dead chickens need a predator call

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by MELOC, Jun 12, 2006.

  1. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    :flame:

    today, in broad daylight, presumably a fox or a family of foxes devestated my sisters silkies. she leaves them out from about 2-3pm until dusk when she pens them in. i was outside a good bit cutting wood and gardening and i heard nothing. when she left them out, one fought with another and she picked it up for a "timeout". when she did, it make a loud fuss and i guess that called in the predators. i cannot believe i never heard anything. she lost at least 4 silkies.

    i need to hunt these darn critters. a mile away, a good deal of land was cleared for development and i suppose we are still getting animals that are forced out of their territory.

    i need an animal in distress call or a link to a recording of a rabbit in distress so i can hunt them down. any fox bold enough to attack in braod daylight is a danger to small kids in the neighborhood in addition to the livestock. pa game regulations be damned, i am killin' every one of them i see.
     
  2. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    rabbit in distress call...ebay...$12 delivered.
     

  3. Patty0315

    Patty0315 Well-Known Member

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    A fox is not going to bother kids unless rabid. It could also be a coon. Any "parts "of the chickens left ? With silkies being small it could also be a large Tom or a dog. We have a family of Foxes we have been seeing during the day and up close, they are hunting the escaped bunnies.
     
  4. seedspreader

    seedspreader AFKA ZealYouthGuy

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    This is the second "Fox in the Daylight" thread... something with the moon or something???
     
  5. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    i strongly feel my sister's "chicken timeout" had much to do with what happened today. i did see her with him and he was raising a fuss big time.

    there are over-grown fencerows and creek banks in all directions. there are also chicken feathers going in all directions...towards the creek and towards two seperate fence rows. i found feathers over 100 yards away. she lost all but one out of 8 or 9 chickens today, so far. we have found no other survivors.

    i do not think a coon could or would have done this in that way. i think several foxes responded to the rooster's distress and took their dinners home the way they came. i am fairly certain multiple foxes are denned up very near to my home. i have found about 4 dens on our property and have no idea what is in the field below us.

    the really strange thing is that the barn is only about 10 yards away from a busy road. these foxes are about as tame as wild foxes can be, i guess. there were many folks around the neighborhood during the time of the attacks. it happened so fast and no one heard anything. it probably happened during the 10 minutes i was using the chainsaw or when i ate a late lunch afterwards.

    there have been many environmental changes in the region in the past few years. coyotes now run the tops of the ridges. multiple clear-cuts on the state land have created more habitat for the coyotes forcing the foxes lower to my elevation. development a mile away has just recently cleared one of the last remaining habitats between the town and my home. i think all of these factors have contributed to the fox population explosion my neighbors and i have seen. they are sometimes seen in the middle of the day and even in peoples driveways.

    you don't mind losing a chicken here and there, as it was in the past. this was unreal. i have another neighbor who recently lost all of her chickens at once. i have seen hawks fly away with chickens twice in years past. i have seen whole chickens with their heads gone due to rats and weasels. i know coons have taken a few. most of the mammal attacks are at night. it is even more unlikely to have a coon kill chickens in the daytime than foxes.

    i have seen young raccoons clipping acorns or something in the tree tops in the middle of the day. that was new to me. several years ago i was walking along the property line with the state forest and saw the young coons in the tree tops clipping those limbs. that was something i have never seen before or have ever heard of. i thought they were totally nocturnal.

    i am not a newbie with critters like these. my dad used to have about 8 coons dogs at once. he owned one of about every breed at one time or another. living on this 30 acre plot all my life, i have seen foxes every year all my life. i have never seen them in mid-day before. it was always at dusk or early in the morning. the boost in the coyote population and the nearby development are the two things that must be a factor in this.

    if i had not had a bad experience with my dog biting a person, i would get a livestock dog and let it run. i just feel i cannot do that now. i would feel horrible if someones child got hurt and i would probably go to war with a neighbor if they shot a dog i owned.

    so...i will sit in the woods on one of the old fencerows with my rabbit in distress call and try to lower the fox population a bit. i thin kthat is all i can do. i am really not into trapping as i think it is cruel. i do not judge others who do it, it is just not for me.
     
  6. MaineFarmMom

    MaineFarmMom Columnist, Feature Writer

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    Kits have grown and are leaving the den to learn to hunt on their own. The fox in the other thread was small so most likely it's a youngster out on its own now.

    Feathers in many directions sounds like a vixen with her litter out on an easy hunting lesson.

    Owls do this too. I blamed the coons for this every time until I saw the great horned owl sitting on the fence post by the hen house door one night. That was the end of roosters roosting on the roof at night.

    Fox are smart. They wait until my dogs aren't around to come through. One dog can't be every where at once so a dog wouldn't guarantee the fox don't return anyway.