dairy farm pictures

Discussion in 'Countryside Families' started by michiganfarmer, Dec 4, 2006.

  1. michiganfarmer

    michiganfarmer Max Supporter

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    I dont know if I ever posted these picture. THey are of me and my now 14 year old son back in 1995 when I was milking cows. I sure miss it.

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  2. Ravenlost

    Ravenlost Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Those photos of your son are so sweet!
     

  3. shar

    shar Well-Known Member

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    Great Pictures Of You And Your Son, I Bet Its Hard To Believe
    He's Grown So Much Since That Picture Was Taken.



    Shar
     
  4. Dec429

    Dec429 Well-Known Member

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    I grew up on a big dairy farm in Missouri, could not wait to get away from it when I was 18, but sure miss it now!

    Great pics by the way!!

    Don
     
  5. farmergirl

    farmergirl Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Max,
    I have wanted 1 jersey cow for years now, but haven't had the time or funds to purchase and milk one. I'm getting serious about carving out the time needed to incorporate a milk cow into our daily routine. Can you give me a first hand perspective of how that would affect my daily life? What sort of time committment does 1 milk cow require? I'm excited to buy one, but don't want to get in over my head!
     
  6. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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    farmergirl it does not take much, I spent a lot of time with mine just cause I liked to be down there with the critters but really to feed and water and milk only takes at the most 30 min twice a day less once you get into the routine and your in a hurry though of course that depends on whether you carry water in a bucket or you set up labor saving features.
     
  7. jnap31

    jnap31 garden guy

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    I just see red X's where the pictures are and when I click I get (maybe cause ofthe government computer?)
    Your request was denied because of its content categorization: "Software Downloads" (policy_denied)


    If you think you have reached this page in error submit a trouble ticket via the FortSill intranet/helpdesk.
     
  8. michiganfarmer

    michiganfarmer Max Supporter

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    the biggest thing is you have to milk her twice a day 7 days a week if you want her production to stay up. A milk cow really ties you to the homestead. If you milk her by hand it takes between 15 and 30 minutes by the time you feed her, wash her teats, wait a minute for her milk to let down, milk her, then strain the milk, and get it in containers small enough to fit in your fridge. Milking time by hand is about 10 minutes. If you can get a milking machine then milking time is about 3-4 minutes.
     
  9. michiganfarmer

    michiganfarmer Max Supporter

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    if you would like to see them I'll email them to you. whats your email?
     
  10. michiganfarmer

    michiganfarmer Max Supporter

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    sure is. he is getting a mustache, and some black fuzz on his chin now,lol
     
  11. FarmboyBill

    FarmboyBill Well-Known Member Supporter

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    And all im saying is whats already been said. A cow/cows have to be milked twice a day, just about the same time also. If not, the first thing that will happen will cause the cow stress , which will cause less milk to be givin to you. Then youll have mastitis, then youll lose your cow. Thats what happened to me when I left home, and got married, but didnt settle down and get to farming, instead, We went out on Fri night, and I would milk Sat morning somwhere around 10/noon. Went out on Sat night and the same thing Sunday, after church, It caused me to lose a cow that was givin to me by a deceaased favorite uncle and I hated that. It also caused me to lose the wife first, and then the farm
     
  12. Melissa

    Melissa member

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    Nice pictures. I want a cow too, but probably won't be getting one with my heart problems I don't think I could handle the extra work. BUT a friend wants to start milking some extra cows and sell the milk of the government in Ohion decides milk is safe to sell! Let's hope because I am going to be his first customer.
     
  13. farmergirl

    farmergirl Well-Known Member Supporter

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    That's what I mean about getting in over my head. I don't want to start out with a beautiful dairy cow, only to let her down because I don't have the time it takes to care for her/ milk her frequently. But, from what I've read here, it sounds like I can incorporate the tasks into my daily routine fairly easily. I can get up 1/2 hour earlier, spend 1/2 hour less time doing household tasks/ watching late night tv, etc at the end of the day. Max's description sounds do-able.
     
  14. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    At one time I milked 200 head.7 days a week.Got $50 a week and Trailer House.Sure didn't have time for too much running around.

    Ah I never mind milking Cows.

    big rockpile