocky calves in the future and if it’s a bull calf then wait till breeding age and use him instead of using you neighbors grand champion bull to your heifers if your looking for specific looking cattle you go more towards for bull calves go for nice bone structure , stocky ,and good lines.
For a heifer calf you want good bone structure , stocky but still feminine and also good lines they do not have to be the best but lines that will produce calves that will make you a good bit of cash if you sell your cattle.
so for the confusion. the bull calf I was talking about it the outcome of the grand champion bull and the neighbors calf. The agreement we had meant I would get the first born calf (no second calf was born) but they are refusing to give me the bull calf. Our operation is not large enough at the time to keep bulls on sight and this bull calf is a mix breed so he is not worth much to me, other than his market value as a beef steer/bull. he is still young enough I would not have a problem banding him.
 

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I agree but one thing I disagree that @Cahama06 said was she would sell the stocky calf in my opinion if it’s a heifer calf use her to produce you with stocky calves in the future and if it’s a bull calf then wait till breeding age and use him instead of using you neighbors grand champion bull to your heifers if your looking for specific looking cattle you go more towards for bull calves go for nice bone structure , stocky ,and good lines.
For a heifer calf you want good bone structure , stocky but still feminine and also good lines they do not have to be the best but lines that will produce calves that will make you a good bit of cash if you sell your cattle.
I dont think keeping it would be smart, would cause more neighbor problems than it's worth.
 
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