cows milk vs. supplement

Discussion in 'Goats' started by BeaTX, Dec 8, 2005.

  1. BeaTX

    BeaTX Member

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    I was given a day old baby goat this afternoon, and I was told by my neighbor that you could give them whole cows milk, but my cousin that raises goats says that he always uses a powdered supplement. I called the farm store near here about the supplement and they said what they had was fairly expensive, so I'm just wandering if it's necessary.
    Thanks for any help.
    ~Bridgett
     
  2. Goat Freak

    Goat Freak Slave To Many Animals

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  3. Delinda

    Delinda Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yes you can feed the kid whole cows milk, many people do. I prefer to use the Purina milk replacer for kids, but this is just my preferance. It is around $15. for a 8lb. bag, and you will use quite a few bags of it before the kid is weaned. If you have access to cows milk I would just use it.
     
  4. homebirtha

    homebirtha Well-Known Member

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    Most experienced goat folks who I have discussed this with all recommend cow's milk over the milk replacer. Many have had problems with scours on the milk replacer. The best thing you can give them is goats milk. Is there a goat farm near you that might sell you some. Just make sure you pasturize it first.
     
  5. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If I can't get goat milk, or if I think it might carry CAE(I don't like to pasturize if I can help it)I choose to feed whole, raw cows milk to my bottle babies. They grow wonderfully, no scours, no problems. I have even started kids out on Jersey colostrum and milk and they did just fine. Of course, the milk needs to be from a healthy cow. But I certainly reccomend raw cows milk instead of replacer if you can get it. I hate replacer for calves or goats. It just can't beat the real thing.........
     
  6. Jillis

    Jillis Well-Known Member

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    I have very limited experience, but I will tell you what I am discovering by trial and error with my 10 new babies.
    When I first got them, the dairy goat owner recommended that I feed them raw cow's milk if I could get it. I live in dairy country, there are several cow dairys all over the place. But only one that I KNEW was clean. They drink from the bulk tank, that's how clean it is. But it is organic milk, and cost $4.00 per gallon! I got the first 5 gallons there. It was soooo rich that it gve them, not the scours, but diarrhea from change of diet. So I started mixing it with cow's milk from the store.
    Then I fed them just the whole cow's milk from the store. The cheapest I can get that (here in dairy country!) is $2.79 a gallon! So it was costing me a LOT to feed these babies! They were consuming about 3 gallons a day, altogether! When I told the guy I got them from what I was feeding them, he then suggested the lamb and kid milk replacer would have more of the nutrition that baby goats specifically need, because the milk in the stores has been stripped and so forth, it is like white water with some nutrients in it, like white bread ot white rice. (Anybody else remember Melanie's song, the one about "I don't eat animals, and they don't eat me"---referring to white food products: "Oh, white could be beautiful, but mostly it's not!")

    Soooo, I bought the lamb and kid milk replacer, it even has colostrum in it. I got a 25 lb. bag of Advance, I get it for $38.00. It smells like the whey protein drink my dh and ds drink. It is FAR cheaper than the whole cow's milk I was buying from the store. At first, I mixed it with the cow's milk so they wouldn't have too big a change in their diet. A few still got diarrhea, but some of that might have been a part of the cold they all got. It wasn't drastic diarrhea either. I just gave the ones with diarrhea electrolytes in warm water, and it never got very bad.
    They are all thriving, fat, sassy, active with beautiful-looking fur on the milk replacer. And it costs me half what the store bought milk did.
    Goat's milk would probably be even more expensive than the organic cow's milk for sure. I suppose it depends on how many you are raising.
    I can't wait until my own goats have babies. Then I will give them goat's milk, of course.
    I hope that helps!
    Blessings, Jillis!
     
  7. BeaTX

    BeaTX Member

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    Thanks for the help everybody. He's looking good right now. Wasn't too sure when we brought him home. But he's standing and starting to try to get around a bit. He has a bit of yellowish diarrhea, but he just drank the last of his colostrum this morning. Is that normal, kind of like with human babies? I don't mean to sound stupid I've just never dealt with a kid this small without the mother. Thanks again.
    Bridgett
     
  8. ozark_jewels

    ozark_jewels Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yes, the slightly runny poops is normal for a kid on colostrum. It varies by kid, some have firm colostrum poops, some have the runny stuff that clumps on their butt. I would wipe his butt and keep it clean. His poops should firm up soon, if not, you may have a problem. Good luck!