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Amanda
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Merry Christmas all! My family was given a 6 week old Black Lab yesterday for Christmas. I have tried putting Murray in the crate, and he yelps and whines and howls. How do I go about crate training him? He whines loud enough that he wakes my 13 month old son up. Help me out here, please!
 

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Ours was 8 weeks when we got him and the 1st night I slept on the floor with the door slightly open where I could pet him but he couldn't get out. Over time I moved farther away after a few nights I was on the couch then within about 2 weeks I moved back to my bedroom.
 

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6 weeks is too young to be away from littermates. He will cry and whine. My best suggestion is to send him back for at least a couple weeks until he is more emotionally ready to be separated.
 

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Animal Addict
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Some things to try:

An article of your clothing in there with him
A wind up clock (simulates the heart beat of mom)
A radio on a talk station

I agree he might have been weaned a bit too early, 8 weeks is usually the soonest they wean.

Also, I cannot offer further advice without a pic..:D
 

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Amanda
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
6 weeks is too young to be away from littermates. He will cry and whine. My best suggestion is to send him back for at least a couple weeks until he is more emotionally ready to be separated.
I can't send him back. The people were going to shoot him, because they were tired of puppies.

Some things to try:

An article of your clothing in there with him
A wind up clock (simulates the heart beat of mom)
A radio on a talk station

I agree he might have been weaned a bit too early, 8 weeks is usually the soonest they wean.

Also, I cannot offer further advice without a pic..:D
I understand that it is early to wean, but I am dealing with it. As for a pic, here are a couple, they aren't the best. I took them with in minutes of his arrival at our house.


 

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For a face that cute, I'd take a little whining! I hope all the puppies got good homes, that is so flipping sad.
 

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I can't send him back. The people were going to shoot him, because they were tired of puppies.

And some 'people' wonder why I like my animals better than most humans!

Thanks for saving the little fella. You're just going to have to tuff this one out. Try the crate in little increments during the day with a kong filled with peanut butter or some other yummy to chew on that will last quite a while. Make that crate a good place to be. Keep it short and sweet at first, but try to only let him out when he's not whining. That way he doesn't see it as a release after whining. But as a release after relaxing with his chewy.
 

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Ok, first recognize that he is an infant, and we treat infants differently then children, and children differently from teens.

Since he is an infant, he NEEDS to feel safe and loved. In a perfect world, his momma and littermates would be taking care of that, but it isn't, so you have to.

Put the crate in your bedroom, next to your bed. Give him something nice and warm and firm that smells like you, like a dirty sweatshirt all balled up and tied with the arms. Be prepared to just sleep with your arm hanging off the side of the bed for a couple of nights, with your fingers stuck through the crate and to wake up a couple of times to talk to him. Don't turn on the light or take him out of the crate, just talk to him in a quiet, calm voice to let him know he is Not all alone and that he is cared for.

In a few days, you will be able to sleep without your fingers in the crate. In a few more, you can begin to move the crate inch by inch away from the side of the bed to wherever you want it. (the sweatshirt will be a loss, lol) Just take it nice and slow, step by step. There is no need to begin at the end. There will be plenty of time to teach him big, tough dogs sleep in the kitchen (or wherever) - Six week old puppies are still learning that people are nice, food needs chewed but not everything in the world is for putting in mouths and that you shouldn't pee on carpet. That's plenty, he can learn to sleep all by himself all alone in the big, scary world in a couple of weeks. Right now the most important thing you can teach hhim is that when the world seems big and scary - he can count on you. In a couple of years, he'll return the favor.
 

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Dogs that were removed from their litter too young (and six weeks is way too young, especially for a large breed) can be expected to have some real problems: inability to housebreak, separation anxiety, inability to get along with other dogs, difficulty with training,... If the original owner does not want to bother with puppies, that's not your problem.

Right now, your puppy is learning bite inhibition. Puppy bites his brother's ear too hard, the brother yelps in a high pitched tone and runs away- game ended. Since your puppy's brother is, well, your 13 month old son, guess who he is going to learn bite inhibition on?
 

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I have to agree with Otter's post.
Get him calm in his new enviroment, and build trust then move onto real training.
It will be worth it in the end, we have a choc lab, who is my best friend, but she was just a little whiny pup too when we first got her, and I remember sleeping (ok, laying, no sleep)on the floor with her the first night. Then she moved to the crate.
Good luck, you will have a great family dog in the end.
 

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Six years ago an acquaintance, (actually I had only met her twice) brought a puppy to me at work. It was only six weeks old but she said that someone had dumped the mother dog off at her house and it had pups and now she was tired of having them around and she had already got rid of the mother. It was a very tiny puppy about the size of a beenie baby (she only weighs four pounds now) and fit in the palm of my hand. I knew she had to be kennel trained, I was so afraid she would be stepped on in the middle of the night cause shes black and tiny.
My dad raised hunting dogs and always kennel trained his dogs. So I did what he would do with a new pup. I got one of those wind up clocks and put it in with her at night and covered the kennel so she couldn't see us. I put her in for short amounts of time during the day and gave her a small, very small treat when going in(so she would associate it with something good). Ignored the whinning, and as soon as you take them out they go straight outside or to your pad to go to the bathroom. It should only take a short while to accomplish this, the trick is, at night once it's in the kennel, leave it alone, don't make it worse by checking on it or talking to it. If you take it to the bathroom before its kenneled it should be fine, at least for a couple of hours. If it wakes you up after some time take it out to pee and put it back. If the whinning really starts to bother you, move the kennel to the garage or somewhere where you won't hear it. Trust me it will be fine:). You have to be consistent and do it every night. And I should add, do not put food or water in with it(unless its a large metel cage with room to walk around), it will spill the water and get wet and eating will only make it poop in the kennel. Trust me, It will be fine till the morning.

We adopted a new 3 month old puppy on Monday and he only whined for about 1 minute in his kennel the first night(I didn't even have to use the clock) and he has been fine ever since.
So far he hasn't even had one accident in the house and I think that kennel training was a huge part of housebreaking for him as with my other dog.

I thought for sure that Ziggy, the new puppy was going to be difficult to train as his previous owners kept him outside and he had been at the pound for a few weeks. Poor guy was so skinny he was shivering all the time.

He's a big hit here, the cats walked right up to him and rubbed noses. My older dog is ok with him, she just doesn't want him laying on her, might squish her:).

Sorry for the rant, hope all goes well for you and the training and congrat's on your new puppy!
 

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When I brought home my 8 week old puppy 3 years ago, I too knew I would crate train him. However, the crate would not/could not be in our bedroom, but in the dining room at the other end of the house. The first week or two maybe we had that issue of the noise and I also have small children that needed to sleep. My solution was to sleep puppy in a laundry basket on the floor by my bed where I could hang my hand into it to hush puppy and yet I was still semi-comfortable. As he got big enough to jump out of the basket, we then transitioned to the crate and it was much easier.

Good luck with your little one!
 

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kygreendream
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We Got A New Puppy For Christmas Also. Talk About Mass Confusion For Us And The Poor Puppy. He Is Great Dane/black Lab Mix. The Sweetest Thing In The World....he Hates His Crate. I Think He Was Separated Way Too Early. He Will Be 3mth Old 1/10/09 He Was Born 10/10/08. We Have Had Him 3 Wks,and The Lady Who We Got Him From Had Him For A Week. He Likes Sleeping W/ Old Ds. So Crating Is Hard. Oh He Also Likes To Eat Crayons. I Try Keeping Them Up But Keep Finding Them In His Stool .... Please Give Some Good Advise To All Puppy Owners. I Really Want To Try To Hb Him
 

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My dog has an exercise pen (so called) which is a little bigger than a crate. I give him a treat when I put him in there. Now he knows the routine. I open the treat jar and say 'crate' and he bounds over to it and sits there to wait for me.
 

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All I know is this has been the easiestpuppy I have ever kennel trained or housebroke. Like I said before, aside from the one minute of whinning the first night he's already trained. I even put him in the kennel when we leave the house and he's been fine. No accidents in the kennel, on the floor or carpet. I keep waiting for him to start howling, but nothing. He really is a good boy. He doesn't even bark when the others bark, YEA!!!

Oh, he did growl at the vet tech and the vet when we went for his check up on Tuesday. I think he thought he was going back to the pound, all the smells and the recent neutering got him a little scared. Not to mention the vet was ruff with him(she had him by the throat, you could hear him trying to swallow)I was trying to figure out what that was all about and it really upset my son, I mean he is only 3 months and 9lbs, give a guy a break:) Don't think we will be using that vet again. Guess he knew he was going to be man handled cause he's never growled before, heck like I said he doesn't even bark, and he gets along with the other dog and cats. Just a total love machine, giving lots of kisses.
 

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Poor little guy. Why can't people like the ones you got him from be shot, instead of the innocent puppies?

As stated, he is too young to be away from mom and littermates, but if Mom is gone and you can't take puppy back, you don't have any choice except to deal with it.

Quick question- have you got other dogs in the house that could sleep with Pup for a few nights? Without killing him, lol? Last winter we got an 8 week old pup. At the time we were fostering a 15 week old Cockapoo puppy. I didn't plan to do this, but when I went to put the new puppy to bed the first night I decided on the spur of the moment to let the two puppies share a crate- they had bonded instantly when I got home with the new one. That worked out beautifully- never heard a single peep out of either one of them. By the time the Cockapoo got adopted 2 weeks later the new pup was happy in the crate by himself.

If you can't provide a crate buddy for him, try putting the crate on a chair next to the bed, as someone else suggested. You could also try a clock, and/or a hot water bottle or rice pack for him to snuggle with. It isn't going to be easy or fun, but hopefully he will adjust quickly. Might also help if you can make sure he is good and tired at bedtime and whenever you are putting him in the crate.

He's an awfully cute little guy- good luck with him.
 

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This may sound weird, but we did a rescue of a border collie. Sweet little thing, but after we got him home he was a bit on the wild side. Constant bitting and such. I did some reading and discovered he was treating my DS as his littermate and that was all the biting and craziness. The article said to behave as the mama dog would and growl to say you are doing wrong and if he ignored, raise it to a sharp high pitch sound and even that snapping, growling weird sound a mama dog will make. As odd as it was, when he misbehaved I did that and before long he come to think of me as Mama dog and did just what I said and if he was playing rough with us, all I had to do was a little growl at him and he stopped cold. I then converted it from the growl to no and he is fine. He is 18 months old now, crate trained and becoming well behaved. Of course a puppy is a puppy is a puppy but I haven't had to growl at him since he was a couple months old. It worked well.
 

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Puppies sharing a crate is fine, but an adult or older pup and a young pup sharing a crate is a recipe for disaster as the older pup/dog may try to put pup in his place too agressively and being so close, neither one has the space to get away.
 
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