Court Lifts Injunction Blocking Cattle From Canada

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Swampthing, Jul 15, 2005.

  1. Swampthing

    Swampthing Well-Known Member

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    Bye Bye ranchers! The USDA only cares about the packers!

    Court Lifts Injunction Blocking Cattle From Canada

    July 14 (Bloomberg) -- A federal appeals court cleared the way for Canadian cattle to be shipped to slaughterhouses in the U.S., ending a two-year ban, after the government argued the animals don't pose a threat to humans from mad-cow disease.

    A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals lifted an injunction that had been blocking a Department of Agriculture plan to allow cattle from Canada, which has had four cases of mad-cow disease, to be sold in the U.S. after being banned since May 2003.

    Canadian cattle imports will ease a shortage of slaughter- ready animals that has hurt profits at Tyson Foods Inc., Cargill Inc. and Swift & Co., the three largest U.S. beef packers. Canada normally supplies about 5 percent of the 35 million animals slaughtered each year by the U.S. beef industry.

    ``This is great news for meatpackers,'' said Tim Ramey, an analyst with D.A. Davidson & Co. in Lake Oswego, Oregon, in an e- mail. Ramey said the added cattle supply will help increase profit margins for meatpackers such as Tyson. Ramey reiterated a ``buy'' rating on Tyson after the court decision.

    The USDA ``is already in contact with the Canadian Food Inspection Agency to prepare to certify cattle for shipment,'' said U.S. Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns in a statement.

    Order `Effective Immediately'

    The court said in a two-page order that the injunction blocking a U.S. plan to lift the ban ``must be reversed'' and said it would issue an opinion later giving its reasons. The court's order is ``effective immediately,'' the judges said.

    A federal judge had issued the injunction at the request of the Ranchers-Cattlemen Action Legal Fund, a Montana-based group representing 18,000 ranchers and feedlot owners. The group, known as R-CALF, argued that opening the border to Canadian cattle would increase uncertainty about the safety of U.S. beef and encourage other countries to shun the meat.

    ``We are disappointed in today's ruling,'' said Bill Bullard, R-CALF's chief executive. ``The 9th Circuit gave no reasons for their action, so there isn't much we can do until we see those reasons.''

    The group hasn't considered its legal options, including asking a larger group of 9th Circuit judges to review today's ruling, said Shae Dodson, an R-CALF spokeswoman, in a telephone interview.

    U.S. District Court Judge Richard Cebull in Billings, Montana, who issued the preliminary injunction in March blocking the USDA from lifting the ban, has scheduled a July 27 hearing on the R-CALF lawsuit.

    `Premature and Unjustified'

    R-CALF said in a statement today that it's confident it will be able to demonstrate in Cebull's court that the USDA's actions are ``premature and unjustified.''

    Cattle futures aren't likely to fall tomorrow as traders have already anticipated larger cattle supplies, said Donald Selkin, director of equity research with Joseph Stevens & Co. in New York.

    ``The decline over the past couple weeks has already discounted this ruling,'' said Selkin, who added that it will take some time before Canadian producers are ready to ship animals across the border in large numbers.

    Futures

    Cattle futures for August delivery fell 0.175 cent to 78.95 cents a pound today on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. Futures have dropped 3.9 percent since June 10, when the USDA said it may have found a new case of mad-cow disease. The case was confirmed June 24.

    The government had planned to allow Canada to resume shipping cattle less than 30 months old and bone-in beef from younger animals on March 7. The U.S. has allowed imports of boneless beef from Canadian cattle under 30 months of age since August 2003. Cattle that young are thought to be at the lowest risk for mad-cow disease.

    Large numbers of cattle from Canada won't be shipped south until the U.S. and Canada agree on procedures, including how to document an animal's age, said Bernard Etzinger, a spokesman for the Canadian Embassy in Washington. ``There are a lot of certifications that are required,'' he said.

    `Minimal Risk'

    In arguing against the injunction, the USDA, Tyson and meat industry groups had argued that Canada's cattle posed a ``minimal risk'' of spreading mad-cow disease in the U.S.

    ``This is good news not just for Canadian cattle producers but for those sectors of the U.S. beef industry that have been economically devastated by the disruption in trade,'' said Stan Eby, president of the Canadian Cattlemen's Association, in an e- mailed statement.

    Opening the border on March 7, as the USDA had planned, would have allowed more than 1 million cattle into the U.S. from Canada this year, the agency estimated. About 10.8 million head of cattle were being fattened for slaughter in feedlots in the 17 major U.S. cattle-producing states on June 1, down from 11.3 million on Jan. 1, according to the government.

    The U.S. has lost about 7,800 beef packing industry jobs as a result of the cattle embargo, American Meat Institute President Patrick Boyle said today in Ottawa. The Washington, D.C.-based AMI represents Tyson Foods and other large meatpackers.

    Earlier this year, both Tyson Foods and Cargill Inc.'s Cargill Meat Solutions, the two largest U.S. beef packers, announced plans to expand beef processing in Canada, to take advantage of lower processing costs.

    Cheaper in Canada

    The USDA, in an economic analysis released in December, said the cattle ban had created a situation where Canadian meatpackers had been able to buy cows for as little as 17 cents a pound and sell the processed beef in the U.S. for about $1.23 a pound, while U.S. packers were buying similar animals at 55 cents a pound.

    Mad-cow disease is a brain-wasting livestock illness that scientists say is spread in cattle by tainted animal feed. It has a rare but fatal human variant that has been blamed for the deaths of 150 people in the U.K., where it was first reported in the 1980s.

    The U.S. imposed its ban on cattle from Canada in May 2003 after the first Canadian case of mad-cow disease, which is clinically known as bovine spongiform encephalopathy, or BSE. Since then, three other animals born in Canada were diagnosed with BSE, including the cow found in Washington state in December 2003, which prompted dozens of nations to ban U.S. beef. The U.S. confirmed its first native-born BSE case last month.

    The case is Ranchers-Cattlemen Action Legal Fund v U.S. Department of Agriculture, 05-35264, 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, San Francisco.



    http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000103&sid=abqsihkz8j4o
     
  2. Swampthing

    Swampthing Well-Known Member

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  3. Snowdancer

    Snowdancer Well-Known Member

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    Do we ship our cattle to other countries?

    If we do ship out cattle to other countries, then I guess allowing others to ship in is fair. A truly slippery slope if we only want to ship ours everywhere as being good business but refuse to accept that other countries are trying to stay in business too.

    What about no imports OR exports-we eat what we grow, we grow what we need. Would that help out the farmers?? I've never asked for anyone's opinion on that idea before but that may solve the problem. :confused:
     
  4. Swampthing

    Swampthing Well-Known Member

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    Assuming it was a level playing field it would be one thing, but it's not. Why would a packer buy US feeder cattle @.60/lb when they could buy it in Canada for .17? Land in SA is $100/acre, antibiotics that cost .60/dose here cost .10 there. They have a year round growing season. With CAFTA being pushed through that price per pound drops to practically nothing. At least with US cattle we have the psuedo-security of USDA inspections. The USDA does test for BSE. Not so in these other countries. They don't have BSE because they don't look for it. Foot and Mouth is in every country below the Panama Canal, it will be here soon.

    The dept. of Agriculture couldn't care less about Family Farmers and Ranchers...or the American Consumer.
     
  5. Snowdancer

    Snowdancer Well-Known Member

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    What about the idea of only using or selling what is US grown-no imports or exports-wouldn't that keep the supply and demand even after a short adjustment period and bring prices into line?

    Not arguing, just wondering why we would export our cattle and then import others.
     
  6. bumpus

    bumpus Well-Known Member

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    The name of the game is supply and demand, they are not in the business of feeding people with beef products. They are in business to make money with the most profit to keep in their pockets. Selling beef products is the name of the game.

    They by it cheep from places like Mexico, Canada, etc. and they sell some to countries that will pay more than the U. S. people will pay.

    This way they can buy cheep and sell high. More profit - very simple.

    OH by the way look for cattle prices at the sales to start falling down to lower prices now that the supply will greater.

    Prices are never brought in line to please the consumer ! ! !

    They control the market not ( us ) the public ! ! !

    bumpus
     
  7. Swampthing

    Swampthing Well-Known Member

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    Not arguing, just wondering why we would export our cattle and then import others.

    Pretty soon we won't have ANY livestock to export. International Agribusiness owns the USDA lock stock and barrel.

    from the link above

    In the US, between 1950 and 1999, the number of farms decreased by 64 percent to less than two million, and farm population has declined to less than 2 percent. Ninety percent of agricultural output is produced by only 522 000 farms [5]. Canadian statistics similarly reveal that farm numbers have decreased by 10 percent between the 1996 census and 2001; there were less than 247 000 farms in the country in 2001 [6].

    This relentless process of consolidation drives the heart out of the countryside, causing social and economic decay, and replaces it with an intensive industry that cares nothing about plant or animal diversity, quality or compassion in farming, but is solely interested in bringing down prices [1,7].

    ‘Free trade’ policies made by and for the rich countries of the North not only destroy the livelihood of small-farmers at home, they also encourage the dumping of subsidized goods (selling at less than the cost of production) from the North onto the markets of the poor South, distorting local markets, and leaving farmers in developing countries also unable to compete [1, 7, 8].
     
  8. wr

    wr Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Swampthing, I'm not sure where you get your facts but Canada does test for BSE and our testing his highly effective. Feeder cattle are not selling for .17/lb, crock cows and balogna bulls are but they really aren't worth anything and way too old to cross into the US in boxes on the hoof. Good cows are still selling for for fair price but not outstanding. I'm unclear on how you arrived at your value for meds but I do think you are out on that as well. Are you also aware that a lot of the cattle owned up here are actually owned by Americans and our two main slaughter houses (in Alberta) are totaly American owned? Are you also aware that the kingpin of R-CALF invested a huge sum of money in Canadian cattle after BSE was discovered up here? His original thought was that the border would reopen soon and he'd make a killing on his original investment. Were you also aware that large numbers of American cattle have come into Canada over the years? It isn't a one way street. Are you also aware that the loss of those Canadian cattle have put a lot of US citizens out of work as slaughter plants have been closing down? I can also assure you that if you have found one case of BSE, you can expect to find more.
     
  9. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    It's high time the border was reopened for cattle. Some of the lastest government dealings with Canada have been more about politics over Iraq than about health and economics down here. Closing the Canadian border to any kind of legal trade hurt's US citizen as much or more than the Canadian.

    I hope the court ruling holds. It can only help the Canadian beef producer, and bring some degree of normalcy to the Us beef market. When a US dairy farmer will look a person straight in the eye and ask $3 a pound for day old Jersey bull calves I'd say we're having a rationality problem.
     
  10. Snowdancer

    Snowdancer Well-Known Member

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    Is that how much they're going for now?? Wow; when we bought ours back in the mid 80's they were $25 to $30 at 5 days old from a Grade A dairy!

    Holsteins were even cheaper!!
     
  11. Swampthing

    Swampthing Well-Known Member

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    Sorry WR these floks don't support your statement

    http://www.r-calfusa.com/BSE/Roundtable remarks.pdf

    http://www.r-calfusa.com/BSE/053105 11 page Position Paper.pdf

    and your attempt to discredit r-calf without evidence is falling on deaf ears.

    The discovery of a BSE-infected cow of Canadian origin in the United States caused dozens of countries to close their borders to U.S. meat
    and imposed many millions of dollars of losses on the U.S. livestock
    industry. Now imports from Canada are allowed back in and we won't even have contry of origin lableing.

    Are you saying Canada is BSE free?
     
  12. Swampthing

    Swampthing Well-Known Member

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    Ya'll are being short-sighted, niave and gullible.

    The problem isn't just Canada, it's agricultural imports from the rest of the planet! International Agribusiness (which is married to the USDA) is using Canada and Cafta to shove .50/lb hamburger meat from feeder cattle that were fattened up on gm corn and laced with antibiotics outlawed here down our throats! Food-bourne pathogens, disease, and parasites from the 3rd world we only read about, our children and grand-kids will live with.

    All the livestock will be raised somewhere else.

    The prices will be lower but at what cost?

    This isn't good for American Ranchers framers or the consumer.
     
  13. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    If the truth were know we the United States export large quanities of Beef and Pork to Canada and Old Mexico ever day of the week.Figure a average load at 40'000# of beef or pork and multiply that by about 200 loads per day to each of those two countries times 7 days I am not counting the exports to China and Japan, and other pacific rim countries that get over 200 loads per week each , now figure the live weight of the animal in question. and the packers ,are shipping a huge amount I mean Mega Tons per day ,And Canada and Mexico Imports are just a drop in the bucket, Now figure in breeding Stock sales to Say Sweden and Denmark of certain breeds.Also Australia and new Zealand get large amounts of breeders from the United States.I know live cattle sales are just less than 10% of the total sales every year. This is just a F Y I .
     
  14. wr

    wr Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Of course we have BSE and we are likely going to find more, so is the US because there are cattle alive that predate the current feed regulations and morons that feel they all sorts of alternative feeds to cattle. I do recall that the cow found to have BSE in Washington originated from Canada and crossed into the US at a fairly young age but I've also seen no proof of where she became infected and I do not recall anyone with your labs suggesting anything either way. Did you also know that one of the cows in Alberta found to be infected was born out of our country? What is your ag background? Now, if I'm following your train of thought correctly, you would like none of our livestock (dead or alive) to cross the border but in order for your farmers and ranchers to stay viable, you would like it very much if we continue to ship as much oil and gas as possible at a price less than other countries are willing to pay or would you rather pick that up at home too? My point is that people like yourself are very short sighted, you only want trade with other countries on your own terms but forget the big picture.
     
  15. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    i'm in canada too. our local feeder price is.94-105 a pound ,this is the catagory that is alowed into the us. cull dairy cows run at .17 cents ,these are not allowed to cross the border at all. our country lacks slaugther capacity. even when our cows were band and we had a glut of slaughter cattle we still imported beef to meet cosumer demand . part of that was american beef heading north . before the ban canada imported feeder cattle from the us, with the ban this trade dryed up .dairy cows, buffalo, cervids, sheep and goats as well as cattle over thirty months are still band . as wr said the beefer that started all this was owned by an american and its origin was never known . this is not the first time that the border has been shut down ,first i can recall was 73 when it was closed due too tb and brucelosis both now wiped out here .at that time we had a tracking system that allowed all animals to be tracked ,now there is an even better tracking system in place .
     
  16. Swampthing

    Swampthing Well-Known Member

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    That's the point I have been making all day. This is exactly why I feel Canadian beef should stay in Canada. Are the Japanese buying it?

    Stick to facts, a Canadians recollections are suspect in this arguement.

    You are supporting my point. I don't want beef from anywhere else in the world to be sold in the US! We have always had the highest inspection standards and now we are lowering them to meet the demands of CAFTA! Beef from Brazil will be sitting there in the grocers meat shelf right next to American beef and no country of origin label! Consumers think it's the same, it's not.

    Not that it's any of yor business--7700 acre ancestorial farm in Mississippi Delta, Tippo to be exact. Soybeans, corn, Cotten, milo. Lost due to Jimmy Carter. Grew tobacco here in Kentucky for a number of years, Bill Clinton took that away. I currently keep 56 head downstate.

    BUT I EAT!

    One doesn't have to be shot to know it's no something you want.

    Why are you selling us that oil and gas cheaper than you can get on the world markets? It's because of NAFTA. Now I rant and rave about CAFTA and your crying about how NAFTA has shafted your oil and gas exports? Let me let you in on a little secret...there's a provision under the oil and gas section of NAFTA that increases the amount of oil and gas exported year over year to America...even if Canadians have to do without.


    Yes I am. I want the highest quality food for my family, if it's not then I want it labeled accordingly.

    The big picture is if Canada had been testing for BSE all along and could certify their herd to be BSE free in a meaningful way this all would be a moot point, right?
     
  17. wr

    wr Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    The even bigger point is that the latest case of BSE in the US is homegrown so can't be blamed on Canada. It did not originate in Canada or any other country.

    Did I ever say that I was upset about oil and gas revenues? Not once, I asked you simply why you would expect to take selectively from a country simply in order to keep costs for your citizens down. My statement indicates nothing about acheiving greater money for the same product at all. Where can you find that I did indicate we should get greater $ for product.

    You meat is only as safe as your inspectors, if you want to export to Japan, for example, they require 100% testing, not just testing on ill cattle. In testing only ill cattle, do you feel your testing is effective? Do you realize or know that there is an incubation time before symptoms and do you realize that Japan stated that in using your (American) testing techniques they would have found less than half of the infected animals? The Japanese WILL buy Canadian and US beef ONLY if we agree to 100% testing. Are you also aware that the US and Canada had the same feeding techniques and incorporated the new feed regulations at exactly the same time thus allowing a certain number of older cows that very well could be infected.

    I'm sorry you feel that my recollections could be flawed, a small herd of cattle came from England from a herd found to have BSE, ALL were destroyed (fact not recollection) and one of the cows found infected in Alberta was in FACT born in the US but an animal can be infected at any point in their life so you don't hear us carrying on an whining like infants about who MIGHT have made our life difficult. As for the cow in Washington, what FACTS do you have that I don't have. She was born in Canada, immigrated to the US as a heifer and turned up as an infected cow at approx. 9 years old. THat's a lot of living and it could have easily occured on either side of the border based on FACTS, being the lax feed regulations during her early years that were legal on BOTH sides of the border.

    The real big picture is far simpler than you make it, if Canada AND the US had 100% testing, this whole matter would be a moot point, we already have processing plants in place that are readying to ship to Japan based on that little detail that people like you forget. It isn't the BSE that has Japan bugged, it's the poor quality testing. Ask any American cattleman or scientist and the will tell you that where there's one case, there is surely more cases of BSE to be found. You can either work diligently to prove you don't have it or work diligently to prove you're doing something about it.

    Again, please explain how killing every animal in Canada to prove the absence of BSE will help the US in any way. This last case is your very own, you could have worked around the cow found in Washington, as we did the cows from England but once you find you are the country of origin of even one case, the world changes. I also ask you why you would worry about Japan, you state that you want no trade either way, just home grown feeding home.
     
  18. YuccaFlatsRanch

    YuccaFlatsRanch Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I sure am glad I just bought a beautiful 4 yr old Simmental Cow/Calf pair and an extra 5 mos old calf. These coupled with my sheep (Cal Reds), rabbits, chickens and local deer make me just about completely independent of the USDA meat process all together.
     
  19. Swampthing

    Swampthing Well-Known Member

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    WR my last comment to you, you have hyjacked this thread with your own agenda. The original post was about the USDA abandoning small farmers and ranchers in favor of International agribusiness. Since you are not American I don't understand why you comment on this. You are using "I recall" to blur the facts...


    If it were about anything other than money then country of origin labels wouldn't be out of the question. Given a choice, Americans would choose American Beef hands down and International Agribusiness knows this.

    No Thank you, You can keep your mad cows up there.

    I've copied you dis-info and sent it to the Canadian Cattlemans Assoiciation, you should be getting paid.
     
  20. wr

    wr Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Please state what part of my information is not factual and please show research to show such because I can back my facts, can you?