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Discussion Starter #1
My one year old son just went off of baby formula and onto whole cows milk and is having problems digesting it. (Spitting up a lot and smells really yuck)
We've been thinking about a dairy goat for a while now so this seems like a good time to do it. Have lots of goat experience but not with dairy breeds. What type would you guys recommend and also any other advice would be appreciated. Thanks! Kathy :)
 

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Knitting Rocks!
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Hearstrings, I am by no means an expert, but I have an opinion! lol!
I am milking a nubian, an alpine and an alpine mix right now. The Alpine and Nubian are neck to neck for favorite. They are both heavy milkers with rich creamy sweat milk. We drink raw, and my children have done well on it.
My DS#3 had the same problems as yours with store bought milk (and they got worse!), when we went to raw cows milk for him he did great, so I would encourage you to get a milk goat soon, or locate the milk if you can.
I know lots more folks will speak up and we all have our different breeds. Pick what works for you, taste the milk first and have fun!
 

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Icelandic Sheep
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I think the Weston A. Price Foundation (natural health foundation) has a recipe for goat's milk infant formula. I believe the website is: www.westonaprice.org

As for a dairy goat recommendation, I'd recommend either nubians or alpines. I think they have the best tasting milk. Now I'll get flamed by all the people who keep other breeds. LOL :)

Here's a brief excerpt from "Home Cheese Making" by Ricki Carroll:

"... If you are looking for your own goats, Nubians and Alpines are good producers and tend to have the sweetest milk. Saanens often produce more milk, but it has a stronger flavor. Toggenburgs produce a slightly lower yield, but also a strong flavor."

Flame Ricki Carroll, folks. Not me :)

RedTartan
 

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People cannot tell the difference between cows milk and my Saanen milk ! But you need to pick a breed you like. Hopefully you will be able to try some of there milk before buying.


Patty
 

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RedTartan said:
Here's a brief excerpt from "Home Cheese Making" by Ricki Carroll:

"... If you are looking for your own goats, Nubians and Alpines are good producers and tend to have the sweetest milk. Saanens often produce more milk, but it has a stronger flavor. Toggenburgs produce a slightly lower yield, but also a strong flavor."

Flame Ricki Carroll, folks. Not me :)

RedTartan
I think Ricki's info is outdated (although I love her book!)> She obviously missed the most perfect breed altogether, because their newer on the scene. Lamanchas!!! They have wonderful, sweet-tasting milk, produce a lot of it, and have wonderfully sweet and QUIET personalities too.

Seriously though....
IN GENERAL: Nubians have rich, sweet milk. But they don't give as much milk and can be quite noisy and demanding. Alpines give more milk, but it's not as rich as Nubians. They are quieter, but tend to be more agressive. I believe Sannens and Toggs are known for stronger-tasting milk, good for cheese-making especially. Lamachas milk is not quite as rich as Nubians, but close. They probably milk more then Nubians, but less then Alpines. They tend to be quiet and docile, but you have to be able to get past the ears. :)

But that's all just generalities. It will vary by animal and breeding. I think most breeds will work fine for your family milk supply. In your situation, I would look for breeds that are easily available in your area. And those breeds for which you can easily find a buck to use once a year.
 

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Togg are known for there stronger tasting milk in some lines . I have never heard Saanens being known for stronger tasting milk.

Not all alpines are bad either I have one here who is a sweetie.

Go out look at all the breeds at different farms and county fairs then decide.


Patty
 

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Where do you live?
If it is my area I do have one doe for sale that is a registered alpine and I also have goat milk for sale.

Where ever you live there will probably be someone in your area that has the same.

Try the milk first before buying a goat is you can.
Make sure that is in fact the problem with your Child.

Do you know how to milk?

I taught myself after some nice lady at the fair gave me the basics.

As far as breed goes, I am sure that all breeds have goats that both give good tasting milk and not so good tasting milk.

I personally did not like Toggenburg milk but my goats were all related and all probably had that cheese milk line in them.

I now have alpines and one alpine/togg cross. She has good milk but her Mom's milk is still the best. The Mom is an alpine.
 

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why hide it?
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Get a breed you like to look at but more importantly, get a productive and healthy animal. Also, don't get one that you have to break in yourself. There are so many lovely and willing milkgoats out here that you should be able to find one that happily hops up on the milkstand and volunteers her milk into that pail. You want a goat bred for this purpose and not a "weed-eater" type dairy goat. Their are good and bad repersentatives of each breed. A good descent dairy goat should give you a gallon a day for an extended lactaion. They should be able to milk well for 10 months more or less. That gives you a ballpark. Don't let anyone tell you that 2 cups of milk is a great milker for instance. inform yourself. Also, buy healthy animals. Goats are far too much like pets to have the heartbreak of having to cull or put down one becuase they came up with CAE or Cl amoung other things. Alos, it is cheaper in the long run to buy viigourous healthy animals than try to "rescue" something because it is "cute". They are all cute! (This is not to say don't rescue, this is to say, buy a hard-working healthy animal if that is what your intentions are originally. Stick to the plan).

I have had many breeds and I like my LaManchas, hard-working, dependable, hard to dry up, they WANT to be in milk. Very personable and docile. Easy easy breed to be around. Calm and sweet. Thick, creamy, sweet milk. But no ears, LOL!
 

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Knitting Rocks!
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Feral Nature said:
Also, don't get one that you have to break in yourself. There are so many lovely and willing milkgoats out here that you should be able to find one that happily hops up on the milkstand and volunteers her milk into that pail.
I second this for sure! It isn't easy to get one willing to get on the milkstand if they dont know what it's for!
 

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Before you buy one, have them teach you how to milk and milk her yourself. This way y ou'll know how, you'll get to find out what she's like to milk and you can forgo buying her if she's difficult to milk, and you'll have an idea of how much she'll produce.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I tried to post a reply earlier but I keep getting knocked offline (dialup). First, I apologize for not replying sooner but my beans are coming on and the baby is trying to walk and we had church camp all last week so I am frazzled! :baby04: I have had a LaMancha before but she had only been used as a brush goat and was wild if you touched her udder. She was a sweetie other than that! I live in West Virginia so if anyone close has a milker let me know. I'm looking for something reasonable, not too old and not real expensive, not real worried about the things that don't matter, just healthy and friendly. The health is of most importance to me and the flavor of the milk. I really appreciate all your advice and help. Oh, and she needs to be friendly because she will end up being a pet too!! Kathy
 
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