Cream seperator Question

Discussion in 'Goats' started by MilfordFarm, Aug 5, 2006.

  1. MilfordFarm

    MilfordFarm Member

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    Hi all, I have been milking our dairy goat all summer...

    I have learned to make cheese curds and am hoping to try some mozzarela(sp), if I can get the kids (human) to stop drinking all of it as soon as it gets cold...

    I have a butter question...

    I want to make it...

    I cant tell for the life of me where the cream stops and starts on the top of the glass pitcher its in....

    Do I have to buy a cream seperator, and spin all of the cream out?

    if so, where can I find one that is quality and isnt going to cost 400$?, or is there even such a thing....
     
  2. Idahoe

    Idahoe Menagerie More~on

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    You and me both are looking for a cream separator under 400 . . .

    I've had dairy goats for a month now, and after the milk sits in the fridge for 24 hrs or longer, there is a stiff layer of cream on the top, but nothing like you get with raw cows milk. Goat milk doesn't separate well on it's own, and to make butter you need a cream separator, unless you skim off the cream and freeze it bit by bit. Took me a week to get 1 quart of cream (I get a gallon a day of milk).

    I've heard if you pour the milk in a shallow pan, you'll get more cream skimmed off as there is more surface area for it to collect.

    There's another thread about electric cream separators vs manual (crank) separators. It isn't complete yet that I know of. There is only a 50 dollar difference in the ones I'm looking at at Hoegger's Goat Supply .

    They are under 400 retail but you'll pay well over 400 after shipping and tax.

    I've looked on Ebay, found little, but I'm sure stuff does pop up.
     

  3. valhalladad

    valhalladad Active Member

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    Let me add a little. Goat milk has very small fat globules and doesn't seperate very well. Also the butter is white. Goat milk doesn't have the pigment of cows milk. If we wanted cream we would let it stand at least three days before we even tried a seperator. We used it mostly for ice cream. You are just as far ahead to give it to the kids, both two and four legged, as to try to make butter. I don't know your breed, but my goats tested at 3.4 to 3.7% butter fat. Do the math, it takes a lot of milk to produce a little butter. Stick with cheese for extra milk.
     
  4. Charleen

    Charleen www.HarperHillFarm.com Supporter

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    I kinda gotta agree here. For the time and work that is needed to make butter, you're only going to wind up with a little bit. We've let a quart of raw goat milk set in the fridge for sometimes up to a week. I'll ladle off the cream (our herd average is 4.2%bf) and spoon it into a plastic bowl with a lid, shake it shake it shake it and get just a spoonful of butter.
    We have a cream separator but rarely use it, mostly because it's a pain to clean.
    And valhalladad is right about goat butter being very white. It looks like lard. But it's fun to let the kids try making it and it's a nice novelty to say that you made your own butter.
     
  5. Idahoe

    Idahoe Menagerie More~on

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    I think Valhaladad hit it on the head, you don't see a lot of talk about butter from goat milk. I think I'll let go of it myself . . .

    BUT, just skimming the thick cream off the top of the quart jars (the layer is thin, but it easily lifts with a spoon) I had a quart of frozen cream in the freezer. But you need 8 - 9 quarts of cream to get a pound of butter. The cream itself would come in handy, and you're not drinking as much fat in the milk. I doubt you could tell the difference.

    I too make cottage cheese, ricotta and vinegar cheese from the extra milk. I'm freezing the latter two.