danger from rams

Discussion in 'Sheep' started by doodles, Apr 2, 2005.

  1. doodles

    doodles Well-Known Member

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    I had come home from work and went in to take a bath. I was exhausted and aching. The kids were out in the yard playing-it was our 1st day without rain in a week. They ran in the house to tell me that Fabio (our Kanison) was out of his pen. I got out of the tub and put on my P.J.'s . I thought that I would just get a bucket of feed and lead him back to his pen.
    I walked out to the shed and Fabio came rushing down the hill. I offered him the feed in a scoop but he was crazy. He began ramming me I dropped the feed and he didn't even stop or notice. I was lucky enough to grab a shovel and fight my way back to the house. Ken is out of town with my oldest daughter so I was home alone with my little ones. I ran to the truck and drove down to my friends house. He brought over a gun. We drove up in the truck and Fabio literally challenged the truck. They shot him in the chest with a rifle but he ran up the hill. The guy thought that he would be dazed enough to just walk up and shoot him again. Fabio saw him get out of the back of the truck and charged him. He jumped into a pen and climbed to the top of the fence. Fabio continued to circle the pen and try to attack the man. He finally was able to shoot him again and kill him.
    I knew that this ram was aggressive but never thought that he would be this crazy . My gosh he was not even in rut!
    I will never keep a ram that shows aggression again -no matter how well bred he is. This could have cost me my life or one of my children. I am exhausted and emotionally drained. We are so fortunate that we were not hurt. I always go out alone in the middle of the night. If the girls had not noticed that he was out I would have been out there at 3 am totally unaware. With Ken out of town and the kids asleep I shudder to think what might have been the outcome.
    When he saw me walk out he just came at a dead run to attack me. At first I thought that he was looking for feed-until he hit me. I was so lucky to be able to get a shovel to beat him back long enough to back into the house.
    I have never had any other ram be so brutal.
    I think that we sometimes get too familiar and forget how dangerous these animals can be...
    Angie
     
  2. Cat

    Cat Well-Known Member

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    Sorry to hear about your ram, Angie. It's awful like you say that sometimes we forget that these things don't think like we do. My Dad's been gotten good a few times by a past ram of ours, as have I. In fact, there were many times when I'm sure I'd have won the prize on AFV after the ram had butted me and I went off like a wild-woman throwing stuff at him, trying to kick him while my sandal goes flying 20 feet from me. I don't run from him, I go on the offensive and try to put the fear of God in him which does work for awhile. It's both dangerous and comical. (Yeah, I am horrible about walking out in the pasture in sandals...) I used to tell my Dad that he needs to *know* that every time he goes out with the sheep that this ram was *going* to get him. It just isn't safe to be caught off guard. Glad to hear that you or your kids weren't hurt.
     

  3. reluctantpatriot

    reluctantpatriot I am good without god.

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    Both of my rams are somewhat agressive, but that is because unlike my buck goats, they have no female companions to release stress upon. I use a stick as an attitude adjuster. One good pop on the head and the rams understand who is boss again. I usually have the most problems when feeding their morning and evening grain.

    In your situation, I can understand why you were surprised, though I am sorry you had to shoot your ram. I never trust any animal, of either gender, and I am prepared to defend myself if I have to. Never trust an animal to stop running when they are coming toward you as sometimes they aren't able to stop when you think.

    Honestly,I am beginning to understand why shepherds have crooks. They can hook them around the neck to retrieve the sheep and also bop them a few feet away too.
     
  4. Ross

    Ross Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    My goodness I wonder what set him off like that!! My boys have had their rambuncious moments but are generally well behaved (I can flip any of them on their butt with little trouble no matter how aggresive they are) and the kids know to stay away but it is always a worry. Glad your neighbor could help!!
     
  5. SilverVista

    SilverVista Well-Known Member

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    Doodles, please consider discussing this event with a veterinarian. What you have described isn't an aggressive ram, it's an enraged maniac. We've had many rams over the last 20 years, with 5 very different breeds represented, and anywhere from 1 to 5 working rams at the same time. I've had years where I carried an ax handle every single time I went into the pasture, whether the ewes were with the rams, or the rams were "baching" it, but I've never seen anything like you're describing. The idea of a ram attacking you, then laying in wait to attack you again when you returned with help makes me wonder about things like rabies. A call to a vet experienced in farm livestock would at least give you an idea if there is more to be worried about.

    Thank goodness you didn't discover this guy and his problem attitude in the middle of the night! I do that kind of thing too, out in the livestock when the whole family is asleep. Seems like overkill, but nowadays I carry my cell phone every time I walk in the pastures or work in the barn, or drive the tractor. Even with everybody awake, it could be hours before anyone wondered why I hadn't come in.

    Susan
     
  6. kesoaps

    kesoaps Well-Known Member

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    Holy cow! What a nightmare to live through. Glad everyone's okay, aside from I'm sure a few bumps and bruises. Thankfully, it wasn't one of the kids who he went after!
     
  7. primroselane

    primroselane Well-Known Member

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    Never had an aggressive ram experience. Wonder if that behavior is typical to certain breeds.
     
  8. doodles

    doodles Well-Known Member

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    Unfortunately this ram has been rank since I bought him at 5 months of age. He was absolutely stunning to look at. He had inpecable breeding and was a good herd sire. I knew that he was a problem but made excuses to overlook it. I refuse to sell him to the many folks that wanted him for fear that he would kill some one. I slaughtered all of his sons but his ewe lambs are fabulous. He must have been in testo overdrive!
    I have 9 rams here now and can handle them all. I never really trust them but have spent my life around bulls and stallions too so I don'ty take too many risks.
    I am just so happy that it is over. I knew that it would eventually come to this. I should have butchered him after his first breeding season. His lambs were so nice that my greedy side too over:)
     
  9. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    glad to hear you did not get hurt! one of our rams charged at me last spring ,luckily there were sheep in the way and it blunted the force of the blow even after 15 months my back aches though some of that might be another accident i had in june. after 32 years of working with animals was first time one has injuered me . even ewes jostling for grain can be deadly!! after a bout of solitary he settled down but is slated to become pepperettes and sheep skin rug(beautiful black pelt!!!) cell is a good idea ,if you find a problem late at night easy to get help.
     
  10. sancraft

    sancraft Well-Known Member

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    My buck goat got aggressive when I seperated him from the odes after they gave birth. He was aggravating them so much, they were literally hiding from him. He knocked me down once and that was it. He was sold the next day. He got aggressive once before when away from the ladies, but I was married then. He butted my husband and he punched him in the nose and knocked him out cold. That buck respected my Dh after that. Did you butcher him?
     
  11. bergere

    bergere Just living Life

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    Am just glad you are ok.

    I have always eaten any livestock that shows any signs of aggressive behavior. You are right, having such an animal no matter how nice it looks, is not worth the risk of getting hurt.
    Yes, I am very picky about the temperament of my animals, for good reason.

    There are too many good Rams out there and hope you are able to find a nice level headed Ram in the future.
     
  12. ajaxlucy

    ajaxlucy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Scary! Thanks for sharing your experience. I was thinking of getting a ram this fall to put in with my ewes and this is a good cautionary tale.
     
  13. Shahbazin

    Shahbazin Well-Known Member

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    The good rams are out there, though; a good way to get a decent tempered one is to buy an older ram, where the current owner has kept a lot of his daughters & needs to bring in new blood. I have sold a ram like that to a friend, & have bought a ram like that myself. My friend's previous ram was some sort of Rambouillet cross, & was a nasty customer - she kept him in line with a cattle prod, but one time he got her cornered & she had to scramble over a 5 ft fence to get away from him. He was shipped out the next day.
     
  14. HunterTed

    HunterTed Rockin B Farm

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    My ram has the bad habit of running up to me wanting me to scratch him between his horns and along his back. When I stop he gets in front of me when I try to walk away. If I still ignore him he will back up and run up to me. He doesnt hit me hard but he does bump me to let me know he wants more attention. It's my fault I played a little rough with him as a youngster. I really do not worry about him hurting me. But I do keep my eye on him. I am 6' 5" and go around 375 so I can throw him around like a rag doll even though he is full grown. But I do worry about the times when I am out of town and my wife has to feed the stock, so I am building a seperate pasture to keep him in that my wife does not have to go in to feed him. Bottom line is rams can hurt you even if they do not intend to and you must be cautious of them at all times.
     
  15. mawalla

    mawalla Well-Known Member

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    Holy Cow! He should have been named "Cujo". I'm glad you are alright and that he will no longer be a problem or a worry to you or to your children.
     
  16. kabri

    kabri Almst livin the good life

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    Wow, I'm glad you are ok!!! as everyone else has said, that is the most extreme I've ever heard of. That's exactly why we are so sad to have to put our cheviot ram up for sale... he is 4 and a real nice boy, has never turned agressive like every other ram we've had.
     
  17. Patty0315

    Patty0315 Well-Known Member

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    Mean animals = dead animal here. No breeding lines is worth a human life. I have heard stories like this before with not so nice out comes. we will be keeping are ram over another year because he is so well natured. I am not sure I would have wanted any offspring from that ill natured of an animal. Keep it in mind for when his daughters have lambs , the rams may be nasty too. Glad you made it out oK
     
  18. livestockmom

    livestockmom Well-Known Member

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    I am so glad this worked out okay, I, too have had a nasty ram before, he once got me down and was unrelentless in trying to keep me down, thank goodness DH was able to get him off me, He was only 10 mo. old but a huge Registered Suffolk, He was sold the next day...too dangerous. Im so thankful you and the children were not hurt.
     
  19. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    That isn't necessarily a mean ram, there are a few who are just psycho and need to be invited to dinner yes. but, most of the time the problem is the farmer, who when the ram is little, cuddles it and scratches it and feeds it by hand and tries to make it into a pet. This habituates the ram to people and makes the ram think the people are part of the flock. How do rams determine pecking order........they RAM. If they don't regard you as another sheep, they will will keep thier distance unless you threaten them. Other times they freak because they want to mate and you are stopping them, by putting a fence between them and their ewes


     
  20. GrannieD

    GrannieD Well-Known Member

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