Curious about raising pigs

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by mvfarms91, Oct 13, 2003.

  1. mvfarms91

    mvfarms91 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    65
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    Oct 12, 2003
    Ok, bear with me here. I would love to raise my own pigs (Don't get me wrong Wendy yours are great) and I want to know pros and cons of it all:
    Should I keep boar and sow. Should I buy piglets, if so where would I get them and how much should I expect to pay. If i had both mom and dad on premise what would that require. How many piglets in one litter is norm. Can I house them on concrete for easy clean up? Any thing else any one can think of would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks,
    Susie
     
  2. cowgirlone

    cowgirlone Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    colorado
    For starters I would get a couple to fatten for the freezer first. See if you like having them around, then decide if you want to raise piglets.
    People usually buy small ones in the spring, fatten them up all summer and butcher in the fall when it's cool.
    Depending on the weather in your area. Pigs burn a lot of energy just to keep warm in winter and don't put weight on fast.
    I have raised and butchered them year round with no problems.

    If you decide to keep a boar and sows, two or more sows would make it more worth your time. A boar eats a lot and by just servicing one sow he wouldn't be worth keeping around.
    A sow can have anywhere from a few piglets to over a dozen at a time. You will want to breed them more than once a year to make it pay.
    Pigs are cheap, but if you raise them and build up your clientale, you can make money at it. Raising a couple of pigs for your freezer is getting to be a popular thing to do, People want to know where their meat comes from. If you get a good reputation of having healthy, non medicated pigs, you will do good.

    As far as concrete, it would be easy to clean. Lots of people raise them that way with no problems. I prefer to let them have dirt. They love to root around in the dirt and they love water holes to keep cool.
    If you do decide to keep a boar and some sows, you will need a separate pen for the boar and separate pens for each sow when they give birth. After they wean the piglets, you can put the boar and sows together again.

    The only downside I can think of would be fencing. You need a good fence no matter how many pigs you get. I like to use the 16' hog panels. They have smaller holes at the bottom to keep the piglets from crawling through.
    Also, pigs don't smell that bad, but I would locate your pen away from the house and in an area that the wind won't bring the smell to you.

    I know I've misssed a lot, but this is long. Sorry! :oops:
     

  3. mvfarms91

    mvfarms91 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
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    Oct 12, 2003
    Thank yo cowgirlone. That was really helpful!! I think you are right I should try it first before going a little farther. A friend of mine has sold us a pig for 2 years in a row and it was the best pork I have ever had. I have quit my job to stay at home working the land and being a better mom and I would like to save money by doing as much as possible on our own.

    Thanks again.
    Susie
     
  4. Farmall

    Farmall Active Member

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    Jul 27, 2003
    Were it me, i wouldnt get any now. as stated, its too late in the season, they eat more feed in winter, water becomes more of a chore, ect. I would first fence off my garden to make it hog tight. Then I would start building my hog house and fencing in the pig pen. Realize that the bigger your pen is the less trouble you will hav e with them wanting to get out unless you starve them. I am talking 100ft sq min. Mine is 100 by 200 in heavily wooded area with a pond in it. The more trees in it the better as they will eat the nuts ect that they can find. Pasture ios good too solong as they have somwhere they can go for shade as they cant swiet. If you dont have a pond for them, they will make a wallow whether you want one or not. Best thing is to start a wallow where you want one rather than taking a chance ytheyll make one where you dont want it. When late winter came, I would buy 3 gilt wiened pigs and put them in the garden. Dig post holes the depth of the digger blades and fill the first one full of ground corn. Eachnight dig a new hole the same depth, but only 1/2 way fill it, and dig additional holes to utalize the amount of feed you intend to feed each night. Dig them 3ft apart until you have vocered the whole garden at 3ft intervals. Around the 2nd week, switch to shelled corn. Be on the lookout for rocks,roots, ect that they dredge to the top and get them, out as they will rebury them again before a month is out. At the end of the month, when your ready to start your garden, take them out and put them in the hog pen. They being sisters will grow up together and you will learn from them. They will fuss and fight, but itall befamil so it wont be vicious. When theyre 6 mos old, buy 2 boars of around the same size or slightly bigger of 2 different breeds. Leave them with the girls but in another pen for a week, next to them, then put them in with the girls for a week, then either butcher them or sell them. In 3 months, 3 weeks, 3 days or so, ou will start to have pigs. Milkstoolcow boy has givin me what I think is some good advice and Im going to try it, but between now and that time you can be looking at farrowing house setups and be getting ready. It is best to farrow them in a clean pen away from the hog pen, and to only utalize it for that purpose. Sice you bred them at the same time theyll drop at the same time nearly and so youll have to have a setup for all 3 to farrow at the same time. This as opposed to keeping the boar for 3 mos and breeding a sow a month and utalizing only one farrowing stall, your choice. Also, you need to rig up[ a granery where you can buy and store shelled corn and wheat in ton lots as it is way cheaper to buy it thus. THis area can be made out of 4 railroad ties, 16 concrete blocks, 5 1in pieces of 4 X 8 plywood, 10 8ft 2 X 4s, nails and 4 6ft 1 X 12s. If you are interested on it ill tell you more. It will have to be built in a place where you can get to it with your pickup or trailer, able to keep coons, possums, and birds out of it, yet able to let cats roam at will to keep mice and rats down.n Let us know how it turns out for you. OH and youll feel much more like a farmer when you got them on the place in addition with what else you now haver. I miss not having some, butr im building my 32sq hog/goat house and hav nt got it done yeat, and ive been laid off since April, so I cant afford to feed them either. Enjoy