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Discussion Starter #1
I'm looking to get some quotes on getting a culvert installed at our place in VT (Westfield).
If anyone here does this kind of work or can recommend someone in the area that would be great...or if there is a "diy guide somewhere".. I don't mind hard labor.. but like to know what I'm doing.
 

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This is kind of an open ended question. A lot depends on what you are trying to span, how much water flow through the culvert, under a driveway or a farm road, how big of a culvert, distance it will run. There are so many variables here that I don't think anyone could provide a good answer.

I mean if it is only going 4 feet I would say you could do it yourself, but if you are running it 20 feet digging it by hand could be a problem, so you would need access to a backhoe..
 

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Don't know if this will help ya or not, but I have a gully I'm wanting to span. I've made arrangements (well, ok, when I get the money) to buy an old propane tank, have the ends half cut (so it leaves the strength at the ends) so the water can flow through and have some extras welded inside for more strength (I plan to drive a tractor over it).

FYI: Folks in Illinois and around use this type of culvert (from a propane tank) all the time...

Cost of tank = scrap metal price (approx $100 depending on size of tank - I want a 500 gal size)

Cost of welding/cutting/adding tug hold to pull it back to the gully with the tractor = $50-$100

Dropping it into gully and securing it = unknown labor (and cursing) for me to do

Driving over to the other side of my property with a tractor, getting firewood that's there = priceless.
 

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................I'd want a minimum of 10 feet of road surface to drive over and IF you plan on having a mobile pulled over the culverts you may want to visit with some dealers to solict their recommendation(s) . I'd pull a stingline from one side too the other with a stringline level indicating level then measure down to the point that will separate the culverts and see how much vertical distance you have . The Greater the vertical distance at the midpoint twixt the culverts the LONGER they will have to be to allow a requisite amount of Fill to bring the road bed UP to grade above their height\diameter as everytime a dumptruck runs over the fill it will compact and spreadout horizontially .
.................Also , You want too anchor the culverts with several loads of fairly large rock to assure that a large rain will NOT wash them out . Then , once that is done then you can fill in with #1 roadbase , and have it delivered..."WET" , and as the trucks drive over they will compact it and make a very solid foundation as it will dry very hard . You'll also need a tractor with boxblade and frontend loader to spread each load after it is dumped . All , it takes is Money , LOL . , fordy
 

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Discussion Starter #6
beowoulf90 said:
This is kind of an open ended question. A lot depends on what you are trying to span, how much water flow through the culvert, under a driveway or a farm road, how big of a culvert, distance it will run. There are so many variables here that I don't think anyone could provide a good answer.

I mean if it is only going 4 feet I would say you could do it yourself, but if you are running it 20 feet digging it by hand could be a problem, so you would need access to a backhoe..
This is difficult for me to explain because I know so little about dirt work.

The culvert will be for a driveway. The drive (as well as the road its off of) is unpaved. I took a look at the neighbors drives when I was there last time and they are all using a 12" culvert. Looking at the ditch it would go into is the tricky part. It is roughly 25' wide (maybe need several culverts?) and one "bank" is far higher than the other. I'd estimate the rise between the road side of the ditch and the opposite side(where the ground is level) to be about 6'. This is where I got the 25' measurement above. It maybe possible to cut into that bank (high side) and both lower the height (depth?) of needed material. which in turn would lessen the width needed for the crossing.

the only culverts available for order when I was there (2 yrs ago) was 20 footers (didn't get one because I had no way to haul and they wouldn't deliver). Which is what all the neighbors are using as well.

I took some pics while I was there (after we grubbed the stumps out) but they turned out to dark to see or have any real depth.

here is the road going down the hill. ditch is off to the right

http://www.flickr.com/photos/pcdreams/170212099/in/set-72157594170263742/

and here is one just about in front of our property

http://www.flickr.com/photos/pcdreams/170212957/in/set-72157594170263742/
 

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So the way I'm taking it the ditch is already there, you just need to place the culverts and fill in on top of them.

If this is the case, then you could use the idea from Gailann Schrader's post.
You will need to secure them if there is a lot of water flow. Which can be done by putting a concrete pad down with bolts so you can attach the culvert down, either through the culvert or strapping over the culvert.You should then add some rip rap(big rocks) in front and behind the culvert to keep it from washing out under the ends

If you use the propane tanks you will have to have a few of them welded together to get the length of run you need. You may only need one run of culvert and fill in the rest. You will need a tractor or a backhoe to do the fill work and an area where you can get the fill. Around here backhoe operators charge about $65 an hour to do the work, that is what we estimate when figuring out costs to dig trenches for plumbing and sewer work. You can also estimate it like this; $1 per foot x depth example if you are going 4 feet deep you can estimate it will cast you $4 per foot of length.

Hope that helps.
 

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lf all of your neighbours use 12" culverts, can we assume that these are adequate for the flow of water down the ditch? (i.e. - the neighbours are on the same ditch?)

If so, the propane tank idea would be overkill. I just had a 12" plastic ribbed culvert put in by my municipality, and I think they only cost a couple of hundred for a 20' length. Since you would need a backhoe anyhow, the propane tank option would not be any cheaper.

The big question is how much fill you will need, and how much will the backhoe cost. They put mine in within 2.5 hours, but both sides of the ditch were level, and the ditch was not quite as wide. I would bet 4 hours or so would do it, and based on beowulf's $65 per hour, $260 for the backhoe would likely do it. Depending on how much anchoring, riprap and other stuff you need to do, the whole job might be $600-$700.
 

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Here we can buy 12" metal culverts in 12 foot lengths for a little less than $100. They also sell connectors that can be used to put two (or more) sections of pipe together. That might be your best bet, and you can haul it on a pickup truck (or at least I did). Covering it by hand could be done, but it would be a lot of work! Good luck in whatever you choose to do.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
if that is anywhere near a ballpark in that neck of the woods I'd say it would be worth the $$ not to have to deal with it. I was guessing a couple grand.

the ditch is the same ditch the neighbors have so the 12" should handle the flow ok. Thats another issue. I don't know what the flow is. We've only been there once. And the "neighbors" are camps so there not their full time. But the culverts that are in look like they've been there quite a while, which is a good sign.

Hoping someone will come along with some recommended people to call for the work. :angel:
 

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Here is what I would do. Look up Excavating Contractors in Internet Yellow pages for the towns near your land. You don't want to pick a big company but all of the small guys will know where to order what you need, they can delivery and install in just a few hours. Should be less than $1000. If you have to send them out there to check the site then I would call a different contractor until till I get one that already knows the road. Trust me there are already two or three small guys in your area of concern that know what you need without going there. They are working for the home builders.

If the neighboring driveway culverts have been in place for more than a few years then the same size diameter will be fine. Just be aware if it IS too small a heavy rain might wash it out. Of course if you don't install it correctly it might wash out anyway. An improperly installed culvert usually ends up with water following around the outside of the pipe instead of the inside. That's why I would have a professional do it....
 

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It may be different in your part of the world. But in my area, the county will install driveway culverts for free in the ditches along the county roads. You have to purchase the culvert, but they will pick it up, install it and put one load of gravel on it - all paid by taxpayer dollars.

If it is not along a public road then forget that I said anything.

Just a thought - you may want to check with your county commissioner, or whomever maintains the public roads.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
unfortunately its off of a private road, but It can't hurt to ask anyway :)

Now that I think about it I know a guy there that builds houses. Don't remember his name but I may see him, or at least be able to find out who he is, when we go up there again. If he don't do that sorta thing he can probably recommend someone.
 
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