Crayfish

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by jackie c, Mar 7, 2005.

  1. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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    Crayfish, crawfish, crawdads, whatever you want to call them, the freshwater ones. Does anyone trap and eat these guys. What do they REALLY taste like, shrimp, lobster...crayfish??? :confused:
     
  2. Cygnet

    Cygnet Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Closer to shrimp than lobster, but they'll pick up the taste of whatever water they're in.

    They're good eating. I haven't had much luck with traps -- I usually kill one crawdad and use it for bait for the rest, or I'll use a sunfish carcass after it's been fileted. Something nice and smelly. They'll latch on to the bait (do this in shallow water where you can see) and you can then lift them out of the water and drop them in a bucket. IN really crawdad infested water, you can catch a bucket full in an hour this way.

    They taste good in spanish rice or as a substitute for shrimp in whatever recipe you've got -- I made crawdad pasta salad if I'm backpacking.

    Oh, there's surprisingly little meat in them.

    Leva

     

  3. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    If you will run the search feature useing 'freshwater shrimp' there is a series of posts about one member whom raises them.
     
  4. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    jackie, in our neck of the woods it wouldn't make sense to try raising them as the crayfish is endemic to our shield lakes in great numbers. I have the square crayfish traps that can catch many at a time. They seem to come into them more at night, and the water has to warm for them to be active enough to move closer to shore for trapping them. Few eat crayfish in these parts, but no reason why you couldn't. They are the preferred food of smallmouth Bass that so many lures try to imitate, so if you have a lake or stream with smallies, it's almost assured you'll be able to trap some crayfish there but leave a few million for the fish, eh?
     
  5. tobo6

    tobo6 Well-Known Member

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    We call them Crawdads here. We might get a few with a walk in trap, but usually we just send the kids down to the creek with some bacon pieces and some string. They hunt them down and put the bait right beside them, wait until they latch on, and pull them out of the water.

    Put them in a bucket of cold water with salt added, so they expel all the nasties, and then boil them. Yum!

    To me they taste more crab like ;) Throw the meat in a bowl, add some celery chopped up, pepper, and onion powder, mix with mayo and use it as dip on crackers is our favorite way to eat them, besides just crackin' shells and eating them.

    Deb
     
  6. cowgirlone

    cowgirlone Well-Known Member

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    We call them crawdads too. They are pretty tasty, I don't know if they taste more like shrimp or crab or what, I guess they just taste like crawdads. :haha:

    We have several crawdad boils during the year, with shrimp, smoked sausage, corn on the cob, new potatoes, onions, etc.. They sure are tasty! I also like them in gumbo, and in crawfish bisque, and etoufee.

    We use a crawdad trap to catch them. We can catch about 300 in one night using the trap.

    I raise freshwater shrimp and use the crawdad trap to harvest them in the fall.
    Works pretty slick! :)



    Deb, I'm going to try your mayo mixture, sounds good!! :)
     
  7. I use a round open trap. Make a circle loop out of stiff wire into about a 15 inch diameter. Place some kind of a fish netting across and sew onto the loop. Make sure the netting is somewhat concaved as crawdad will swim off the sides if the netting is stretched flat. Now connect two wire handles up and over the trap connecting so that the two make a cross handle. Tie a line to where the handles make a cross. Place your bait (fish) on the center fastening it to the netting with a safety pin. This keeps the crawdads from running off with your bait. Now place a rock in the center with the bait and lower it into the water. Wait about 10 minutes and "Walla" you are now ready for a crawdad roast.

    I use 2 of them at a time. I place one out and then place the next one up or down stream a little ways. By the time I get the second one placed out it is time to check and empty the first one. I then replace the 1st one further on from the second one. By the time I get it replaced it is time to check and empty the second one. I keep repeating this until what I think is enough to take home. If you have a real good stream you can use this technique and fill a 5 gallon bucket in just a couple of hours. So be careful cause you really do need to leave some for seed. Also practice either culling females during mating season or wait till the second half of summer to harvest any. Around here mating season last from April through June.

    And finally. Enjoy! They are delicious.
     
  8. glenda

    glenda Well-Known Member

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  9. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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    Thanks everyone. I have a few 'secret' places absolutely loaded with them, so I guess I'll be spending a little time trapping and savouring. Gotta love free 'sea' food. :D
     
  10. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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  11. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    Sea food and also 'See' food. See food and eat it. :haha: :yeeha:
     
  12. jackie c

    jackie c Well-Known Member

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  13. busybee64

    busybee64 Member

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    Crawfish? Can't get enough of them!!!!! Love to catchem, love to eatem. Start when the season starts, and before I have my fill the seasons over.

    Boiled crawfish, crawfish etouffee, fried crawfish, crawfish pie YUMMMMMMMMM
     
  14. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    So how do you eat them,pull out the tail meat?

    BooBoo
     
  15. Hey the dipper trap on Rockpiles sight is something similar to what I use. I use to use the trapper style until I found out about the dipper type. Although I still use both but the dipper has become my favorite. When I take my daughters swimming I usually take a couple along and catch a mess while the girls swim.
     
  16. Kadiddylak

    Kadiddylak Member

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    Crayfish , as the cajuns would say in louisiana . I tried them once and didnt like them. Im going to give it another try next time im back in cajun land. They dont taste like shrimp and im sure of that. they tasted like mud to me. In the gulf of mexico we have bay shrimp and gulf shrimp you can tell the difference by the color . Gulf shrimp are orange color because of iodine in the ocean and bay are grey from muddy water. I have eating both and can tell the difference. Gulf is better. Bay taste like crawfish .its kinda odd that fish dont really taste that different between sea and lakes or rivers. Give it a try maybe you will like it.
     
  17. Kaddiddylak, your right about some of them not tasting good. I've only eaten cajun type crawdads a couple of times and I didn't like them either. Here where I live the crawdads come out of a clear spring creek and we also cook them different. We pull the heads off and the middle tail fin out which comes out the intestinal tract along with it. Then we blanch them in hot boiling water to remove any leeches and bugs. Then we place them in cast iron skillet heat up till all the water has steamed away. Once all the water is gone we pour salt and bacon grease over them and fry them for just a few minutes. We then shell them out and enjoy.
     
  18. DrippingSprings

    DrippingSprings In Remembrance

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    The bad flavor you are getting is because you arent purging them. When I was in high school in Beaumont Texas I worked on a crawfish farm. We would always put a couple bushel sacks of them in a small plastic kiddie pool and add salt to purge them and they were great. I have caught the wild variety here in North Bama and as long as they are purged properly they are as good as any I have ever purchased off of a actual crawfish farm. Besides yall aint doing it right. After you boil em in the flavored water you shuck the tail and then turn it wround and suck the head as the spice will accumalate where the tail was attached inside the body behind the head.