Crop for Hillside

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Tango, Sep 14, 2006.

  1. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    This is in northern zone 7 /southern zone 6 in south mid TN. I've got some cleared hillside that I don't want to use for pasture but don't just want to let it go unused. I've considered pines but given it is only 1 - 2 acres, doesn't seem worth it. I doubt I can ever certify that area as organic since it borders timber land and they spray yearly.

    There won't be any irrigation after the initial starting of seeds or plants and I'd rather get something that is perennial. Fruit trees seem to be a good idea as do nut trees. Probably a mix of several species/types so I don't get stuck with alot of fruit or nuts I can't consume or sell. Can anyone offer innovative suggestions that will bring in a cash flow and is not already over produced?
     
  2. wvpeach1963

    wvpeach1963 WVPEACH (Paula)

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    me too, got the same problem going here in WV at the place I bought last November.

    keep looking at that new cleared hillside behind my house and wondering what productive use to put it too.

    Don't want cows right behind the house. So will be interested in these responses.
     

  3. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    How about some kind of Berry Crop?

    big rockpile
     
  4. doohap

    doohap Another American Patriot

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    I think you could grow a number of pine trees on your property ... not so much for the timber companies to buy, but -- if you have descendents, they may prosper from the use of the few trees you could grow. Perhaps, they could cut them and build a house! It only took 23 trees for our beautiful little place.

    :)

    doohap
     
  5. Meg Z

    Meg Z winding down

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    Yep...even on just a couple acres, you could have you a 'You-Pick' berry farm in just a couple years...if you're close enough to the people who'll pay you to pick berries.

    Meg
     
  6. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Consider scuppernong muscadine grapes as a low input unique crop that has good marketability. You will get a small yield the second year. Plant fescue between the rows to control erosion.
    http://www.isons.com/
     
  7. Stephen in SOKY

    Stephen in SOKY Well-Known Member

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    Orchard? Especially if the slope is oriented to drain early cold snaps down the hill away from trees.
     
  8. Pink_Carnation

    Pink_Carnation Well-Known Member

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    Disclaimer: I have no clue about water needs or weather needs

    Raspberries, blueberries, strawberries, or what ever you notice is fairly expensive at the store.
     
  9. chas

    chas Well-Known Member

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    Two brothers planted close to an acre of black wanuts for retirement .In time planted close they will make veneer lumber.My 8 veneer logs brought 1/3 as much as all the rest on my 13 acres.
    When I logged we didn't break the canopy so the young trees would grow straight and tall with hardly any lower branches.Most of my trees now are prime veneer$$$$$$$ I can log this way every ten years!
    Chas
     
  10. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    You've hit on it.Variety as much as possible,plant them randomly.Excess sell,plant what YOU like to consume.Berries too?
    Chas had a good one......

    BooBoo
     
  11. susieM

    susieM Well-Known Member

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  12. mandyh

    mandyh Well-Known Member

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    You could plant grapes or hops.
     
  13. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Lots of suggestions, thanks! And I really like that I can pick a few and not limit myself to one. :) Great choice fora person who has trouble deciding :) Pecan trees for sure. Those little nuts are expensive :)
     
  14. Mutti

    Mutti Well-Known Member Supporter

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    How about terracing the hillside and putting in blueberries or strawberries? DEE
     
  15. patarini

    patarini Well-Known Member

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    Xmas trees are always good money makers.
     
  16. Mountaineer

    Mountaineer Well-Known Member

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    Is the ground already moist? Fruit trees, nuts, berries, they all need irrigation for a quality harvest.
    Grapes can be tortured a bit.
     
  17. Jack in VA

    Jack in VA Well-Known Member

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    Before you decde, consider one thing.......deer.
     
  18. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    Kudzu, critters love it.
     
  19. doohap

    doohap Another American Patriot

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    WATCH WHAT YOU ASK FOR! Kudzu can just about take over ... ask the state of Mississippi!!!

    :doh:
     
  20. BeckyW

    BeckyW Well-Known Member

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    Perhaps a few more details would be helpful. Orientation of the hillside? What direction does the slope face? If it is north or east facing, the answer to what will thrive is much different than south facing. Soil type? Lots of rocks? Your person labor preferences - ie labor intensive crop or plant and forget except a few times a year? Looking for a cash crop or personal use? (A friend had a u-pick raspberry farm in CA. He told me 10 planted acres was the break-even mark. Other friends had 2-1/2 acres in u-pick apples and the profit was enough to pay the taxes every year and didn't take much effort.)

    There are many homesteaders here with terrific ideas and you'll probably get even better ideas with a little more info disclosed.

    Just a thought.
    BW