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Pure mischief
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Hi everyone

I have a dangerous ewe who has really gotten obnoxious and dangerous. She's a small girl - thank goodness - but the head butting is out of control. She was a bummer and has absolutely no fear of people (unlike her flock mates). She's worse than any ram I've had.

Any thoughts on gentling her a bit. She was really gentle and just in the last few months (since she moved here) she's gotten brutal. The people who had her before me transported her here and felt that was a tipping point for her. She head butted an obnoxious person during one of their stops and that was it, she realized she had some power.

I'd love suggestions that don't include the butcher. I suggested it and ds burst into tears - she's his ewe.
 

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Scotties rule!
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No real suggestons on how to gentle her. If you are keeping her put a collar and bell on her. At least you'll be able to hear her coming.

Kathie
 

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A good stockdog would take care of that problem and put her in her place.
One thing I have never tried with sheep, but used to work with nasty geese was to catch them every time they came after me. I'd hang on to them for long enough so they really wanted to escape, after a while they associated me with being caught, so they kept their distance. In the sheep's case, you could tie her up for a bit. Other than that, why keep a nasty sheep, 86 her.
 

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Just thinking more on this subject, the other day a friend of mine told me about a ram that was charging his dog. I was helping him with some sorting one day with my dog , the ram was in the group we were sorting. He did fine until he was just one of the last few, then he decided to start charging my dog. She wasn't going to have any of that and proceeded to give him a little teeth on his nose. He straightened right up. Then next time she went to move him, I could see him think about it, I had her lie down to give him time to consider his next move, he calmly turned and walked away.
If you do decide to catch her, you might trim her hooves, worm her vaccinate, whatever, but make it involved and so it takes a while, something she won't soon want to do again.
 

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water and vineager mix will do wonders. Wife did put in a spray bottle and anytime the ram came near her or even looked at her she blasted him in the face. He stopped his behavior toward her within a week. :)
She now trains the new stock the same way.
 

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It's time to teach her that you are the alpha animal on your farm. Get her in a small pen, face up and wait for her to challenge you. When she makes her move grab her and take her to the ground then sit/kneel on her shoulder holding her head to the ground and let her fight until she gives up. Don't let go until she does submit. Get yourself a shepherd's crook or a good cane and carry it with you anytime you have to get in the pen with any of your sheep. If she comes at you, tap her across the knees with it. If necessary, repeat the pen experience and she will respect you in time.

A couple of don'ts.
Don't let anyone else go in with her unless you are with them.
Don't ever think she is cured, if you let your guard down, that's when she try you.

If you cannot get her to accept you as the boss, then it's time for her to go on down the road. Life's too short to spend it on a dangerous animal.
 

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Little Johnny came in from the barn one evening in a panic.

"Mom, something's happened to Lulu! She's missing!"

"Don't worry, honey, Lulu's only gone to camp," replied Little Johnny's mother as she stirred a pot of Lulu Stew...
 

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Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....?
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Your son will cry more when she butts him and really hurts him. Trade her for a new one
 

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FourCountryGals.com
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We had what we thought was a "mean ewe"... when we were getting our little flock sheared, we discovered she wasn't really "Chiquita". She was actually "Bruce".

We had gotten her as a bummer, and are entirely sure "she" was never banded. However, she did grow horns.

Since we're kind of newcomers to sheep, we just put off the butting as the result of having spoiled her as a baby... yeah right!

Our solution: trade her to the shearer for the cost of shearing. Boy is our flock ever happy.
 

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Namaste
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flannelberry said:
Hi everyone

I have a dangerous ewe who has really gotten obnoxious and dangerous. She's a small girl - thank goodness - but the head butting is out of control. She was a bummer and has absolutely no fear of people (unlike her flock mates). She's worse than any ram I've had.

QUOTE]

How old is the "ewe". Perhaps as was already suggested it's a matter of non-descended testicles and she is really a ram. How long have you had her? What is her condition - perhaps she is doing poorly and very hungry so seems aggressive? What happens if you hold on to her when she is close and give her scratches & rubs? Does she settle? How old is your son, is he old enough to be part of the decision process? Will the sellers taker her back or can you find her a new home, if you feel you cannot work with her. I have had sheep only a few years and my girls will charge up to me but only to be the first for attention :) ; our Jacob 4 horned ram was shown as a youngster - he too will come right up for attention which might put someone off but he wants some loving and then goes off to eat. Perhaps if you hung out in the field with them and got familiar with her behavior, she just might need some attention to feel at home or to watch how you interact with the other sheep; new sheep to my flock definitely watch how the others come up and receive attention before they decide if I'm okay. If you would be breeding her this fall maybe she'll calm down when she lambs, most especially if you are there to "help". I'm sorry to not be doing much more than ask you questions...maybe tho they'll spur some idea. Aggressiveness and ewe are almost oxymoronic in my limited experience.
 

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Sounds like it is her way of getting attention OR a hormone imbalance.
I would try and work with her keeping her head up and rubbing under her chest. If she uses her head abrubtly say "no". This has worked on the occasional ram lamb here. She is probably seeking attention but in a negative way (unknowingly).
I mention the hormones because I have had a Lincoln ewe that uses her head when I try and have contact with her. The kids named her Gigi the dork.
During her first year the ram mounted her and I didn't want her bred that young. The vet gave me a hormone shot to offset the possible joining. For a long time afterwards she had tendencies of an aggressive ram. Since then (7 years), she is not the most pleasant ewe to be around but is fine if I leave her alone. Just thought I'd mention this too.
I would really see if you can get through to her with the positive reinforced behavior. The bottle lambs tend to be very spoiled (I have a few) and it is nobody's fault but my own:)
 

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Get rid of her or the child or some one else will pay the price.

She could hit the boy in the head and kill him.

Get rid of the dangerous animal she is not worth keeping.

bumpus
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I apologize, I forgot to mention that you, the adult should work with her if you want to give her a chance.
I think the suggestion to get a different ewe (lamb), for him is a super idea !!
 

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Pure mischief
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wendle said:
A good stockdog would take care of that problem and put her in her place.
I do have to say - our Pyr has intervened a few times and not put her in her place but has intercepted a few butts. We're working on getting an ES but won't have one in soon enough time to help with the immediate.

She's definitely an ewe - no question there. She's also very healthy - although does need a hoof trim (I liked the suggestion about that).

I do see the suggestion about him crying more if she hits him and it's concern. However, he's on a farm and any of them could hit him really; we have horses as well. He's not around the sheep without us - whether or not she was here that would be the same while he's a little guy. Although Kesoaps did make me lol.

She is trying to assert her dominance. We've found that the behaviours have lessened when we respond appropriately (ie not being dominated). We do the same thing her herd sisters do when she has her moments (and they are fleeting) of acting up. Stomp feet, snort etc. Dh and I are both comfortable doing this with her (it's a great opportunity to practice our martial arts skills if nothing else). I hope this doesn't sound horrible but a crescent kick to her as she's charged has reduced the charging to nearly nil so far. It's not hard enough to do her any damage but feels like it's asserting dominance and throwing her off her stride, literally.

Liese - I so appreciate the spirit you offered your suggestions in. Unfortunately, it's just plain obnoxiousness (or maybe hormones). She is small and won't ever be bred. ITA that aggressiveness and ewes is nearly oxymoronic -but they only ones I have heard of were bummers. That's her.

I actually don't agree that it's a seeking for attention - it's gotten worse with attention, although better with the arrival of our new ewes. I do think I should consult the vet in case there's a hormonal imbalance -thanks for that. I'd think about it in a dog but I just didn't with her. She is like you describe - it's usually when you want something from her that she gets like that. She'll come over to get something to eat or a scratch (although she's less happy when getting scratched) but when you try to get her out of the hay shed etc. then she gets obnoxious. Sorry, I shouldn't have made it sound like she was walking around causing trouble - it's just when she's having a tantrum!

I think we'll try the vinegar and water spray - thanks for that. I know she'll hate it.

The people we bought her from (who drove her 12 hours to get here) just saw her and were so sorry her personality had changed. They really blamed the trip coming here (and there's no question that she's different) and themselves. I woudln't ask them to take her back, nor do I blame them. They have to be the most honourable and ethical animal people I've ever met. I will consult with them when they're back from holidays.

Many thanks to all of you. Rest assured ds is never unsupervised around her - he's a smart kid and understands the danger with the stock in general and her specifically. He was with me when she hit my leg and has seen the bruising and really gets it. She hasn't hit me since -but it's not that she hasn't tried. We thought of a shock collar after she's shorn as an option too.

Anyway, I'm going to consult the breeder and we will consider turning her into stew. I wouldn't rehome her - it just seems like we'd be passing our problem on to someone else.

Many thanks again.
 

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Although Kesoaps did make me lol.
Well, then, my job is done :p


BTW...a good stock dog isn't the same as an LGD. Wendle means a border collie or aussie (no, Wendle means a BC...) to take her on big time. My neighbors had a bottle lamb that got that way; she was a ewe as well. Good luck, what ever you decide!
 

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I had a goat one time like that all the time want to charge and hit someone.

The goat hit one of my best goats in the side of the head and caused brain damage to the other goat so I had to shot the brain damaged goat and kill it.

That mean goat went bye bye.

Animals that ram all of the time are a danger and will catch you off guard one time and will hurt someone.

They ram other does and kill the young unborn kids inside.

I know a man who had a cow that would all the time ram other cattle and it killed one of his other cows. The he wizened up and got rid of the dangerous cow which could have killed someone, but it cost him a lot of money.

This is the same as a wild animal and could even get loose and go to a neighbors house and hurt someone even a neighbors child, and now you are sued and live with the guilt the rest of your life for no taking action it the beginning and getting rid of the danger.

They are a danger waiting to happen and smart farmers know that it's time to get rid of the animal before someone is killed or hurt.


Some people have to learn the hard way, at others expence.
If they don't they have no one to blame but themselves.


bumpus
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