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http://www.realtree.com/timber-2-table/how-to-cure-and-smoke-your-own-bacon

I have used the process in link above to cure some pork.

Be nice to hear some other ideas on how to cure and cold smoke bacon now that it is cool weather.

Had cured bacon for dinner from 700 lb. bluebutt boar i butchered last week. The cured bacon is 1/8 inch. thick and 2 inches wide a bit of fat in it. Just enough fat to gave it that really good flavor. Some of this bacon will be in my smoker tomorrow.

Best,
Gerold.
 

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That is a dry rub which is what I do. I've used maple syrup, honey, dextrose and have molasses/dextrose curing now. I mix and match. I also have a side curing which I added garlic to which I intend to renovate soon and re-rub with pastrami spices. This will be new to me. It should work.

I like dry rub over brine because it removes moisture. I smoke with hickory, apple, maple, mesquite and/or pecan. I'm finding pecan to work extremely well on maple/dextrose cured bacon. I toss in a little mesquite which is kind of exotic for my neck of the woods.

Jowls work too but makes for odd looking bacon. They are more meaty and absorb maple syrup flavor better than sides in my experience. Fat doesn't seem to pick it up. I also will cut fresh ham steaks about 2.5 inches thick and dry cure these. I haven't brined for years but am thinking on doing some this winter.
 

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That is a dry rub which is what I do. I've used maple syrup, honey, dextrose and have molasses/dextrose curing now. I mix and match. I also have a side curing which I added garlic to which I intend to renovate soon and re-rub with pastrami spices. This will be new to me. It should work.

I like dry rub over brine because it removes moisture. I smoke with hickory, apple, maple, mesquite and/or pecan. I'm finding pecan to work extremely well on maple/dextrose cured bacon. I toss in a little mesquite which is kind of exotic for my neck of the woods.

Jowls work too but makes for odd looking bacon. They are more meaty and absorb maple syrup flavor better than sides in my experience. Fat doesn't seem to pick it up. I also will cut fresh ham steaks about 2.5 inches thick and dry cure these. I haven't brined for years but am thinking on doing some this winter.
Thanks for the ideas. I will try the pastrami spices, i haven't used that before. The Pecan sounds good. I will also try Pecan.

Best,
Gerold.
 

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Mortons sugar cure is what we have used since the 50's. The amount is always 1 pint for a ''joint'' and a 1/2 pint for a side. It will draw the moisture out for a week or so. Then we wipe it well with warm water and dry before it is cold smoked. If it is to salty with that amount of time, just wash off the cure a little sooner.
 

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Mortons sugar cure is what we have used since the 50's. The amount is always 1 pint for a ''joint'' and a 1/2 pint for a side. It will draw the moisture out for a week or so. Then we wipe it well with warm water and dry before it is cold smoked. If it is to salty with that amount of time, just wash off the cure a little sooner.
Hi Wanda. I have used morton canning and pickling salt a few times. Last year i used some Maple favor from the meat locker in town. It was good but cost quite a bit.
 

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I cure my bacon with the hide on it and smoke it that way. I leave it to cure and age for 10 to 12 days before smoking then let it rest for a few days to mellow. I leave the bacon as slab and slice as needed. By leaving the hide on bacon, it makes for easy slicing and cleanup. I take out a slab, cut along the hide to desired depth, then slice. I do this on newspaper which saves greasing up a cutting board which is a PIA to clean. It is also easy on the knife edge which I keep very sharp. The pastrami slabs will be skinned when I renovate them, most likely tomorrow.

If I have bacon which is a little too salty I will slice it and put it in cold water for 20 minutes then fry it up. It takes the salt out and doesn't affect the flavor.

I don't freeze bacon. I firmly believe it will keep better flavor if not frozen.
 

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dry cure 7-12 days depending on thickness; traditional is brown sugar with mustard seed, coriander seed, cracked pepper; maple sugar cured with allspice, cinnamon, juniper; asian style cured with palm sugar, ginger, szechuan pepper, lemongrass. once cured rinse, dry, allow pellicle to form, ~36 hours or so. temperature based on how much smoke i wan't; low temp, longer more intense smoke...anywhere from 120-200 degrees. heavier spiced cures get hardwoods like hickory or mesquite; apple or cherry for the sweeter less spiced/peppery cures.

jowls are typically used for guanciale which is delicious. as the temps get cooler this might be something to try if you have a place to hang it, or an old refrigerator that you can rig up to allow it to air cure. tasso i use shoulder cuts and smoke right along with andouille sausage. sliced thin and added to a ham sandwich or cut into lardons and added to pasta...outstanding.

Charcuterie (polcyn, rhulman) is a good starter book, although i cut back the salt a bit.
 

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Here is what i follow.got it from a older 2 generation butcher.
Real simple curing brine:
for every 1 gallon of water, add:
1/3 - 1 cup sea salt (depending if you're on a lo-salt diet)
1 cup granulated sugar or Splenda®
1 cup brown sugar or Splenda® brown sugar mix
1 tbsp cure no. 1 pink salt
stir thoroughly until clear amber color, pour over meat, inject if necessary to cure from inside-out as well as outside-in
weight down with a partially filled 1 qt or 1 gal. ziploc bag or bags to keep meat immersed
Curing times vary with meat, but generally overnight to 2-3 days for chickens and turkeys, 8-10 days buckboard bacon, 10-14 days belly bacon, pork shoulder, whole butts, 3-4 weeks whole hams, 10-20 days corned beef (fresh beef roasts, briskets, rolled rib roasts, etc.) If whole muscle is more than 2" thick, then inject so it can cure i/o as well as o/i, and/or in and around bone structures, etc.
You can add any other flavorings you'd like, this is just the basic curing brine. 1 heaping tablespoon of cure is about 1 ounce. The maximum concentration allowed safely is 3.84 ounces per 1 gallon of brine (24 lbs.per 100 gallons: 16 oz. x 24 = 384 ounces, 1/100th is 3.84 ounces). You can experiment with different concentrations as long as you keep it between those parameters:
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I just put my first ever batch of pork belly in the fridge yesterday and started the curing process for making bacon!! I used the wet recipe at the following link, but I substituted the maple syrup for some honey that I harvested from our beehive :) I will be curing in the fridge for about 7 days, then smoking it, then frying up that bacon goodness on Thanksgiving morning for breakfast!!

The recipe for the cure I made can be found here: http://amazingribs.com/recipes/porknography/making_bacon_from_scratch.html
 

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Using honey on a dry rub is one of my favorites. Apply dry rub then pour honey all over it. Put plastic wrap over this and flatten it out to spread honey. Trying to spread honey by hand doesn't work well.

Your bacon will improve after sitting several days so if it isn't exactly what you expected on Thanksgiving, don't worry about it.
 
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