Cow Steaks

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by Jena, Sep 6, 2004.

  1. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    My husband just got done pulling a dead calf from a 3-4 year old cow. She also lost her calf last year (first calf, gave her another chance). I'm not going to feed her another year (she was late breeding back too).

    I needed to get another cow made up into hamburger anyways, so there she is. Mike said that he had a 4 year old cow slaughtered and was surprised at how good the meat was. I'm thinking of taking the steaks from this girl and grinding the rest, but I sure don't want to sell anyone any shoe leather.

    I would definitely try the steaks before I sold them, but I don't want to get stuck with shoe leather either.

    What do you all think? Do you think it's worth a try? Do you think the processor could make a judgement call once he sees the carcass?

    Thanks

    Jena
     
  2. Kathryn L.Holck

    Kathryn L.Holck Active Member

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    Jena

    Years ago when I was a kid, Mom and Dad were on a trip. My oldest bro was doing chores and hit Dad's best milker with the tractor. Her back leg was broken and needless to say became a main staple at our table of 8 kids and an uncle and 2 parents. Mom did not have a freezer but rented space at a nearby locker. I do remember Mom canning lots of meat and it was the best there was. So, if the steaks are tough, just bake them slowly or grind them yourself or can them.

    If you fatten her up for a month, you will get some new marbleing on her which will make the steaks more tender.

    A friend told me once, concerning hogs, once a sow farrowed for the last time, he would fatten her up for slaughter and it was the best tasting pork he had.

    Perhaps a cow fattened up would taste great and be tender too.
     

  3. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    My Indiana Grandfather, who milked a dairy herd for around 40 years, used to say the beef wasn't beef until it was 4 years old then butchered and hung for about 6 weeks.

    Until fairly recent times steers were used as oxen until they were 10 years old and then butchered for beef while they were still in good shape. That practice goes back a couple of thousand years.

    I've eaten steaks off an old cow and found them to be very good, but everyone has their own ideas and preconceived notions.

    I would say that tender meat is more the result of feed and careful handling when butchering and working up the meat than age.
     
  4. Wanda

    Wanda Well-Known Member

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    Jena
    The steaks from the Lim cow were cubed(tenderized) :) The only prob that I found was there was a layer almost like a rind, between the meat and the fat layer. It was the least obvious on the chuck and the most obvious on the loin and round.I never tried any steaks that were bone in but I don't think I would have been satisfied, of course I am spoiled and she was grass fed! I would strip the loins and cut them boneless''' all ribeyes'' and if there is not enough marbeling just have him run them thru the cuber! They should be very good whichever way you decide but if they were going to customers I would sell them a cubed steak that would be the best they ever had :D As soon as you hang this cow on the rail you should be able to tell the finish. I would think about keeping some roasts from the chuck if you have the market as they were very flavorful. I was checking cows yesterday and noticed the briskets on the cows look like fat cattle!!!! This has been a good grass year and the cows and calves are showing a lot of ''finish''. Hope this helps with your prob.
    Mr. Wanda
    Mike
     
  5. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    In France most slaughter cows are 3 years or older. I agree you should corn feed her for a bit and then have her processed like a steer. If the large cuts turn out too tough, make them into stew meat.

    A bit factor in 'good tasting beef' is cooking. Feedlot cattle are meant for fast grilling. Grass-fed cattle need to be slow cooked.

    When we were on the dairy farms in WI, my older siblings said the only beef we ever had came from an old milker with one exception. One cow went in the milk line after her first calf. She was a kicker. After about a week of this one day Dad went to the tool crib, brought back a sledge hammer and killed her in the stancion. He then continued milking. After the cows were turned out she was pulled out with a tractor and processed.

    Ken Scharabok
     
  6. Wanda

    Wanda Well-Known Member

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    Jena
    I thought about your cow last night when I had supper :eek: I found a pkg. of ''tenderloin'' from the cow I butchered and they were perfect!!!! Is your cow dried up enough to go to slaughter yet?
    Mr. Wanda
    Mike
     
  7. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    She went Monday. She is hanging as we speak. I'm going to get the tenderloin for sure and the processor is going to take a look at the rest and make a decision based on how it looks.

    I'll try some as soon as I get her back.

    Jena
     
  8. blanknoone

    blanknoone Member

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    Jena, knowing you do poultry as well, it is kind of like the difference between a broiler and a stew hen. A lot of it has to do with the cooking method...slow moist heat will be best. My limited experience and personal experience is that an older cows and stew hens are the best....but they have to be slow cooked with moist heat. In other words, I wouldn't bother with the steaks, but take every roast I can...and that includes almost everything that is normally steaked.
     
  9. wr

    wr Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Jena, I'm very sure you'll find she's just fine, for years we've eaten cow (the ones that come in open in the fall or has some other shortcoming) and I've never found them tough or bad tasting. The only thing I can tell you is that a true meat critic can tell the cow from steer by the distribution of fat.
     
  10. Jena

    Jena Well-Known Member

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    You know...I sold a few of those steaks, then my daughter cooked some rib-eyes. It was like eating shoe leather...old shoe leather!

    I called the customers who bought them to see if they had any problems and to offer them a refund. They all loved them and said no problem.

    It may have been the cook :)

    Jena
     
  11. Wanda

    Wanda Well-Known Member

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    Jena
    How long did she hang in the cooler before she was cut up? I find if they hang 7-10 days it does a lot of good! How did the burger turn out? That should be good enough to have a lot of people calling back!!! When people taste GOOD burger they are truly amazed. The ribeyes would have to be cooked with care since they do not have as much intermuscular fat. If cooked slow with moist heat they should be awsome, flavor wise!
    Mr. Wanda
    Mike