Dairy Goats

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Farmgirl8388, Sep 25, 2004.

  1. Farmgirl8388

    Farmgirl8388 Active Member

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    Hey Yall,
    I had ask before whether a dairy goat has to milked every day if you do not wabt her to produce milk. I really also wanted to know if you keep milking even though she is not breed she will contuine to milk yes? And i also wanted to know as much about Alpine Does as much as you can offer. Thanks so much for all the help you can offer.
    Sincerly Yours Lyn :yeeha:
     
  2. Tracy in Idaho

    Tracy in Idaho Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you don't want her to produce milk, then you're correct -- just don't milk her.

    Some does will milk for years without being rebred -- I think the longest I heard of was four years or so?

    I have lots of Alpine does, what do you want to know specifically? :)

    Tracy
     

  3. geminigoats

    geminigoats Well-Known Member

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    Northern Maine
    Like Tracy said, if you want her to produce milk then milking every day is important, milking stimulates the need for her to produce more milk. Does can milk through for a yr or more if not bred back. My beloved Jackie, my Alpine Doe, milked through one yr because she didn't like the first Alpine buck I bought for her, he wasn't of a worthy pedigree in her opinion or something and didn't go near him. The next yr she liked the new boy!

    I also have Alpines and know the bloodlines well, so if you need to know about bloodlines, etc Tracy or I can help.

    Bernice
     
  4. DWFarms

    DWFarms Member

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    Ok, I am not sure if you have one in milk or not but this is just some useful info.

    Just dry her off gradually and you shouldn't have any problems. Don't just quit milking you could cause her to get mastitis and that could really do damage to her udder.
     
  5. Farmgirl8388

    Farmgirl8388 Active Member

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    Well i just want to know about the facts and the stuff that is important to know about raising these type of goats.
    Lyn
     
  6. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    Hi Lyn, As you may know, there are a fairly large number of books on stuff that is important to know in raising goats. We have no idea what your level of experience is. Have you ever raised anything at all? Do you know the difference between feeding a ruminant and feeding a monogastric animal? Or are you looking for tips on maximizing milk production and butterfat? Do you know anything about shelter or fencing? Feed? Trimming hooves and other routine maintenance? See what I mean? We really do need a more specific question or more information about your situation in order to be of assistance. If you can't think of specifics, browse the forum for a while. Maybe that will help you come up with something we can work with.
     
  7. Farmgirl8388

    Farmgirl8388 Active Member

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    I need to know the difference between feeding a ruminant and feeding a monogastric animal? Feed? I also need to know about Trimming hooves and other routine maintenance? Thanks And if this helps i just bought a book about dairy goats so but was going for aouble help. Lyn
     
  8. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    OK, ruminant feeding 101. Monogastric (single-stomached) animals, like people, pigs, dogs and chickens, digest their food directly. Ruminants don't. Ruminants provide a nice environment for bacteria, including plenty of food for the bacteria. They then take their nutrients from the bacteria. So the bacteria digest the food, the ruminants digest the bacteria (and bacterial waste products). This is important because bacteria aren't all that flexible in what they can eat. So if you're feeding grass hay, you have certain types of bacteria. If you suddenly switch to pure alfalfa, the grass-digesting bacteria can die off in huge numbers, producing toxins. At the same time, there are no alfalfa-digesting bacteria available to feed the goat, so it is weakened both from the toxins and from not having any nutrients coming in. The goat gets sick and possibly dies. Monogastrics, on the other hand can go from broccoli to hamburgers to ice cream without any such problems. The take home lesson is to make any dietary changes for ruminants SLOWLY so, for example, the grass bacteria can die off in reasonable numbers and the alfalfa bacteria can have time to build up their population.

    This link: http://fiascofarm.com/goats/hoof-trim-rf.htm will take you to a great web page on trimming goat hooves. In fact, the whole FiasCo Farms website is terrific. You should spend a lot of time there. And come back with any specific questions you have left. There won't be many, as the site is pretty darned comprehensive.