Cutting flowers

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by HilltopDaisy, Dec 18, 2005.

  1. HilltopDaisy

    HilltopDaisy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I would love to have a nice area of cutting flowers but I have limited experience. Most of what I've grown in the past doesn't stay nice for very long once it's cut. I'm thinking zinnias, and maybe taller marigolds. Any suggestions?
     
  2. cherig22

    cherig22 Active Member

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    There are varieties of mini sunflowers, they grow pretty fast. Used for cut flowers rather than seed.

    Others are mums, carnations, old species shurb roses (not as difficult as hybrids), daisies.....

    My favorite thing to do is look through seed catalogs. Especially in winter!

    Cheri
     

  3. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Sweet peas. Everlastings. Statice. Daisies.
     
  4. dlangland

    dlangland dlangland

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    Calendula is nice, and has a lot of uses, plus it's edible. Calendula biscuits are really neat. Daisies are probably my favorite, even though they don't last that long, but they are one of the first to do it's thing in the spring. Sweet William is precious, but it's a bi-annual. It lasts a long time if you cut it just as it's starting to bloom. Last yr. for my daughter's graduation I cut a lot of that and brought in. Deb
     
  5. Marcia in MT

    Marcia in MT Well-Known Member Supporter

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    A few of my favorites:
    Gloriosa daisies (rudbeckia)
    Statice
    Zinnias
    Scabiosa (Pincushion Flower)
    Snapdragons

    Germania Seed Co in Chicago has lots of recommendations, as does Johnny's. The newsletter "Growing for Market" has a regular column and several references, plus the editor is a flower farmer. Even if you don't plan to grow cutting flowers on a large basis, it's nice to know what's out there. And most grow from seed, although there are started plants, too.
     
  6. hisenthlay

    hisenthlay a.k.a. hyzenthlay

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    I'm doing this for the first time next year too. Any advice you guys have for newbies, generally, would be appreciated.

    Here are some things I'm thinking of, mostly because I liked them as cut flowers at the florist:
    Freesia
    Stock
    Cockscomb
    Statice
    Baby's Breath
    Bells of Ireland
    Foxglove
    Hydrangea
    Nigella
    Gladiolus
    Delphiniums
    Columbine
    Astilbe
    Campanula
    Lupine
    Poppies
    Sweet Peas
    Acidanthera
    Daffodils...

    Whew. I need to trim that list back a bit, obviously. Those are just some of the candidates--I'll probably do about 10 of them, each in small amounts. I'm ambitious, but limited in space. And I've been spending too much time with the seed catalogue. I already planted the spring bulbs, of course (so maybe those won't count as part of my ten ;) ).

    Any hints for success, gardeners?
     
  7. woodspirit

    woodspirit Well-Known Member

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    It's good to see so many want to learn about plants. Best advice I have is to look at your specific site and then read about the plants and try to match up the growing conditions. It is a never ending process, and you are going to kill many plants but don't give up. Some plants might disappoint you after they grow as well. they may not look like the catalogues. Make this your goal for this year. Go to a large garden center once each week for the whole season. Bring a notebook and take many notes. Divide them up by size or color or foliage. Gardening doesn't just happen in the garden. you can enjoy it while you walk in a park or visit friends or writing your own notes about it. Keep learning and remember the best gardners have killed the most plants.
     
  8. Mutti

    Mutti Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If you want to try LOTS of different flowers look in the discounted section of the seed catalogs...like Jungs or Parks. Will have lists of flowers for around 75 cents a pack....I always look there first! Cheaper than Wallyworld which is actually a cheap place to get alot of annual flower seeds...DEE who has more raised beds filled with flowers than she does veggies :D
     
  9. woodspirit

    woodspirit Well-Known Member

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    You should try growing Crocosmia. Great color and form. Lucifer is the one I like best but I'm partial to red. Comes in yellow and orange too.
     
  10. hisenthlay

    hisenthlay a.k.a. hyzenthlay

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    Ooooh, those are nice. I'm partial to red AND orange. Uh oh, guess that's another one to add to my overcrowded list of candidates!
     
  11. mommagoose_99

    mommagoose_99 Well-Known Member

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    Hilltop Daisy when I was selling at the farmers markets in Vestal and Endicott, I sold several kinds of cut flowers. The top three were Gladiolas , sunflowers and Zinnias. It is important to harvest them correctly to get the longest life out of them. Cut the flower on a 45 degree angle with a sharp shear. Its best to cut very early in the morning when its cool or the night before. Place the cut flower in a bucket of room temperature water to which you have added a couple of dolops(less than a Tablespoon per 5 gallon pail) bleach and 2 table spoons of sugar. I have also used the professional preservative mixes to the water. I pick the glads when there are only 3-4 blooms open and color is showing on the tips of the rest of the spray. I pick zinnias that are fairly tight but they last forever even when they are completely open. I pick the sunflowers as soon as they look good. I sell wholestems . Sometimes sunflowers make a second flush from side shoots. I found several tall waste baskets hold a lot of gladiolas and sunflowers and they come in lots of colors. I used white or green ones. If the sunflowersa are really tall put a brick in the bottom of the pail to keep it from tipping over. Got to run. I am at work.
    Linda