Crawdad mud mounds

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by soulsurvivor, Mar 27, 2006.

  1. soulsurvivor

    soulsurvivor Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The mounds are taking over about a half acre of our small property that borders a creek. We've lived here 25 years and never had this amount of destruction and have never felt a need to get rid of the crawdads. But for some reason they're going nuts this year, and quite early in the season too. So, does anyone have any advice on why this may be happening or how to slow or stop it? We have an outdoor cat that stays fat from catching the crawdads. But we don't want more cats. We're more worried that it looks like this part of our property is sinking. :croc:
     
  2. DixyDoodle

    DixyDoodle stranger than fiction

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    I wonder if maybe some breeds of ducks might eat them? I bet some duck people here could answer that. Of course, that would work only if you wanted ducks in your yard! :)

    DD
     

  3. copperkid3

    copperkid3 Well-Known Member

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    Down in Cajun country......you'd be extremely popular!!! Them thar little crawdads taste like lobster!!! Round up some neighbors for a hoe-down and harvest them.....GOOD EATING! ;)
    As far as the ducks......it you really want to "waste" them......might I suggest muscovys'? They will chase down and eat ANYTHING smaller than they are......including baby chicks or ducks......a little crawdad would be an appetizer for a hungry 'scovy.
     
  4. fantasymaker

    fantasymaker Well-Known Member

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    Buy a Crayfish trap and plan on dinner! Anything ya want will go away on its own!
     
  5. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    i would be eating those. make a basket out of chicken wire. kinda like a dish. the small ones go through and the big ones stay in the wire. just scoop around.

    ducks and geese would eat them. i would eat them and forget the ducks, lol.
     
  6. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    During part of their lifestyle, crawdads live in mud burrows. In a very wet year, their usual mud burrowing spot is flooded and so not to their tastes.

    So, they move uphill to where the mud is to their liking. We had some in our front yard, one year.
     
  7. woodspirit

    woodspirit Well-Known Member

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    Look up crawdads online and be sitting down when you see the prices. There is some really good eating there. Send all of them to me. I'll take whatever you want to get rid of.
     
  8. HiouchiDump

    HiouchiDump Well-Known Member

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    Any physical barrier should do the job. A concrete block wall near the water, about 2-3 feet deep and about six inches above ground would probably fix 'em. Landscaping fabric might work as well.

    What you really need are a few raccoons.
     
  9. leoaloha

    leoaloha Well-Known Member

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    They are getting ready to send a message to the mother ship\\\LOL


    L
     
  10. Yvonne's hubby

    Yvonne's hubby Murphy was an optimist ;) Staff Member

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    Ahhh yes, the crawdad condominiums! I have lots of those in my hayfields and pastures along the East Fork creek here in ky too. They are a lil different species than those of the cajun cullinary arts. I noticed quite a few early diggers this year too, I think maybe because we had such a mild winter and not a lot of water, my fields are usually way to wet to work this time of year and they are fine this time. I figure the lil buggers are drillin deeper to get down to the water level. most of mine are about 1 1/2 feet down at this point and thier lil towers are about 6 to 8 inches high. I will just run a drag over the pastures but mowing the hay this summer is going to be a pain fer sure, them lil mudpiles will plug the mower constantly. Dont worry bout your yard sinking, its the dry thats causing them to drill deeper in my estimation. :)
     
  11. DixyDoodle

    DixyDoodle stranger than fiction

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    Wouldn't eating the crayfish depend on the quality of the water they're living in? I'm not so sure I would want to eat something that was swimming in water that might be contaminated with something nasty. For instance, if you are downstream from a chemical plant, very large industrial farm, waste disposal site, etc. It might be a wise idea to have the water tested for toxins if you are near such places.

    I would consider this before eating anything! Crayfish can survive in some pretty yucky waters.

    DD
     
  12. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    i don't see how it could be any worse than eating oysters from the chesapeake bay, lol. just make sure it is not down stream from three mile island where my ex-brother inlaw caught a three eyed fish (true).
     
  13. TxCloverAngel

    TxCloverAngel Happiness is Homemade

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    One of my kids favorite pasttimes is to catch the buggers and throw em to the chickens...
    They go NUTS!!
    both the chickens AND my boys lol

    and theey make great fishing bait.
     
  14. soulsurvivor

    soulsurvivor Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yes, crayfish is the proper name and no, I wouldn't eat them either. Our creek is really more of a water run-off from all the surrounding farms. We're in a low valley and this creek begins about a half mile up the road from us. It is running low this year and I think the crayfish are hunting for some wetland. We've just never had em digging this close to the house before. At the back of our property we have a natural underground spring but it's under a small hill, a slope, and feeds into the creek. There's always water here is what I'm trying to say. The mounds are on a part of our property that we've always kept mowed and that is going to be another problem. This part of the land is also tiled, heavily, and we don't want to think about what these lil critters might be doing to that. If the critters would just head south about 1200 feet, they could do us a favor and break up our garden this year.
     
  15. FourDeuce

    FourDeuce Five of Seven Supporter

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    Sigh, I'm debating whether or not to share with ya'll some crawfish facts...you see before the rest of the country discovered Cajan fare crawfish could be purchased live for 35 cent per pound for 35-40 pound sacks....

    I'm thinking, if I just keep my mouth shut and let people eat crawfish who have gone into mud mode...people won't like 'em as much and the market with decline and prices will drop....

    But someone did mention that not all species of crawfish are the same, I might be too late.

    Hugs
    marlene
     
  16. Terri

    Terri Singletree & Weight Loss & Permaculture Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Fourdeuce, I have a question that you might be able to answer.

    When clams and such are gathered, they are often put in clean water for a day or two so that the mud inside the shells will be released.

    Does the same work with crawfish? I have had a muddy tasting crawfish, and one was really enough.
     
  17. Dahc

    Dahc Don't Tase me, bro!?!

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    They can be purged just like crab. Put them in a kiddy pool in the shade with about 4" of clean water covering them. It works in GA and they'll live for weeks so it's no problem if you can't cook them up the next day.
     
  18. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    ..............Yes , very true!! And , just remember that Teddy likes to Pee in the Bay off the side of the SS ChappaQuiddick .. :eek: ... :bouncy: , Eat a clam and turn into a Liberal !!! :nana: fordy... :sing:
     
  19. MarleneS

    MarleneS Well-Known Member

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    Terri - that's the part I wasn't going to tell; what they taste like if they are first purged.

    Hugs
    marlene